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how come nothing paranormal happens to me?

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posted on Jan, 12 2006 @ 04:19 AM
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Originally posted by BlackGuardXIII
On so many levels, I struggled with the comprehension of how it could be possible for me to have a half dozen simple vivid dreams that came true.
I'd be grateful if you were to expand on what you meant. I want to hear as much information on the subject of precognitive dreams as I can.

Personally I'm not an expert of predictive dreams/vivid dreams that come true. What I meant was that some people may see a dream coming true as pure coincidence with nothing paranormal about it, while other people might see it as a wonderful paranormal event.

You should consider reading some scientific literature about what your brain does while you sleep. Try to avoid psychology topics on this. Rather go for the biology themed literature.

A dream might be anything from a random neuron firing to a subconscious thought your subconscious mind "accidentally delivered" to your conscious mind - i.e. when you're not fast asleep.
There is little "known" facts about dreaming, and scientists battle to explain it. Most of it is guess work. It remains a wonderful undiscovered topic.

The problem with dreaming is that you don't remember it because your long-term memory isn't "active" while you sleep. Your short-term memory is active while you sleep, it stores about five to ten "facts"/events then overwrites the previous memory without ever "writing" it to your long-term memory. Thus you are more likely to remember a dream you had just before you woke up. You dream several dreams throughout the night (or whenever you sleep), but you're not aware of them because they were never written to long-term memory. Those that you do remember, you probably remember because you weren't in deep sleep (REM sleep) when you had them.
I know this is an over-simplification of a very complex topic, but it should give you an idea about the works of dreams and your brain.

Now, BlackGuard, if you can remember your vivid dreams in the finest details, hours or even days, weeks or years after you dreamt it (and in some cases come true above it all), then it's safe to assume that it's not just random neurons that fired, but some glimpse you had into the future. This is where your sixth sense comes in. Many people believe that everyone has the sixth sense of "sensing the future", but only some people use or know how to use the last sense.
From my experience I would guess that you cannot change the "future" that you dreamt. You only realise that you dreamt it, when the event has passed, right? When it's too late. See it as some sort of "preview" like a movie preview. Getting a glimpse of what's going to happen. And don't take everything literal.

Well, as I said, I'm not exactly an expert, but from what I know, that's my take on it.




posted on Jan, 12 2006 @ 04:51 AM
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precognitive, but not predictive. I have some psychology background, thanks. I am happy with my 35 year long journey to find an acceptable mechanism for what happened. I did. It is a little unsettling to happen across the exact, like a photograph, scene from a previous dream. A vivid, detailed dream that is clearly stored in memory before the unexpected discovery that it wasn't just a dream like all the other ones, like you thought, because once it came true later, it garnered a special footnote, it was an event that was hard for me to even begin to explain, yes, but no less real. There is a good reason I didn't come to an acceptable decision on them for 35 years. I couldn't find one.
And no, I realized it before it passed in some cases, and once I recognized it and began remembering the dream, I predicted what was coming up next. Some of them I tiold to people before they came about in material form, of course when I told them, I thought I was just recounting an odd dream.... It was odd allright.
One, of particular significance to me, I remembered, recounted, and wondered about the meaning of....for at least 8 years, before I found out what it meant. It was maybe the straw that broke the camels back, after 35 years of pretending I didn't have an unsolved puzzle in my head. I then felt I needed resolution, no more ignoring the incommensurability of my honest experiences and well, time for example.

There is a Native Indian proverb that is apt:
" It is impossible to awaken a man who is pretending to be asleep."
I tried pretending to be asleep for 35 years, but then my resigned acceptance of the fact that I didn't have an acceptable theory of how it could be so, and the virtual need to find one, became too much for me to duck any longer. .[edit on 03 22 2005 by BlackGuardXIII]

[edit on 03 22 2005 by BlackGuardXIII]



posted on Jan, 12 2006 @ 05:14 AM
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Originally posted by BlackGuardXIII
precognitive, but not predictive. I have some psychology background, thanks. I am happy with my 35 year long journey to find an acceptable mechanism for what happened. I did. It is a little unsettling to happen across the exact, like a photograph, scene from a previous dream. A vivid, detailed dream that is clearly stored in memory before the unexpected discovery that it wasn't just a dream like all the other ones, like you thought, because once it came true later, it garnered a special footnote, it was an event that was hard for me to even begin to explain, yes, but no less real. There is a good reason I didn't come to an acceptable decision on them for 35 years. I couldn't find one.
...


Sorry, looks like I misread the query. Doubt if I know anything about the sort of dreams you're referring to. Do you have these dreams at night when you sleep? Maybe it's not dreams at all, but just plain clearvoyance. Your Sixth sense?



posted on Jan, 12 2006 @ 05:27 AM
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You have voted Gemwolf for the Way Above Top Secret award. You have used all of your votes for this month.

You offered to share what you had learned, a gesture of goodwill, and that is very kind of you.
I am sorry. It is a touchy subject for me, still, at 41 years old, which is a little bit humbling.



posted on Jan, 13 2006 @ 01:34 PM
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Gemwolf's approach is probably the best way to go, quite enlightening in fact. But here's something fast and easy you can try: fall asleep in your chair, I'm serious!




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