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Refuse being RFID tagged in UK..

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posted on Jan, 6 2006 @ 02:39 PM
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From what I'm gathering, loam's concern over RFID is that it can be used to gather NEW information about you. RFID in itself isn't of much use to gather anything about your activitie's. The range is to small, to get it to transmit far enough would require a bigger source of power, thus making RFID tag's more noticable, thus meaning it's of no use to any secret orginization to get information about you. As far as illegal use's of RFID, I don't really see much use due to it's limited range. As far as illegal use of information you freely give away, that doesn't really pertain to the topic of this thread, but seeing as it's information YOU freely give away, if your too concerned about information being used against you, simply refuse to give out any information at all, thus making it appear even more that people are being paranoid delusionist's. Don't throw away trash either, what you throw away you might think isn't important, but someone else could use it against you.

What I'm getting at, it's all in your damn head's, all this fear over RFID... It's USELESS considering that there are HUNDRED'S of other easier traditional mean's of gathering information about you. RFID has a limited range, making it nearly USELESS to find out if you wash ur friggin pants or how long it took to eat your precious cheese your so worried about




posted on Jan, 6 2006 @ 02:54 PM
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Points taken Produkt.

...People here are saying that the legitimate use of RFID's may be part of a larger plan to familiarize people with RFID's use, and normalize their presence.

A similar strategy was used to replace cash with cash-cards - that was a 20-year plan as I recall, designed to set-up a cashless economy.

...Loam and other writers here are just saying that we need to look for a larger strategy, and not just accept the out-front press. Also that we need to think for ourselves and to research and evaluate what's happening on our own.





posted on Jan, 6 2006 @ 03:06 PM
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No one would accept being "tagged" and any power that may be would realize that. Any attempt to tag people wouldn't work unless it were forced upon us and that would lead to riot's and protest's like all hell broke lose. The fear over RFID has no foundation to stand on considering it's limited use of gathering information and tranmissital to whoever is gathering the information.

As for cash-card's.. Obviously that didn't work out. Honestly, I don't think people would be able to trust a cashless society. Right from the start of e-cash/digital cash online it was met with resitence and not much has come from it.

What I'm seeing is people voicing their fear's over new technologies without thinking it entirely through. YES, it *could* be used for wrong doing, but ... and there's alway's that but that these people refuse to look at. I fully understand the potential use's, BUT I also understand that alot of those potential uses won't see the light of day becuase society as a whole won't be very happy finding out about it and definatly won't succumb to being forced into it.



posted on Jan, 6 2006 @ 03:31 PM
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Originally posted by Produkt
No one would accept being "tagged" and any power that may be would realize that. Any attempt to tag people wouldn't work unless it were forced upon us and that would lead to riot's and protest's like all hell broke lose. The fear over RFID has no foundation to stand on considering it's limited use of gathering information and tranmissital to whoever is gathering the information.


Actually some people are already volunteering and they are starting to tag people who are admitted to hospital..

RFID tags may be implanted in patients' arms

RFID hospital trials reach Europe

Jenny's RFID implant

First humans receive biochip implant "Chipping" promoted as medical benefit

Clubbers choose chip implants to jump queues



aforementioned financial benefits to humanity come in the form of "VeriPay", which uses the chip for cash and credit transactions. This is not the first time RFID transaction solutions have been mooted, but there is, of course, a security issue. At the recent ID World 2003 (good title - well done) in Paris, Applied Digital Solutions CEO Scott R Silverman addressed the possibility of someone mislaying their RNID "credit card": "VeriPay’s unique, under-the-skin format offers a much more secure, tamper-proof, and loss-proof solution. VeriPay brings to consumers the benefits of fast and reliable RFID technology along with the security of a subdermal format."
Subdermal RFID chip provokes furore


Ex-Bush official to get RFID implant

I could go on... But I think the point is made..



As for cash-card's.. Obviously that didn't work out. Honestly, I don't think people would be able to trust a cashless society. Right from the start of e-cash/digital cash online it was met with resitence and not much has come from it.


Well a cashless society will probably happen, but it doesn't matter if it does, because guess what - money is being RFID chipped too. And I'm not talking about US$ specualtion from PrisonPlanet - it's official:

Euro bank notes to embed RFID chips by 2005

Euro notes to get RFID tags from Hitachi?

Radio ID chips may track banknotes



What I'm seeing is people voicing their fear's over new technologies without thinking it entirely through. YES, it *could* be used for wrong doing, but ... and there's alway's that but that these people refuse to look at. I fully understand the potential use's, BUT I also understand that alot of those potential uses won't see the light of day becuase society as a whole won't be very happy finding out about it and definatly won't succumb to being forced into it.


Well it is happening, and no-one can do anything about it - take a look at the dates on those articles - they are 2/3 years old now - it's already happened.
Here in the UK the nationwide NPRS (Number Plate Recognition System) comes online in 3 months, guess what RFID Number plates are on the way too. These ones are active and carry a battery enabling them to have a much greater range..



The British government is preparing to test new high-tech license plates containing microchips capable of transmitting unique vehicle identification numbers and other data to readers more than 300 feet away.

Officials in the United States say they'll be closely watching the British trial as they contemplate initiating their own tests of the plates, which incorporate radio frequency identification, or RFID, tags to make vehicles electronically trackable.
Brit License Plates Get Chipped


Website of e-plate manufacturer

Not RFID but still vehicle tracking is GPS enabled Pay As You Drive Insurance by Norwich Union:



"Pay as you drive"™ insurance¹ is a revolutionary new type of car insurance, which enables us to provide cover as individual as you are.

Using the lastest GPS (Global Positioning Satellite) technology we are able to calculate monthly insurance premiums based on how often, when and where you drive, which means that your premiums are based on your own driving habits and not everyone else's.
Norwich Union Insurance


Tesco is starting to use RFID:



Twenty years ago the barcode transformed shopping for customers – with improved availability and pricing accuracy, and with greater efficiency came lower prices. Barcodes made life easier for our staff, freeing them up to spend more time with customers.

The Radio Barcode is the next big thing.

At the most basic level Radio Barcodes have the potential to give us accurate and near real-time visibility of all the products we sell, right down to the individual item. That visibility will be throughout our supply chain from the factory to the store. Much of this can be achieved without human intervention – imagine, no more stock counting, no more checking deliveries at the back door.
Tesco Website


RFID Chips are being put into practically everything. An RFID chip is not like a barcode becasue each one is unique.

There is a good article summerising here:



Right now, you can buy a hammer, a pair of jeans, or a razor blade with anonymity. With RFID tags, that may be a thing of the past. Some manufacturers are planning to tag just the packaging, but others will also tag their products. There is no law requiring a label indicating that an RFID chip is in a product. Once you buy your RFID-tagged jeans at The Gap with RFID-tagged money, walk out of the store wearing RFID-tagged shoes, and get into your car with its RFID-tagged tires, you could be tracked anywhere you travel. Bar codes are usually scanned at the store, but not after purchase. But RFID transponders are, in many cases, forever part of the product, and designed to respond when they receive a signal. Imagine everything you own is "numbered, identified, catalogued, and tracked." Anonymity and privacy? Gone in a hailstorm of invisible communication, betrayed by your very property.

But let's not stop there. Others are talking about placing RFID tags into all sensitive or important documents: "it will be practical to put them not only in paper money, but in drivers' licenses, passports, stock certificates, manuscripts, university diplomas, medical degrees and licenses, birth certificates, and any other sort of document you can think of where authenticity is paramount." In other words, those documents you're required to have, that you can't live without, will be forever tagged.

Consider the human body as well. Applied Digital Solutions has designed an RFID tag - called the VeriChip - for people. Only 11 mm long, it is designed to go under the skin, where it can be read from four feet away. They sell it as a great way to keep track of children, Alzheimer's patients in danger of wandering, and anyone else with a medical disability, but it gives me the creeps. The possibilities are scary. In May, delegates to the Chinese Communist Party Congress were required to wear an RFID-equipped badge at all times so their movements could be tracked and recorded. Is there any doubt that, in a few years, those badges will be replaced by VeriChip-like devices?
RFID Chips Are Here


[edit on 6-1-2006 by AgentSmith]



posted on Jan, 6 2006 @ 04:02 PM
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Note: Volunteering, NOT forced.




The Federal Drug Administration issued a ruling on Tuesday that essentially begins a final review process that will determine whether hospitals can use RFID systems from the company to identify patients and/or permit relevant hospital staff to access medical records


The main bulk of the article discuss's security application's for gaining access to certain function's by medical staff.

The whole volunteering part in itself says alot about the fear of potential use. No one is going to FORCE you to use these tag's. It's up to your own free will. I highly doubt any company can legally implant you nor hold it against you if you refuse. If you feel different, please post the proper law's that say they have every right to do so.




Subdermal RFID chip provokes furore


Notice how this one application for RFID is already being met with resitance. Notice how it too isn't being FORCED.

By all right's, it's good that they should RFID tag bank note's. This would put an end to counterfitting. Which is a GOOD thing. Trust me, this application is GOOD and should be done.

For RFID tracking car's... What are you afraid of? This is good for tracking stolen vehicle's. Criminal's on the run. Unless you've commited a crime, or plan to in the future then this application shouldn't affect you in the slightest bit.




Right now, you can buy a hammer, a pair of jeans, or a razor blade with anonymity.


Sure, if you don't use a credit card and can magicly appear invisible to security and security camera's.




But let's not stop there. Others are talking about placing RFID tags into all sensitive or important documents: "it will be practical to put them not only in paper money, but in drivers' licenses, passports, stock certificates, manuscripts, university diplomas, medical degrees and licenses, birth certificates, and any other sort of document you can think of where authenticity is paramount." In other words, those documents you're required to have, that you can't live without, will be forever tagged.


Tagging these document's which identify a person would lead to the authenticy of those document's, thus showing who's a forgery and who's not. Given the limit range of RFID, tagging these document's is of trivial concern. Including given the fact that the government ALREADY has these documents.

As for each tag being unique... GOOD! Ensure's they are SECURE.



posted on Jan, 6 2006 @ 04:20 PM
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Oh you get me wrong, I tihnk it's a good thing in a lot of ways - on paper and used the way it should be it's excellent. But it can be mis-used in a variety of ways too sadly. It makes framing people easier in a lot of respects if your a dab hand at hacking and improvising, especially in a society where everything is practically automated.
I was framed once at college where someone sent a rude message to a teacher spoofing the ID of the computer I was logged into, they wouldn't beleive me. All the 'evidence' pointed to me. Serves me right for all the times I did it I guess

Point is that these things will leave that sort of thing open to abuse and people won't care and won't bother checking when anyone says it isn't true becasue everyone will say the same when caught.
That's just one of the negative aspects of it.

Yes I know that they can trace anything to anyone if they want, but by doing this it makes it much faster and fully autonomous rather than relying on dozens or hundreds of man hours.
Even then you are unlikely to find most connections between things, but with all information being held on databases linked to a central databank (which they will be one day) no-one will have to do much - the computer will do it for them.

Yes it has many, many positvie aspects, I embrace it in a lot of ways. Being a Radio Amateur I play around with APRS (Automatic Position Reporting Service) which has been around over a decade, it was developed as a tactical management system and reports on your exact position - giving additional details and allowing transfer of data and messages.
So don't get me wrong, I play around with that sort of thing, have done for years and can see many good uses for it - but it will open many new doors for abuse.

As for the RFID implants, virtually everyone I have spoken too in my real life - speaking casually about it - has said they will happily take one. Even the ones that say they think it's odd say they will if it's offered - not many people will refuse and once the grooming phase is complete the very few that are left won't matter and will be looked on as freaks by everyone else.
The articles I posted are a few years old, a lot has actually happened now and more is taking place. People's attitudes have changed.
People are volunteering for them just to have NightClub membership - did you notice that? Most people when in hospital will not argue about having one. Once it's in - it's in and that unique number stays with you.
You can't force people to do things against their will, but you can make them want to do it.

As for the tags being secure due to being unique - they can be copied. They may be encrypted but the encryption protocols can be leaked and/or hacked. Many companies are involved in the deisgn, manufacture, deployment and use of these products. Anyone in that chain who gets the oppurtunity may decide to sell or volunteer the information, use it for personal gain or even be blackmailed into handing it over. Items can be stolen from someone's house/car/caravan/etc and be placed at a crime scene. Whereas before the criminal would have to worry about fingerprints being on there, now all they ahve to worry about is nothing - because the RFID will tie it back to the person being framed. Finger prints being on there will just be a bonus


The ANPR/RFID aspect with regards to cars is a godsend in some ways to criminals, now tehy just have to look for similar vehicles and copy their number plates. You have to produce a logbook/etc to do it now - unless you're a garage with the appropiate, easy to get, licence - then you just ring up and order what you want. A serious crime syndicate would have no problem getting them made, then you just stick them on and laugh as the system labels Joe Bloggs as being in the area or being the getaway vehicle.

You have to think like a criminal would, see how you can use it to your advantage (if you were one) - then you will see a startling new flood of possibilities before your eyes - and with those the inevitable drawbacks for good honest citizen's like us


Scarily for you my friend, you are talking to a skeptic of a lot of conspiracies and someone that embraces technology. I also know a fair bit about RFID, tracking, etc and basically help develop it by taking part as a hobby, yet even I can see the negative aspects.
Isn't it time you opened your eyes?

[edit on 6-1-2006 by AgentSmith]



posted on Jan, 6 2006 @ 05:25 PM
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So basicly what your getting at is it's no more secure then current system's.

I still don't see the big deal over it. It's NOT being forced onto anyone. Anyone who does use it willfully, that's they're own choice. If it cam down to being FORCED, I could see the problem, but thankfully no one in their right mind would succumb to being forced to using anything that would track them.

Really look at the big picture, not just your fear's of it... Like you said, it could be used for wrong doing, but how far do you think society would let it go before it even came to that?



posted on Jan, 6 2006 @ 05:39 PM
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It has already being incorporated into things, including money, clothes, etc.
It isn't a matter of 'when', it is happening now. If you asked anyone a year or two ago if they would accept car tracking they would say no, but it's happening in three months - FINAL.
No-one is doing jack about it - people are all talk but when it comes down to it they don't want to jeopordise their current life. We're not talking about some romantic notion of starting a 'resistance' or something - this isn't terminator, or Demolition Man - this is real life. It's not 'going to' happen - it has happened and is happening.
Get this idea out of your head that probably comes from the movies that all the citizens will rise up and make a stand - it ISN'T happening.
On paper it is all a great idea, but it there are many potentials for abuse that havn't been eliminated to cut costs - that is the problem.
I'm not talking about the evil lizard people using it to take over the world
I'm talking about REAL life problems that we will face.

People don't need to be forced into it - the majority are already willing to accept it (even with a few moans and groans) the minority that are left will ridiculed and persecuted.
People are already volunteering to have tracking devices fitted to their cars that relay back all speeds, positions, etc to a central database just for cheaper car insurance.
In March this year all car journeys will be tracked by a central computer using ANPR, later to be upgraded to implement RFID numberplates.. Guess what - people are whinging but it's still happening. No resistance, no uprising - inevitable compliance.
No-one really wants to lose their day-to-day life and endanger their families, those more likely to even attempt to start any sort of resistance will be people psycologically labeled as 'loners'. No-one will care what happens to them, here in England there would be no-where for them to go, you can't get very far from civilisation here. In the US what will you do? Go hide out in the hills? Then you will be hunted down and killed if it comes to it and no-one will know and no-one will care.

People are volunteering for implantable RFID just to get into a nightclub.

It is more secure in a lot of ways to the current 'system', and it is also fully automated and gives the illusion to the users of being infallible. That is the problem. The sellers of the technology will not be eager to expose any drawbacks, obviously, and the users will assume the system cannot be wrong. People will be wrongfully persecuted.

I'm not paranoid, I just know enough about the technology through experimentation and research (along with my twisted way of thinking) to already see a wealth of negative opportunities arising. Real life negative oppurtunities.

I'm not scared of it half as much as I should be
But I know a lot of people should...


[edit on 6-1-2006 by AgentSmith]



posted on Jan, 6 2006 @ 06:25 PM
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Your right, people aren't do anything about it. People ARE volunterring to use it. It's not that no one see's the potential bad side, god know's enough people have been talking about it for quiet some time now. The only people whinging about the potential bad use are the people who SHOULD fear the potential bad use. Unless you have something to hide, then what's the big deal? Unless your commiting crime's or plan on commiting crime's you have nothing to hide in the first place. The technology can't control you and there are other option's out there that don't require the use of this technology available to anyone who "fears" this technology. Like I said, paranoid delusionist's and in some cases, potential criminal activities are the ONLY people who would fear ANY technology that could have POTENTIAL misuse. I could use a pencil to kill some one despite the intended purpose of a pencil, doesn't matter WHAT you have, anything and everything has a potential misuse. Now, unless your gunna go crying the sky is falling, then there's nothing to fear. Just DON'T use it if your so concerned. Goto town meeting's. Start petition's. Start a movement group. If you THAT upset over it, whereas hardly anyone else is, the DO SOMETHING rather then whinging about it.



posted on Jan, 7 2006 @ 03:11 AM
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I tihnk I already said I don't personally care too much, I just provide information for other people to make their own decisions.
What people might concern themselves with is what exactly will be made against the law in the first place, people will probably get fed up with a constant barrage of fines because they have gone 1mph over the speed limit (which is already happening here in the UK). We have technology to prevent that from happening but then they wouldn't make money from the fines would they..
It's important to make sure the system works properly and most angles of misuse have been covered, problem is that these ideas get implemented before they are ready. Take the Airwave TETRA system here in the UK, it's causing endless problems because it, like most things, is rushed out prematurely.
If the same attitude is taken with RFID, which it is, then it leaves it potentially open for more misuse. The problem is that too many companies are involved in the various stages of development and there is too many oppurtunities for sensitive data regarding the encryption methods, etc to get into the wrong hands.
Because people will on the whoel have teh same attitude as you, that nothign is likely to happen negatively and that the system is 'secure', it means that when it is misused people are less liekyl to question it having been lulled into a false sense of security.
I take it you don't actually know much about RFID and how it works...



posted on Jan, 7 2006 @ 04:28 PM
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Here's a new one:

Microchip RFID Hand Implants Now Available

Wooowooo. It's getting normalized...



posted on Jan, 7 2006 @ 04:44 PM
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From your link..



Text For years, Christians have warned of a day when microchip implants would become required at the hand of the beast that is described in Revelations Chapter 13 as the mark of the beast.




Are we going to base our fear's on a bunch of christians, the same people who've been crying it's the end time's for centuries? They are by far the most paranoid.


Again... I notice the technology isn't being FORCED.




posted on Jan, 7 2006 @ 04:50 PM
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Produkt - you completely dismissed the first response in that thread, by far the most important criticism of the product:



Originally posted by Netchicken

In the hand?
What sort of stupid place is that?
Lose your hand and you are ID lost.

The best place to put it in right in the middle of the forehead. Then all you have to do is bend over a scanning machine to be identified.




posted on Jan, 7 2006 @ 05:10 PM
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In the hand?


How many people have lost their hands though? Who would even be willing to cut their hand off?



posted on Jan, 7 2006 @ 05:45 PM
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I'm not dismissing the potential uses. I'm just pointing out that it's not being FORCED. You don't want it, find alternative's. You've got plenty of alternative's that don't require your using this technology. So really, it's alllll innnn yourrrr headsss



posted on Jan, 7 2006 @ 07:11 PM
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Erm. This is a good thread on RFID products: Microchip RFID Hand Implants Now Available

And yes, wooowooo. RFID use is getting normalized.

Netchicken said having the chip in the hand is a bad idea because if you lose your hand you lose your identity. That would be a joke...





posted on Jan, 7 2006 @ 07:39 PM
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Originally posted by Produkt
I'm not dismissing the potential uses. I'm just pointing out that it's not being FORCED. You don't want it, find alternative's. You've got plenty of alternative's that don't require your using this technology. So really, it's alllll innnn yourrrr headsss


"Force" implies an authoritarian demand to comply, but it can also mean a lack of choice.

The issue is that commercial interest will by definition drive the ubiquity of these devices. Their prevalence will appear without your consent, under colorable arguments that interfere, until much later, with the realization that some harm or abuses are in play. The point is to recognize the technology as an inevitability, and decide in advance of such harm or abuses what you will do to prevent them in the first place.

Of course, that doesn't happen, because people insist upon believing that no such harm or abuse is possible or likely- and purely because they do not understand the technology, or its potential uses... or for more "self-interested" reasons...


The impact of these devices upon society will be profound.

There is no question much good will come from it. But it will also bring the negative. How do we intend to deal with that?!

Discussion of NWO plots (a red herring in my view) is irrelevant to the matter at hand. It also applies to this subject matter a pejorative sense of the word conspiracy that is unhelpful in recognizing the inevitable and profound issues before us.

If you think this technology will not be profound, you are simply wrong.

Commercial interest alone will be sufficient to drive the change. Our lives today will look nothing like the one we are crafting for ourselves tomorrow.

Why is it threatening to discuss how we might wish to manage such profound change?

I began my posts on this thread, posing the following questions:



Will you know who has access to such data?

Will you even know what data is available on you?

Will you know what assumptions or decisions will be made on the basis of such data?

What meaningful oversight will be applied to the use and distribution of such data?

What avenues of appeal will be made available in cases of abuse?


There should likely be many more questions asked...

If there is a conspiracy to be found in this subject, it is in the failure to recognize that the such change is inevitable and will be profound.

There is no doubt in my mind that such failure is caused... negligently, by some... and... wilfully, by others...

What are the excuses for either?


[edit on 7-1-2006 by loam]



posted on Jan, 7 2006 @ 08:26 PM
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"Force" implies an authoritarian demand to comply, but it can also mean a lack of choice.


It *could* also mean lack of choice, but that's not the case here. There IS another option. It's your choice to take that option or take the RFID. What you decide is of your own doing.




The impact of these devices upon society will be profound.


If you CHOOSE to use them. If you don't CHOOSE to use them, they won't have any impact on you.

The question's you posted are valid to those who CHOOSE to use this technology. It has no meaning to those who CHOOSE not to use the technology.




If there is a conspiracy to be found in this subject, it is in the failure to recognize that the such change is inevitable and will be profound.


If there is a conspiracy, you should point it out. What would lead you to the conclusion that there is a conspiracy. What are your source's. Is it completly based upon the *potential* usage or do you have have information based in reality that lead's you to this conclusion? If so, you should be posting information on that and not on these news article's that show how the technology isn't being used for what you keep thinking it COULD be used for. All you and other's in this thread have been doing is posting article about it's current use and POTENTIAL bad use without posting anything about CURRENT bad use. Potential mean's jack. Like I said, a pencil has the potential to kill someone if used for that purpose. How often do you see that? Any technology has POTENTIAL to do harm. Are we going to worry over every little new peice of technology? I can assure you it's going to get much much much more advanced and *potentially* scary then it is now.

Gun's are profound and have made a major impact on society. Do you see the powers to be using it against us, which they easily could. No. Why? Because there's no evil NWO plot. That should be fairly evident concidering how every nation on this planet has trouble getting along.



posted on Jan, 8 2006 @ 04:35 AM
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I think people who are volunteering to have these chips implanted have not given it a serious thought and do not know about the possible consequences. I'd say there is a bit of manipulation involved.

I have to agree with AgentSmith. In some aspects RFID chips could be for good use, but when you start applying them to everything there is much more potential for abuse ... and I don't like it.



posted on Jan, 8 2006 @ 05:05 AM
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Originally posted by Produkt
If you CHOOSE to use them. If you don't CHOOSE to use them, they won't have any impact on you.


Your absolutely right, one could CHOOSE not to drive a car of Motorbike, one could CHOOSE not to use cash or credit cards, one could CHOOSE not to wear clothes, one could CHOOSE not to buy products from a shop, one could CHOOSE to commit suicide instead because there will practically not be any other choice, unless you plan to live as a hermit in the hills

As the tech is becoming more and more common people will have less aversion to it, as I said before the number of people that would have to be 'forced' diminishes to an insignificant number.
The technology is also disguised under a number of different names, for instance if you want to find the Tesco webpage on their use of RFID you have to type in 'Tesco Radio Barcodes', Tesco RFID only brings up third party pages.
The technology used in Passports and such is called 'Contactless Smart Cards' - though they do a little more work than traditional RFID as they also encrypt the data (by a third party).

Being 'forced' into it does not mean being held down while it's put into you, being forced also means slowly eliminating all other options.
I don't think it's an Illuminati plot or the Devil's work, it's just open for abuse.

There are also things like this to consider, while it may sound far fetched AI technology is getting more and more advanced, as all these systems are or will be tied into each other and in some cases operate through central computers, the possibility of the machine 'going wrong' in a similar way as the infamous Skynet becomes a possibility. We are admittedly a decade or so off that I imagine as a lot of advanced AI I believe is still in the lab stage, but programs have been developed that if given the oppurtunity would escape onto the Internet and 'breed'. If an malfunctioning AI had access to all of this technology it would be able to locate all humans quickly and easily.
While we are a few years (hopefully) off having to seriously worry about something like that, it is still something that will have to be considered.

The problem is no-one seems too eager to sit down and brainstorm these problems, not anyone who is involved in selling the RFID technology anyway



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