It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Fort in Edinburgh with molten rock foundation

page: 1
0

log in

join
share:
Wig

posted on Jan, 1 2006 @ 06:24 PM
link   
I saw a program on TV about earths mysteries, there was this fort in Scotland possibly near Edingburgh. The wall was made from rock which had then been melted. The reason they gave was probably that it was a straight line or square shaped, so it was not natural.

It is not as far as I know Edinburgh Castle which is built on a naturally formed molten rock crag.

Anyone know what I am on about?




posted on Jan, 1 2006 @ 06:45 PM
link   
I think you might mean Stirling Castle.





Source
Stirling Castle is an historic castle in Stirling, Scotland. The castle sits atop the castle hill, a volcanic crag, and is surrounded on three sides by steep cliffs. The castle is a national monument, and is managed by the Historic Scotland agency.

It is the headquarters of the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders regiment, although the regiment is no longer garrisoned there. The regimental museum is located within the castle.

Most of the principal buildings of the Castle date from the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries. A few structures of the fourteenth century remain, while the outer defences fronting the town date from the early eighteenth century.



Source
Stirling Castle is set at the very heart of the kingdom, on a high volcanic rock, it commands the countryside. Before the marshes to its west were drained and the network of roads and railways around its base was developed, its situation was even more commanding, and whoever possessed the castle was well placed to control all movement throughout the centre of Scotland. Not for nothing was it likened to 'a huge brooch clasping Highlands and Lowlands together'.


Yahoo: Stirling Castle



posted on Jan, 1 2006 @ 07:04 PM
link   
There are quite a few sites of vitrified forts inside Scotland as well as others outside Scotland. Unfortunately not knowing much about Scottish geography, all I can do is offer a few suggestions for you to check out. The reasons for the vitrifications of the forts go from trying to strengthen the walls against attackers, to being vitrified by attackers using Greek fire or laser beams, depending on who you consult. Since they are often linked to myths, some of the theories can be a little far out there, but you have to choose what you believe.


One of the best examples of a vitrified fort is Tap o'Noth, which is near the village of Rhynie in northeastern Scotland. This massive fort from prehistory is on the summit of a mountain of the same name which, being 1,859 feet (560 metres) high, commands an impressive view of the Aberdeenshire countryside. At first glance it seems that the walls are made of a rubble of stones, but on closer look it is apparent that they are made not of dry stones but of melted rocks! What were once individual stones are now black and cindery masses, fused together by heat that must have been so intense that molten rivers of rock once ran down the walls.

There are at least 50 such forts throughout Scotland. Among the most well-known are Dunnideer, Craig Phadraig (near Inverness), Abernathy (near Perth), Dun Lagaidh (in Ross), Cromarty, Arka-Unskel, Eilean na Goar, and Bute-Dunagoil on the Sound of Bute off Arran Island. Another well-known vitrified fort is the Cauadale hill-fort in Argyll, West Scotland.



Others include, Dun Mac Uisneachain (Dun Macsnoichan), the ancient Beregoiium, about 9 m. N.N.E. of Oban; Tap o’ Noth, in Aberdeenshire; Craig Phadraic, or Phadrick, near Inverness; Dun Dhardhail (Dunjardil) in Glen Nevis; Knockfarrail, near Strathpeffer; Dun Creich, in Sutherland; Finhaven, near Aberlemno; Barryhill, in Perthshire; Laws, near Dundee; Dun Gall and Burnt Island, in Buteshire; Anwoth, in Kirkcudbright; and Cowdenknowes, in Berwickshire. Dun Mac Tjisneachain is the largest in area, being 250 yds. long by 50 yds. broad. In Barryhill and Laws the remains of small rectangular dwellings have been found.


logos..._endless_summer.tripod.com/id139.html


Wig

posted on Jan, 2 2006 @ 05:40 AM
link   
Odium, nice castle, but I was looking for unnatural molten rock.

Sparkie,

That's the stuff! thanks.



posted on Jan, 9 2006 @ 06:13 PM
link   
Yeah I have heard of forts that are like that, the walls are melted or fused together. Most of them are in britain/scotland but dont know where.



posted on Jan, 26 2006 @ 11:13 PM
link   

Originally posted by Wig
I saw a program on TV about earths mysteries, there was this fort in Scotland possibly near Edingburgh. The wall was made from rock which had then been melted. The reason they gave was probably that it was a straight line or square shaped, so it was not natural.

It is not as far as I know Edinburgh Castle which is built on a naturally formed molten rock crag.

Anyone know what I am on about?

That's so retarded...sills and dikes are by definition near-linear formations and devil's collumns is a colloquial name for fractured basalt that cooled too fast and formed collumns of polygonal shapes ... ancient men thought they were built by Giants.


Wig

posted on Feb, 18 2006 @ 03:07 PM
link   

Originally posted by Stratrf_RusThat's so retarded...sills and dikes are by definition near-linear formations and devil's collumns is a colloquial name for fractured basalt that cooled too fast and formed collumns of polygonal shapes ... ancient men thought they were built by Giants.


Not sure what you're getting at here, but to add a few clarifiers for you...

I only vaguely remember the program (or is it spelt programme?) and I remember the TV presenter walking along a straight line wall which was molten rock (solidified). It was clearly a man made fortress about a 1000 years ago, because they showed an overhead helicopter shot.

So when I said "The reason they gave was probably that it was a straight line or square shaped, so it was not natural." I was
a) Just waffling
b) trying to remember a program I saw 10 - 15 years ago
c) guessing

It is clear that these forts do exist in Scotland, there are 10s (tens) of them.....(tens as opposed to hundreds) and they are definately forts because the archaeologists say they are.

NOTE: For anyone interested in this, I went to the site linked to by Sparkie the wondersnail in his post above.....and he has copy/pasted a couple of quotes from the site. If you look at the quote there is this sentance
"Another well-known vitrified fort is the Cauadale hill-fort in Argyll"

This one interested me because I though it was going to be one I could more easily get to see but I could not find it anywhere......try googling "Cauadale hill" and you will see a great example of internet plagiarism, but in this case they are all reproducing the original mistake by the author. I finally found out that this is actually refferring to:
Carradale Fort

from that site: "At Carradale there is a vitrified Iron Age Fort"



new topics

top topics



 
0

log in

join