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My son is joining the army in a couple months

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posted on Dec, 30 2005 @ 12:47 PM
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excuse me all for the religious reference...but....

I pray that God goes with him and is always there protecting him from whatever dangers he may encounter....

forgive me if I've offended anyone....




posted on Dec, 30 2005 @ 12:53 PM
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Originally posted by Chicken on a Stick
Hey cool. Noise, you coming in as open electronics? I am in the Air Force right now, as computer/network administrator. The title is Computer Communcations Systems Controller. You should check it out.... You are entitled to be investigated for your TOP SECRET clearance. I have mine...


Awesome!

Would you mind if I U2U a few questions?

Personally, I want to try and get into Space Command.



posted on Dec, 30 2005 @ 12:59 PM
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godservant, you people believe the recruiter?!? Great. Now, about a bridge I would like to offer you....


Military Police is likely to be more dangerous than infantry in that countrry, as MP's are specifically trained and employed for such rolls.

MP's are also as combat ready and employed as infantry, often times with larger combat loads (ammo and weapons).

How would I know? Of the Troops and For the Troops. That was our (MP) motto.



posted on Dec, 30 2005 @ 01:10 PM
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To godservant...

As a member myself of the US Armed Forces, I can tell you that your son is honestly considering a noble career. I don't like the fact that when some people think about the US military, they immediately think about the Iraq CONFLICT. But that isn't what this is about. If he really wants to join the military, and you are concerned about his welfare, perhaps you should try convincing him of the Air Force. Trust me, they get just as well of training, and get to play with all the same hardware, just aren't getting as MUCH combat time. I am in communications, but when I was in Korea, I was a Security Forces Augmentee. That just means I did my normal job, but if ol Kim Jong wanted to get rowdy, I would join up with my SF Fire Team.

Now for another point of why he should reconsider services (nothing against the others, I just like mine so much, so I will try to sell it LOL). My new unit that I am stationed in is Ramstein, Germany. Combat Communications to be specific, pretty much everything base comm does but is mobile. Now why I point this out is that this year alone I have deployed to Africa five times, three of them humanitarian missions. For things most Americans never hear about, but are much worse atrocities. One for instance was in support of sending troops in to stop the genocide in the Darfur region of Sudan, where people were getting slaughtered. Every one of these missions Air Force Security Forces went with. Another thing is the standard of living. Army always makes fun of us that we are pampered. LOL. True, everytime I have went downrange, I have always stayed in a hotel even in the desert. Just throwing this all out there as an option.

To sum it all up, whatever service your son decides to join, I wish him the best of luck, and maybe some day we can share a beer in a pub downrange....

Peace.

[edit on 30-12-2005 by Chicken on a Stick]



posted on Dec, 30 2005 @ 01:29 PM
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To Noise. Good career field. I wanted to go to Space Command too, but then I had friends that went there after Tech School. They said it was sooooo boring. LOL. All they did all day was sit at a computer screen making sure satellite links were up. If they went down, they called the contractor. You as a military member won't have direct control over something like that high dollar of an asset, it is going to be a civilian with 15+ years experience. Now, if you DO want to get into the Satellite field, and an area that you can make mega bucks when you get out (VERY similar to my career field, and at my station I have been trained on it), you can go into Satellite Communications (SATCOM). These are the people who handle the satellite link on the ground. Setting up the dish, configuring the modems/multiplexers for proper frequencies, things like that. This is maybe something you should look into...


BTW, I love this site.
One year reader, one week writer. LOL.

[edit on 30-12-2005 by Chicken on a Stick]



posted on Dec, 30 2005 @ 01:35 PM
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Originally posted by OneGodJesus

Originally posted by Dronetek
He isnt a pawn and any suggestion that he is will probobly offend quite a few people on these forums.


Amen.

People who have a: never served, b: aren't understanding the concept of service before self, or c: are haters and won't understand that it is a CALLING and opportunity that many cannot afford. To use a quote:

"Ask not what your country can do for you; ask what you can do for your country"
Words from the inaugural address of President John F. Kennedy, delivered in 1961.

There you go ya haters. From a Dem no less.


Well I apologize, if it's a calling it's a calling. Done. Yet, I hope he returns safely.

I don't support Bush or the current US gov't state, but those troops need the most encouragment of all. It's not Bush fighting out there it's our kids, family and friends.

[edit on 30-12-2005 by the_renegade]



posted on Dec, 30 2005 @ 01:36 PM
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Congrats to your Son...I come form a family with a couple of military man myself. Supporting the military has nothing to do with supporting President Bush... in fact...that makes it sound like the military never exhsited untill President Bush was elected?

Anywho ... support your son, politics aside. He is your son no metter who the President is or what wars are going on. Obviously he must have no problems with the situation or he would not be joining the Army. Maybe he believes in the casue, and wants to do what his heart tells him to... and for that just support him, no buts or iffs... CONGRATS !



posted on Dec, 30 2005 @ 01:41 PM
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Just a short thank you to your son..
ok, millions of thank you's
ok billions..

Thank him for his service to our country.
You should be proud..and yes, a little worried..he's your boy.



posted on Dec, 30 2005 @ 02:37 PM
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Originally posted by spacedoubt
Just a short thank you to your son..
ok, millions of thank you's
ok billions..

Thank him for his service to our country.
You should be proud..and yes, a little worried..he's your boy.


He'll see this post in a couple days. I thank him on things including things. A good parent learns more from their kids then they learn from theri parents.

I seek his untainted wisdom often.

While he doesn't support Bush, he, like me, supports the troops. I don't even know if he'll go to Iraq yet, but if he does, he would be a good one to have there to help get this bad deal finished more quickly.

And thanks so far, to both sides of this coin and all points between. He will learn from this post when he reads it in a couple days.



posted on Dec, 30 2005 @ 04:04 PM
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Originally posted by noise

Originally posted by Chicken on a Stick
Hey cool. Noise, you coming in as open electronics? I am in the Air Force right now, as computer/network administrator. The title is Computer Communcations Systems Controller. You should check it out.... You are entitled to be investigated for your TOP SECRET clearance. I have mine...


Awesome!

Would you mind if I U2U a few questions?

Personally, I want to try and get into Space Command.


DON"T DO IT!!!!!! Space Command is NOT the Real Air Force- heck it should not even be considered military any more than most think of the Post office as being military. Nothing but politics and more politics with every one scrambling to make rank- stabbing in back?-ha- you'll get 20 daggers in your chest in half a second. Anyone other than type 'A' personality folks should never consider a job in Space Command because you become the targets for those daggers since you are the easiest to eliminate.

Since they almost never deploy and the wartime "mission" is the same as peace time there is nothing Space Command does that could not be contracted out like most of the other non-military-essential parts of the Air Force. (like motor pool- air traffic control- catering) So with no REAL job people spend their time screwing you over, shuffling paper from one stack to another, changing names of organizations to make your paperwork harder, and setting up BBQs, change of commands, promotions, and farewells. (Sorry, cold, hard, FACTS)

I am in Space Command now and have been since 99. Granted I am an officer and giving you an officers perspective, but it is still nothing like the good ol days in the early 90s when I was a part of the REAL Air Force in a flying Wing. I've had quite a few jobs in SC and there is nothing glamorous about it- I even launched rockets from the West coast- more of a let down then you can imagine (building with no windows 11 miles from pad). Been to the north pole for a year as well (another building with no windows- watching blips on a screen). wooweee. Now I sit in another building with no windows building power point slide shows and ATS is the highlight of my day
)

Unfortunately, the Space Command is also the Hells Angels of the AF- If you get into it do not expect to EVER be let go to something else. Those scrambling for rank need someone to take the fall for them. There are no winners without losers and those unwilling to play politics, or type 'B' personalities, or someone with an unfortunate event in their life (divorce, death in family, etc) are always the losers.

If you like paper cuts, ulcers, migraines, and anal bleeding go for Space Command. I suggest you would be way happier in AMC or ACC.

As negative as all this surely comes across don't get me wrong: I LOVE the Air Force- and plan to retire if I can survive the Space Command hell- the Air Force IS a great way of life- I really enjoyed every bit of my time in the REAL Air Force- even the rough times during desert storm and losing my first wife. The people went out of their way to support me during the tough times then. There was real job satisfaction after a day at work there- I KNEW how my effort contributed to the big picture and politics were much less- a person could move up just being good at what they did- not because they were a dirt bag good ol' boy.

Go to the real Air Force and avoid Space Command at all cost.

Honestly, I would much rather be EOD or that poor MP in IRAQ because at least then you know who your enemies are and you are DOING something with known risks.

MPs WILL be one of the first to go- it is a job all services are short in. They WILL spend a good deal of their life overseas, it is also (in the AF) the job with the highest turnover due to the younger troops getting into trouble all the time. It is also one of the jobs with the lowest satisfaction rating- who wants to stand 8 hours at a gate saluting cars?

God be with all you young-uns- there are good jobs out there and while it is unlikely maybe we will be out of Iraq soon.



posted on Dec, 30 2005 @ 04:29 PM
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Originally posted by launchpad
DON"T DO IT!!!!!! Space Command is NOT the Real Air Force- heck it should not even be considered military any more than most think of the Post office as being military. Nothing but politics and more politics with every one scrambling to make rank- stabbing in back?-ha- you'll get 20 daggers in your chest in half a second. Anyone other than type 'A' personality folks should never consider a job in Space Command because you become the targets for those daggers since you are the easiest to eliminate.

Since they almost never deploy and the wartime "mission" is the same as peace time there is nothing Space Command does that could not be contracted out like most of the other non-military-essential parts of the Air Force. (like motor pool- air traffic control- catering) So with no REAL job people spend their time screwing you over, shuffling paper from one stack to another, changing names of organizations to make your paperwork harder, and setting up BBQs, change of commands, promotions, and farewells. (Sorry, cold, hard, FACTS)


Well .. thanks for the brutal honesty. Thats exactly what I needed. You might have saved me from 20 daggers.



posted on Jan, 3 2006 @ 03:07 AM
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First of all, congrats to your son and well... I don't know what is customary to say to someone in your position really, but I'd say it if i knew what it was. I've been there. I joined the USMC in 2003, and I asked for infantry. Everyone tried to talk me out of it. Mom cried repeatedly. I still don't know what you're supposed to say to a parent in that situation though.

I'd like to offer a couple of tips if it's not presuming too much.

With any luck at all, the occupation will be winding down not long after the elections in November, but not necessarily. Certain MOS (jobs) are in greater demand than others; I assume MPs would be one of them.
There is a pretty good chance your son will go to Iraq, and as an MP, it's not at all unlikely that he will be shot at, and have to shoot back.

I don't say that just to scare you though. There are things that I would recommend that you do for your son and yourself.

1. If you are religious, it is my experience that spirituality is a very strong asset under adversity. If you are not religious, at least having a philosophical outlook to rely on is good. This can help you deal with the stress of the situation, and is something you can offer your son to carry him through the experiences he will face.

2. Concern is one thing, worrying is another. If your son goes to Iraq, he's in some danger. It's hardly a death sentence. Most people come back alive and functional, most of my friends have been there. Most of them weren't fond of it, but they're OK. My old JROTC instructor just can't stop polishing his new Combat Infantry Badge- I think he's kind of glad his guard unit was sent.
You can't help being concerned I'm sure, but that doesn't mean you have to add to the stress of your son's situation by letting him know just how much you're worried. Be supportive.

3. Supporting a soldier but not the Commander in Chief.
Even if the war is awful, that doesn't mean that your son's actions in the war have to be. During the time when he's not actually fighting, your son has the opportunity to help the innocent who are there.

It's not Vietnam. We're not talking about your son running into unarmed villages and burning them down because the army is afraid the VC might use it later.
We're talking about your son making sure that other people's sons don't get murdered. We're talking about your son perhaps being in situations where his presence, as opposed to the presence of a less virtuous one, could save the lives of innocents who are caught in that conflict.

Now, maybe you think that all of that is just a cover for Bush's friends to get filthy rich. But what if that is what it's about? Does that diminish the fact that while your son cannot stop it by staying out, that he can make it work out at least ever so slightly for the better by going in and exercising the best of his judgement and doing everything he can to get himself and those around him home safe?



posted on Jan, 3 2006 @ 08:26 AM
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Originally posted by The Vagabond
Now, maybe you think that all of that is just a cover for Bush's friends to get filthy rich. But what if that is what it's about? Does that diminish the fact that while your son cannot stop it by staying out, that he can make it work out at least ever so slightly for the better by going in and exercising the best of his judgement and doing everything he can to get himself and those around him home safe?


Thanks for the advice, very useful indeed. I like what you said above as it what my thoughts are like. I see him as doing a good thing in bad situation.

Thanks.



posted on Jan, 3 2006 @ 09:04 AM
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Originally posted by godservant
According to his recruiter, he may (MAY!) go to Iraq,
but only to guard prisoners or other thing, but not to kill anyone.

EVERYONE in the Army is a soldier. It matters not what your
MOS (Job) is. I was a Chaplain Assistant. Even though I never
went to combat, if I had, I would have been expected to shoot
the enemy just as everyone else was. Even the fact that I
was a female didn't matter. I was assigned to 2nd Armored
Division - essentially a combat unit.

Going into the military and thinking that you can escape
killing enemy combatants is wrong. You can be called upon
to do that at any time.

However, I think Iraq is/will be winding down more. Those
just now going over, or going over this year, will not see
as much 'action' as those who went before them. IMHO


so I ask (especially other army folk), good move,
cautious move or bad move?


In my opinion the military is usually a good move for folks.
When you go in, you grow up. You become independent and
self sufficient. You receive good training and you serve your country.
Also - the college benefits are very good.

MP? Is AIT at Fort McClellen in Alabama? Going in the service
as an MP is a good career move for many people. While in
the service he can attend college and when he gets out he
can put on his resume both college AND Military Police. He
should be able to get a job with town police or go on to
the State Police Acadamy. Both are admirable professions.

Congratulations .... and thank you for your family's service
for our country.



[edit on 1/3/2006 by FlyersFan]



posted on Jan, 22 2006 @ 03:18 AM
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Firstly... DONT encourage him to join the armed forces... AMERICA DOES NOT NEED MORE MILITARY PAWNS!
The army is not the way to get into the police force... studying criminal law part-time whilst working as a security guard, is.

Originally I had gone through the selection process (successfully, mind you) of being signed into a Signals Operator: Linguist position with the Royal Australian Air Force, with officer training and all... then during the final examinations they asked me if I was okay with being assigned combat duty in Iraq... I asked them why, as I would be a linguist and not a combat specialist, they said "we ask everyone that question", I declined and thanked them for wasting my time, asking why they didn't just ask me to sign up as a damned GI instead, got no comment, and a stern frown.

To hell with the military, and shame on the parents that let their children go to fight an oil war of the elite, SHAME ON YOU!

[edit on 22-1-2006 by nrky]



posted on Jan, 22 2006 @ 05:33 AM
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My son just re-enlisted and is in the transportation part of the Army. He is also trained as a combat engineer. He has served as an active duty soldier, then he was called back from the reserves when Iraq started. After that active duty he was released from the Army and got married, started a family and was employed in a well paying job.

Now he is back as an active duty soldier stationed in Germany. He is 28 years old. And I am worried for him and all the other sons and daughters who are serving our country.

I AM NOT ASHAMED OF HIM OR MYSELF. He is the same honorable man who first joined as a younger man. He, my son, tells me that by serving his country he is giving you the right to spout your hatred. I can learn a lot from my son.

There are a lot of wonderful stories posted here on this thread about the military from the men and women who have served or are serving now. Do they sound as though they joined up just so they could go out and kill or torture?

I do pray for the men and women serving our country in the military and I also pray that we might have peace some day and that our young people will not have to risk their lives for the good of all.



posted on Jan, 23 2006 @ 09:53 PM
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Originally posted by nrky
To hell with the military, and shame on the parents that let their children go to fight an oil war of the elite, SHAME ON YOU!

[edit on 22-1-2006 by nrky]


Ya know what? I can understand that reaction. I also think very similarly. I do think we are in Iraq for it's oil.

My son also feels the same way.

However.....

He is one who believes that we as people should do something. And it is his hope that he can go into a dark place and shed a little light.

It is that reason I am proud of him.

I wouldn't want any of my other kids joining the military, but because it is him, he goes to fulfil some large purpose with integrety, honesty and wisdom.



posted on Jan, 23 2006 @ 10:32 PM
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Nrky- Shame on yourself.

I agree with your analysis of the war to a certain degree, but I find your way of expressing it more than a little immature.

Go on being self-righteous and shaming those who would put themselves at risk for the chance to try and make a bad situation just a bit better. Do what you've got to do to convince yourself that refusing to back your nation's play was the moral decision.

Consider however: EASY, PROFITABLE, OR RIGHT- Virtually no endeavor I can imagine can be more than two of those things. Which two would best apply to your decision?

And if you could be so bold as to answer a simple question: Would you refuse to rescue someone from a burning building because you disapproved of the building be set ablaze?


I joined the Marines because several of my best friends were being deployed- I was convinced at the time that 9/11 was an inside job- that wasn't the point. Good people were going into a big mess, and I thought I had something to offer them. Sounds like that's how this person's son sees it too.

Shame on us for what? If one of my fellow men ever asks me where I was while he was in Iraq, fighting for his life on account of Bush, I'll answer without a flinch. Will you?




posted on Jan, 23 2006 @ 10:38 PM
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Good for him.....I hope he stays safe.

The military is an excellent way for young folks to get their lives together and grow up, then as an adult decide whjat they want to do with their lives. Its kind of silly that we have 17 and 18 year olds going off to college to enroll in a major and start off on a career path.

Some are mature enough to do that......most aren't. Many get blown out of the water, trying to juggle a job, school and social activities. Its a sad story how many get a bad feel for school and leave.....setting in stone much of the career choices for the rest of their life.

I was a doctor in a student health center during my residency, and saw many kids too young to handle the pressure.

I was in the military during Viet Nam....(1966-1969) as a medic, and pharmacology instructor at Fort Sam. I came back, and college was a snap.
I doubt I was any smarter......but much wiser. The army is a great place to learn about life.

Your son will be in my thoughts



posted on Jan, 24 2006 @ 12:19 AM
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I have applied for the dutch army before but I was turned down since I could not do some of their test which no man could sufficiently do, IMHO, this was because I am a high school drop out...

I moved to America now with my wife, I am considdering the Army but only as a last resort, I am going for my GED and am planning in getting a college degree for something in the US Government like the FBI or another law-enforcement agency or maybe even inteligence.

I would try the Airforce first and if not the Airforce I will try to be in the Calvary like I was intending in the Dutch Army, but this is only if my desires for a government job are unatainable.

I am no a Permanent resident and I intend to get my US citizenship.

I wish your son the best of luck, the brave men and women that fight and serve in Iraq and Afghanistan are constantly on my mind and I hope they will be safe.

[edit on 24/1/2006 by GrOuNd_ZeRo]







 
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