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US Economy Outlook

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posted on Dec, 26 2005 @ 10:14 PM
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I will be making some investments soon and was curious about what others thought regarding the outlook for U.S. Economy for the next several years. Things such as what sectors of the economy will fare best, the interest rate hike, real estate market, oil and natural gas prices and foreign investment. Is the demand for consumer durables on the decline? I would like to hear your opinions.




posted on Dec, 26 2005 @ 10:29 PM
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Assuming here, but being you are considering making a serious investment of a significant amount of unmentioned dollars, would not your best bet be to talk to an experienced investment broker, who is in the know versus conjecture?





seekerof



posted on Dec, 26 2005 @ 10:33 PM
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Originally posted by Seekerof
Assuming here, but being you are considering making a serious investment of a significant amount of unmentioned dollars, would not your best bet be to talk to an experienced investment broker, who is in the know versus conjecture?


Yes, that would be logical, however I am planning to purchase these several stocks more for educational purposes rather than reaping profits. That's why I wanted to see what people thought on the matter.



posted on Dec, 26 2005 @ 10:35 PM
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Nanotech is hot, the Web is Hot yet again with Google Mania. Biotech is set to take of next decade(in my opinion). My advice would be to avoid these area's at this time.

Try to grab some broad Index Funds, so you don't make yourself vulnerable to volatility. Of course if you're a day trader that it's volatility you want and now would be a perfect time to make some decent scratch(but don't ask for advise as any advice you get wether from an "Amateur" or a "Professional" will be biased and could be leading you into a trap)



Assuming here, but being you are considering making a serious investment of a significant amount of unmentioned dollars, would not your best bet be to talk to an experienced investment broker, who is in the know versus conjecture?


According to whom? My last investment broker cost me over ten thousand bucks due to some bad advise he gave me(and I still had to pay him
), lets just say after that debacle I started to learn myself. Also there is very few "in the know" when talking about the Stock Market, it is ALL conjecture as far as I'm concerned. Even the best can get caught with their pants down(and do quite frequently)

Playing the markets is just a more serious form of Vegas Slots.

[edit on 26-12-2005 by sardion2000]



posted on Dec, 26 2005 @ 10:40 PM
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Originally posted by Liquidus

Originally posted by Seekerof
Assuming here, but being you are considering making a serious investment of a significant amount of unmentioned dollars, would not your best bet be to talk to an experienced investment broker, who is in the know versus conjecture?


Yes, that would be logical, however I am planning to purchase these several stocks more for educational purposes rather than reaping profits. That's why I wanted to see what people thought on the matter.


If you want a trail by fire invest in Nanotechnology or Biotechnology
You only learn by losing your pants from time to time.



posted on Dec, 26 2005 @ 11:20 PM
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Originally posted by sardion2000
According to whom?

According to me?





My last investment broker cost me over ten thousand bucks due to some bad advise he gave me(and I still had to pay him
), lets just say after that debacle I started to learn myself. Also there is very few "in the know" when talking about the Stock Market, it is ALL conjecture as far as I'm concerned. Even the best can get caught with their pants down(and do quite frequently)

I have had ups and downs myself, sardion2000, but your experience does not relate to the entirety, does it, being you are simply giving your own experiences? Key word here: your experiences. Bad advice is something that simply comes when investing in the stock market, being it is speculative to say the least.

I did not relate my own experiences nor will I other than what I have, but I will refute what you have said, because my experiences have been rather pleasurable, as well as profitable. It is virtually all educated and speculative luck anyhow. You simply increase your odds or luck with someone more in the know then with those who are not.






seekerof

[edit on 26-12-2005 by Seekerof]



posted on Dec, 27 2005 @ 09:12 AM
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Originally posted by sardion2000
Nanotech is hot, the Web is Hot yet again with Google Mania. Biotech is set to take of next decade(in my opinion). My advice would be to avoid these area's at this time.

Try to grab some broad Index Funds, so you don't make yourself vulnerable to volatility. Of course if you're a day trader that it's volatility you want and now would be a perfect time to make some decent scratch(but don't ask for advise as any advice you get wether from an "Amateur" or a "Professional" will be biased and could be leading you into a trap)


I agree with you, ultimately what it comes down to is how much risk you are willing to take. Google and Apple would fall under the high risk category(Although I had a friend who made about 6k from Apple last month). Google is so through the roof right now, it's hard to see anyone buying it. The higher the risks, the better the rewards. I will probably play it safe though and shoot for a more stable long-term investment, buy low- sell high. Biotech might be something worth looking into. Anyhow, thanks for the advice.




[edit on 27-12-2005 by Liquidus]



posted on Dec, 29 2005 @ 09:21 PM
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I think i'd invest some good horticulture knowledge, since growing your own food will be the new "in thing" when everything comes a-crashing down real soon. Am I living on the same earth as you guys? Or even the same country? What the Fed did on November 10th was not simply getting rid of a rather outmoded measure of the money supply, it also hid a key tool that would show that we are monetizing our current account deficit.

The discontinuation of M3 reports is a relatively minor matter compared to growth in areas of the U.S. payments system that are not regulated by the Fed and not well monitored by them. But it is unsettling. It detracts from the transparency the Fed preaches and adds to the suspicion that the Fed wants to hide anything showing money growth high enough to fuel inflation, just so people won't know how bad it is and possibly react and thus make it worse.

Foreign investors are just lining up to buy up our T-bills, through the loosely regulated hedge fund system that is absolutely a money launderer's delight. And when we begin making it a policy to open up our borders to illegal immigrants so that we help prop up our economy with the cheap labor and such, you know things are going to take a turn for the worse.

According to published reports, about 80 percent of the global hedge funds are registered with the Cayman Islands Monetary Authority. During the first half of 2005, the number of Cayman Island’s registered hedge fund operators rose from 5,932 to 6,527. - Hedgeco

And this was all going on before Katrina... tsk tsk

A quick crash course on what's really going on with our economy can be found on Mark Watson's site, under American Issues, titled The Coming Economic Depression. They're a series, with this being the latest.





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