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Aircraft with strange protrusion (photos)

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posted on Dec, 23 2005 @ 12:34 PM
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My theory on that point is that it is mounted out of the disturbed airflow to better measure the efficiency of the cowl and pylon in their own right.




posted on Dec, 23 2005 @ 09:45 PM
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I doubt it’s a live test of an engine its way to close to the cockpit to be live its probably a next generation jamming system or sensor package



posted on Dec, 24 2005 @ 12:12 AM
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No one would put a nacelle that close to the forward fuselage and then direct flow back over the wing like that. Twisting moment on the station frames and acoustics/jetwash effects on the skin panels would be /tremendous/ (no windows aft of /any/ turbine engine). While who knows what the combined flow effect over the wingroot panel would be. My guess is USB gone wild.

Also, as others have mentioned, there appears to be a shock cone protruding but nothing in the way of a fan or even separation panel which could take indicate an engine fant front insert as being possible. Given the width of the duct and cowling overall, I'm also suspicious of the utility of the installation in testing reasonable bpr engines (even a commuter/bizjet) built after 1960. At best, that looks like something to test scaled components in a freestream (windmill) environment to check 'natural' flow conditions on particular bladeforms. And that's what we have CFD for.

My personal guess is some kind of atmospheric sampling mission (the B707 and 717 actually have pretty good top out around 50K). Either for pollutants in support of global warming studies or whatever else NASA is recording them for these days.

Or for specific chemical indicators related to 'processes unpleasant'.

It could even be a testbed for contrail characterization or contrail suppression techniques.

Last I checked, Honeywell was into munitions and avionics related items. I think they may have a subsidiary that does the 1042/F124/125 engines but even those would not really be viable for testing in that installation.

'The Larger The Print, THE BIGGER THE LIE...' is pretty common in misinformation circles and it doesn't get much more deliberate than having letters readable through a zoom-distant telephoto shot.


KPl.



posted on Dec, 24 2005 @ 06:52 AM
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It's a chem-trail sprayer! IT'S A CHEMTRAIL SPRAYER I TELL YA!...

But seriously, FredT nailed it, well atleast he figured out what aircraft it was, but what is the purpose of this testbed? I do like the idea of a power-generator pod though and I agree that would be an awkward place for a jet engine.



posted on Dec, 24 2005 @ 08:04 AM
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It's not the only aircraft used to test engines in this position

See this link

PW www.jetphotos.net...



posted on Dec, 25 2005 @ 11:44 PM
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ok listen that is not the same thing. That is a wingtip engine on a canard there is a similar one on the other side. The one on the original picture is attached to a very unsupported spot where this picture either has a support structure running through the plane or under it. That is one of the reasons why they just don’t attach engines every witch place b/c they need to be supported.



posted on Dec, 26 2005 @ 02:16 AM
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There is no engines on the other side


www.jetphotos.net...

This aircraft has been used to test a Variety of engines. Even on the nose.

[edit on 26-12-2005 by ajsr71]



posted on Dec, 26 2005 @ 03:16 AM
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Thanks AJSR71


Doesn't P&W Canada make many smaller jet engines for all sorts of jet prototypes like the ARES?



posted on Dec, 26 2005 @ 03:31 AM
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Originally posted by GrOuNd_ZeRo
Thanks AJSR71


Doesn't P&W Canada make many smaller jet engines for all sorts of jet prototypes like the ARES?


Not up all that up to date on Civilian enginges GZERO. But I suppose they do ,just like Honeywell.

If you look at that PW picture and go to the links at the bottom you will see the aircrafts Registation Number . click on that link to see other pictures and some other enginge mods flown , also notice the mods to the enginge pylons.



posted on Dec, 26 2005 @ 10:06 AM
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So... Is the legend of the extra aircraft appendage solved?



posted on Dec, 26 2005 @ 10:55 AM
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Originally posted by kilcoo316
I very much doubt it is an engine - even with the above photo.

You cannot just mount an engine on to the fuselage, there is no piping, the structures are not there to deal with the forces etc etc.

It doesn't make sense to me for it to be an engine - more likely an electronic based pod (be it radar/laser etc etc).


Depending on the type of tests being made there would be no problem with mounting an engine on that location. It wouldn't take much to add an internal fuel tank to supply a test engine. As far as structure is concerned that is one of the stronger areas on the aircraft. That position would also have the advantage of being closest to the centerline thus reducing asymmetrical thrust.



posted on Dec, 26 2005 @ 11:01 AM
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Another Picture of N720GT This time with the cowling open.

www.airliners.net...


ALAN



posted on Dec, 30 2005 @ 12:34 AM
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lazer any one could it be one?



posted on Dec, 30 2005 @ 12:57 AM
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Originally posted by fellowconspire
lazer any one could it be one?



Hmmmmm perhaps you are refering to a Laser


Also, I would like you to welcome you to the thread and invite you to actually read and look at the numerous pictures posted explaining what this is.



posted on Dec, 30 2005 @ 01:00 AM
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The protrusion has been positively identified...


Thread closed.



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