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Was Dave Chappelle Taken Down by Oprah and Co?

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posted on Feb, 2 2006 @ 04:54 AM
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people do make money on shows in the Can. Because they can hold the power of SHOWING the show, some time... some where. Whether they ever do or not. And at every lull in CD and DVD sells, some exec will say "We might release the Unseen Shows of Chapelle!" and CD and DVD sales will again rise.

So those with a vested interest in the Royalties will make money on this forever, like those with a stake in Elvis.

Marketing. Easiest thing on earth. You don't even have to have a product to sell stuff.




posted on Feb, 3 2006 @ 07:07 AM
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i won't even address the misogynist, racist tone this thread had taken because I think BradKellBrrexkl handled that quite nicely...

On topic, I would hope that if a group of powerful blacks got together for anything, it would be something more important that Dave Chapelle.

Having said that, I wouldn't put it past them. From what I have only just figured out, it seems that Cosby and Oprah, et al are the self-appointed stewards of the black Americans' reputation, at least when it comes to big money...they don't care what Bob Johnson puts on his network (perhaps because he's one of them?), but when a black entertainer starts to make real money, I believe its understood that they've been 'vetted' in some way by someone in that group.

For example, when Jamie Fox won, he thanked Oprah. Now, personally, I wouldn't have thought that the guy who made 'Booty Call' would even be in Oprah's radar, but, judging by his behavior, they were old friends. Not that I watch Oprah enough to know whether he'd ever been on or not, never did.

I definitely will watch that show on Feb 3, though...then we'll see if there's a cover-up, because I, too, find it suspicious that he's gonna be on there, especially after his whole "I'm Oprah's Baby Daddy" skit.



posted on Feb, 3 2006 @ 09:15 AM
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o.p. by BradKellBrrexkl
To make it to the utmost upper echelon one must be devious. You can't make it to the top otherwise.


Make it to the top of what, the dungheap?

Why do so many people want to be King (or Black Queen, for all those concerned about mysoginistic racism) Turd of Poop Mountain when they know it involves the complete compromise of all the moral values that make us worthwhile as human beings to begin with? Is your 15 minutes of fame that big a deal, that you would virtually sell your soul to the devil to achieve it? Many do, and it is true that those at the top of the dungheap surely have.

When a for real (dude) like DC comes along and gets noticed for keeping it real, and making it funny, all of a sudden all the sellouts at the top of the dungheap start looking over their shoulders getting worried about being exposed for what they are, sellouts. So they bring the heat, lots of it, to shut him down, or make him change his ways, and become just like them, a sellout.

It just makes me want to go and take a big dump.



posted on Feb, 3 2006 @ 09:45 AM
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Chappelle sets a new precident today on Oprah. He has no shows upcoming, there's nothing to promote other than an appearance on the Actors Studio [odd for a guy who has been at best a third level sidekick in most films]. He 's going on Oprah so she can help him explain to America why after being in the business since he was seventeen suddenly has his comedic brain lock up when offered $50 million.Ya right!

Thanks Oprah, for helping America understand!



posted on Feb, 3 2006 @ 01:42 PM
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more news on chappelle

contactmusic.com... scared by success_03_02_2006



posted on Feb, 3 2006 @ 06:44 PM
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Originally posted by Icarus Rising

When a for real (dude) like DC comes along and gets noticed for keeping it real, and making it funny, all of a sudden all the sellouts at the top of the dungheap start looking over their shoulders getting worried about being exposed for what they are, sellouts. So they bring the heat, lots of it, to shut him down, or make him change his ways, and become just like them, a sellout.

It just makes me want to go and take a big dump.


I would have to agree with you on that. Take Bill Cosby, #1 sell- out: I don't know anybody who has laughed at a Bill Cosby joke in about 20 years, and yet, he's like, 'the guardian at the door' for all black comedians. I just dont get it.



posted on Feb, 3 2006 @ 07:10 PM
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Not to mention the way he's been slamming black youth lately. I think DC's humor goes a lot farther than Cos' condemnation in helping address and alleviate the issues faced by today's youth.



posted on Feb, 3 2006 @ 09:17 PM
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Originally posted by Icarus Rising
Not to mention the way he's been slamming black youth lately. I think DC's humor goes a lot farther than Cos' condemnation in helping address and alleviate the issues faced by today's youth.


Absolutely right.... Bill Cosby, and his generation, seem to think everything is ok in race relations, now that we all use the same metaphorical water fountain, but the issues haven't gone away. They've just become more nuanced.

And whether Cosby knows, or cares, most young black people are completely disgusted with him, his opinion, and his 'comedy,' for lack of a better word. I say he puts his money where his mouth is and, instead of giving to black colleges, try to help the kids who don't get that opportunity...



posted on Feb, 4 2006 @ 09:36 AM
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I have followed Dave's career and was a fan long before his show on Comedy Central. The person I saw on Oprah seemed to be very out of sorts. He was struggling for words and seemed to be delicately uttering everything. The person I'm used to seeing in sketches and interviews is rapid fire with no hesitation, cocky and crisp. Anyone else notice this?



posted on Feb, 4 2006 @ 11:29 AM
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Originally posted by YIAWETA
Anyone else notice this?


I got the impression that the whole, stilted conversation, I was reading between the lines, to decode him. The thing is, he and Oprah were having a very sensitive conversation about, again, this is reading between the lines, but it sounded like a conversation about white people, and not in a 'it's all jokes' kinda way. Two very rich black people were sitting there, having a talk on national tv, about how to keep white people out of your money.

I know some people are going to be offended at how I phrased that, but I'm just figuring it out myself, so bear with me.

Close to the end of the show, they started talking about keeping 'the people around you out of your pockets' (roughly paraphrased). Now, I don't think there are many high- level black producers and directors (or managers, etc) out there, and out of the five that exist (kidding!), I doubt they're all working on the Oprah or Chapelle Show. So, I would assume they were talking about white people (again, sorry to say it like that) who worked closely with him.

It seemed like Oprah, more experienced, was actually teaching him to handle his money, right there on tv.

I'm sure everybody else got something totally different from the same show, so let's discuss!



posted on Feb, 4 2006 @ 11:53 AM
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Hottie you may be right , I don't know. I do feel as though someone or something has gotten into his head and he appears to be affraid. The $50 million contract IMO, validated his raucous type of humor that the likes of Cosby and Oprah felt needed controlling. Cosby chimed in back in the mid 80"s when Eddie Murphy's Raw came out. Cos does consider himself to be a custodian of sorts for black entertainers. Dave really is just too free with his comedy in an age of ever diminishing civil rights.



posted on Feb, 4 2006 @ 09:18 PM
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When your 15 minutes of fame can span over 20 years and over $100,000,000 dollars, plenty of people would sell soul and more.

It's a matter of perception. You see people like that as fools, unaware or unconcerned with the TRUE life.

They see people like you (not a slander) as fools, unaware or unconcerned with monatary value and prestige.

It's all in how you look at things. Yes, many people on this planet would gladly back stab, both literal and figuretive, to get up the next rung of the ladder. Even in such nobel pursuits and Religion, Philosophy, and Science.



posted on Feb, 5 2006 @ 09:57 AM
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Absolutely. The practice is pervasive, cannot be supported, and its days are numbered and few. Time, and the right hand of God, will tell who the fools are.

I didn't watch the show, so I can't comment on the dialogue between DC and Oprah. I can say, in support of HH's comment, that there was scandalous talk a few years back about how none of the producers or key staff on Oprah's show were blacks or minorities.



posted on Feb, 5 2006 @ 06:05 PM
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Originally posted by HarlemHottie
So, I would assume they were talking about white people (again, sorry to say it like that) who worked closely with him.


What's to apologise for? Dave is black, I am white, that's not a racial insult, it's the truth...(my wife is South-East Asian, before anybody says anything, and just take a look at my Avatar...) I have no problem with describing a guy as black or him describing me as white (as in "Yo, where the white women at?"), I even find "whitey" funny in the right context (ie the Blues Brothers), but when it's used as the black equivalent of ni@@er I find it pathetic (although not offensive, the beauty of being white is there are no effective racial slurs!) on the same level as a white person using the word ni@@er. (Although the funniest thing I have ever seen is a one-word quote from The Kentucky Fried Movie).

So, to recap, (perhaps with some clarity!) "white" is not offensive.



posted on Feb, 5 2006 @ 07:01 PM
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Originally posted by HowlrunnerIV

Originally posted by HarlemHottie
So, I would assume they were talking about white people (again, sorry to say it like that) who worked closely with him.


What's to apologise for?

So, to recap, (perhaps with some clarity!) "white" is not offensive.


Well, 'course not!
I was trying to be sensitive to those who feel the 'white man' is blamed for everything. He is, and I could see how that would seem unfair, but sometimes, it is a legititimate claim.

Its really a personal thing, too, though: I hate telling stories where you're like, the white guy was like this, and the black guy was like this... It sounds so dumb, like you couldn't think of another descriptive word.

[edit on 5-2-2006 by HarlemHottie]



posted on Feb, 5 2006 @ 10:49 PM
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How about Honky? As in, "You white Honky!" Is that funny, or offensive? I guess its a reference to how white folks talk out their noses, you know, Yankee style (and the whole Yankee thing, I mean Yankee what?, its like a Chinaman trying to accuse you of jacking off. "You Yankee! Buffet Close! No more Cream of Some Young Guy for you!" Ba Dump-bump! (Cymbal sound!)).

I truly believe those at the top of the dungheap love racism, because they practice Social Darwinism. It surprises me not that Oprah may have been sitting there going, "Now Dave, you gots to learn how to keep whitey outs a yo pockets (paraphrase)." Dividing those below them on the Social Darwinism Scale (bank balance) helps keeps thems on tops, don'ts youse sees!" Having everyone feel guilty about who they are for some reason or another is the flip side, don't you know?

That, my friends, is the nature of the beast. And the beast is not Oprah, but it possesses her, don't you see. And everyone else on top of the dungheap, and everyone else trying to scramble their way up! It has nothing to do with the color of your skin, or the culture you grew up in. It has everything to do, as MLK said so righteously, with the content of your character (soul).

God, show us how to deliver ourselves (by grace through faith) from the dungheap.

That is my prayer for all of us tonight. Thank you, and goodnight. You've been a great audience.



posted on Feb, 5 2006 @ 10:49 PM
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I thought on Last Laugh '05, they had a little promo piece about Season 3 of The Chappelle Show coming back at the end of January?

I was unable to catch Dave on Oprah so I don't know if he covered why it still isn't on.

Does anyone else know why it hasn't returned?



posted on Feb, 6 2006 @ 06:19 PM
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Originally posted by Icarus Rising
How about Honky? As in, "You white Honky!"


Honky and Cracker are just funny. As I said, the beauty of being white is that there are no effective racial slurs.

In Oz the (ethnic) Chinese attempted to call us "Skips", it's a reference to a very old tv show, think Lassie with a Kangaroo, it didn't work, we just laughed at it. Think of how many insults there are for non Anglo-Saxon peoples and how insulted they get, compare that with caucasions...

I just find African-American to be crap. My son is Khmer-Australian (or Eurasian), he is even Cambodian-Australian, but that hs to do with his "mixed" blood and where he was born. African-American? How many of them (or their parents) were born in Africa, does a guy with dreads who smoke ganga, listens to Marley and says "Mon" consider himself African-American? How about Afro-Carribean?



posted on Feb, 6 2006 @ 06:28 PM
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Well firstly i dont know if chappelle would want to go on oprahs show if she put a gun to his head?
I saw the interview and found it very intresting, yes they were talking about how to keep the "white man" out of their money, but did anyone else find it intresting about how everyone was telling him that he was "crazy" trying to give him pills. I can see why he was worried.
Also how about how he said he was a "conspiracy theorist" and was talking about how every black comedian has worn a dress, i had never thought of that.



posted on Feb, 6 2006 @ 09:14 PM
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Originally posted by Icarus Rising
I truly believe those at the top of the dungheap love racism


I really and truly doubt that...ask Oprah how much she loved being shut out of Hermes.


Originally posted by Icarus Rising
Having everyone feel guilty about who they are for some reason or another is the flip side, don't you know?


If, by "everyone feeling guilty about who they are," you mean feeling like you bear any amount of guilt for some universal wrong, I don't think that would apply to everyone. I don't have anything to feel "guilty" about.


Originally posted by HowlrunnerIV
I just find African-American to be crap. My son is Khmer-Australian (or Eurasian), he is even Cambodian-Australian, but that hs to do with his "mixed" blood and where he was born. African-American? How many of them (or their parents) were born in Africa[?]


So, how many generations removed do you have to be to acknowledge your heritage?

I usually don't use 'African-American' myself. I prefer 'black American' because I don't personally feel any connection to Africa, but I know a lot of people who travel back and forth from there who do feel that connection. So it is a little unfair to set a time limit on it.

Sometimes, I think the term 'African- American' applies to a more of a cultural connection, as opposed to a literal one. From music, to dance, to language, I must admit we are a very 'African' people.

Also, considering the fact that a lot of us have African, European, and Native ancestry, we are 'African-American' in a very real sense, a combination of all the groups who built this country.


Originally posted by HowlrunnerIV
does a guy with dreads who smoke ganga, listens to Marley and says "Mon" consider himself African-American? How about Afro-Carribean?


All the West Indian people I know refer to their nationality as their family's point of origin, even if they were born here. So, one of my ex-boyfriends referred to himself as "Trini[dadian]", although he was born and raised in Brooklyn.

On topic...


Originally posted by wang
but did anyone else find it intresting about how everyone was telling him that he was "crazy" trying to give him pills. I can see why he was worried.
Also how about how he said he was a "conspiracy theorist" and was talking about how every black comedian has worn a dress, i had never thought of that.


Ooooh, yes, I did notice that! He also said, you can't be a black man in America without some degree of paranoia. Even crazier, Oprah looked like she agreed with him!

That certainly was an interesting interview.



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