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The latest X projects...

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posted on Dec, 16 2005 @ 01:44 PM
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This is just a short thread about a couple of NASAs latest X projects...

The X-32

A prototype fighter plane manufactured by Boeing, It is supposed to be stealthy, and it is pretty similar to the F-22.



The X-33

A large reusable next generation space-shuttle manufacured by NASA and Lockheed Martin. This shuttle should repalce the current fleet of NASAs space shuttles.



X-34

A sub-orbital reusable rocket plane manufactured by NASA and Orbital Sciences.



X-36

Defenelty a part of the next generation fighter (USA). The X-36 is a small tail-less (better stealth capabilities) fighter manufctured by NASA.



X-38

A "space life boat" manufactured by NASA. It is supposed to be an alternative crew returning vechile in the future.



X-37

And experimental test plane to test reusable launch vechile technologies.



X-43

Maybe the next "Aurora"? The X-43 is supposed to be an aeronautical hypersonic engine vechile.



Source

www.cnn.com...




posted on Dec, 16 2005 @ 02:14 PM
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Mods please remove
Double post


[edit on 16-12-2005 by northwolf]



posted on Dec, 16 2005 @ 02:16 PM
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X-32 was/is a prototype of JSF if i'm correct?

The X-36 is scaled down, remote controlled demonstrator for tailless stealth



X-43 is a testbed for scramjet engine, it's supposed to become fastest air-breathing craft in the world, reaching speeds of Mach 7-10




posted on Dec, 16 2005 @ 02:20 PM
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I wonder what that circular hole/recess behind the cockpit of the X-32 is for? R2-D2?

- Attero

[edit on 16-12-2005 by Attero Auctorita]



posted on Dec, 16 2005 @ 02:28 PM
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I assume the hole in X-32 is the lift fan, since the plane is VTOL/STOVL
It creates lift to allow the plane to hoover (not sure how well) like a Harrier



posted on Dec, 16 2005 @ 02:54 PM
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That photo is not the X-32. I dunno what it is but it isn't the X-32.

THIS is the X-32;



Also the X-32 doesn't use a lift fan, it uses vectoring nozzles like the Harriers but they are hidden away during forward flight.

[edit on 16-12-2005 by waynos]



posted on Dec, 16 2005 @ 02:55 PM
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Originally posted by northwolf
I assume the hole in X-32 is the lift fan, since the plane is VTOL/STOVL
It creates lift to allow the plane to hoover (not sure how well) like a Harrier


Ah, that makes sense, thanks.



posted on Dec, 16 2005 @ 03:03 PM
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My gut is telling that the future of aircraft will go the way of either UAVs [UCAVs] and the likes of the X-36, one hot baby that has me taking a deep breath every time I see it.

I am in love...*inhales deeply*

*sigh*





seekerof



posted on Dec, 16 2005 @ 03:32 PM
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Originally posted by Figher Master FIN
This is just a short thread about a couple of NASAs latest X projects...

Source

www.cnn.com...


This post is rather outdated since just about every project mentioned has either been completed or cancelled. Even the source cited is over six years old.

The X-32

The picture you show is not the X-32 that was ultimately built. The X-32 was originally supposed to be a Short Takeoff and Landing (STOVL) test vehicle funded by the Adbanced Research Project Agency (ARPA). The effort was called the Common Affordable Lightweight Fighter (CALF) and its purpose was to explore the feasability of a single fighter that could be built in different versions for various services. The plane that was to be built was a supersonic STOVL aircraft, and I believe the photo you posted is an early concept for what that plane would have looked like. Instead, CALF was merged with several other efforts resulting in the far more ambitious Joint Strike Fighter program. Whereas CALF was only intended to be a concept demonstration, JSF became a competition between two companies to build a production aircraft.

www.aerospaceweb.org...

The X-32 designation was given to Boeing's entry in the JSF project, which ultimately bore only a superficial resemblance to the picture shown. The X-32 did not use a lift fan for STOVL flight but instead adopted thrust vectoring nozzles similar to those used on the Harrier.

www.aerospaceweb.org...
www.aerospaceweb.org...

The other X plane designation re-used for JSF was the X-35. This designation was originally supoosed to be used for a concept demonstration of advanced fighter concepts. It was then given instead to the Lockheed Martin entry in the JSF project. This version was declared the winner of a production contract in 2001 and is known as the F-35. The first F-35 is due to be completed in 2006.

www.aerospaceweb.org...
www.aerospaceweb.org...

The X-32 and X-35 were purely test aircraft, and neither one has flown since 2001 when the "competition" between them ended.

The X-33

The X-33 was cancelled in 2001. It was about 75% complete at the time, but it was decided that the project had grown far too expensive and was not going to meet its performance goals. The incomplete test vehicle is in storage at Lockheed's factory in Palmdale, California. There were rumors in 2001-2002 that Congress might approve additional funding to complete the vehicle and have it tested by the Air Force, but this never happened.

www.aerospaceweb.org...

X-34

The X-34 was also cancelled by NASA at the same time as the X-33. This reusable launch vehicle concept had also become too expensive to complete was deemed unable to meet its specifications.

www.space.com...

X-36

The X-36 was an unmanned, subscale test vehicle designed to test control systems for tailless aircraft. Its original test program was completed in 1997 and a supplemental series of flights wrapped up in 1998. The plane has since been donated to the Air Force Museum in Ohio.

www.aerospaceweb.org...

X-38

X-38 test flights began in 1997, but these were only captive flights conducted with the test vehicle attached to the B-52 mother plane. The X-38 made its first free flight in 1998. A total of eight flights were conducted through the end of 2001 when additional funding for the program was cancelled.

www.dfrc.nasa.gov...
www.geocities.com...

X-37

The X-37 appears to be in limbo. It was oriignally a NASA project but was later transferred to the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) in 2003. Funding was cut back severely and it is unclear when or if any test flights will be conducted.

www.designation-systems.net...
www.space.com...

X-43

The X-43 program is complete. Three test flights were attempted. The first failed in 2001 because of a design flaw in the rocket booster. A Mach 6.8 flight was successfully conducted in March 2004 and a Mach 9.6 test flight occurred in November 2004. No further tests of the X-43A are planned.

NASA and the USAF also have plans to build more advanced versions called the X-43B, X-43C, and X-43D. The X-43C had since been cancelled. The status of the B and D is not as clear. They may still be in the early stages of development, but it sounds like they have been suspended, if not cancelled altogether.

en.wikipedia.org...
www.aerospace-technology.com...



posted on Dec, 16 2005 @ 04:05 PM
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Originally posted by Figher Master FIN
This is just a short thread about a couple of NASAs latest X projects...

The X-32

A prototype fighter plane manufactured by Boeing, It is supposed to be stealthy, and it is pretty similar to the F-22.

I like the new X-32, at least they gave the thing a 'nose job'. The first one was UGLY!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!.

area51specialprojects.com...

The X-43 as the next Aurora?, Id rather prefer the Black Triangle than the X-43



[edit on 16-12-2005 by Browno]



posted on Dec, 16 2005 @ 04:31 PM
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Here is a site with links about all the known X planes, including the REAL "latest X projects"...

www.globalsecurity.org...

X-39

The X-39 is believed to be part of the Air Force's Future Aircraft Technology Enhancements (FATE) program. The purpose of FATE is apparently to build a subscale, unmanned aircraft to test advanced concepts for future combat aircraft. Very little is known about this effort.

X-40

The X-40 is a test vehicle related to the X-37 discussed in the previous post.

X-41

The X-41 Common Aero Vehicle (CAV) is said to be an unmanned military spaceplane project. It is believed to be an effort to build a maneuverable entry vehicle, but very little is known about the classified program.

X-42

The X-42 Pop-Up Upper Stage is an experimental expendable liquid rocket motor upper stage.

X-44

The X-44 MANTA (Multi-Axis No-Tail Aircraft) has been floating around forever but it is unclear whether or not it will ever fly. The goal of the project is to convert an F-22 test aircraft into a tailless delta-winged vehicle with thrust-vectoring nozzles. The effort would build on the earlier X-36 to explore the ability of advanced thrust vectoring and control systems to maintain controllability of a tailless aircraft.

X-45

The X-45 is a Boeing UCAV built primarily for the Air Force as part of the J-UCAS program. The X-45A has been successfully tested from 2001 to 2005. The X-45B was originally supposed to be an enlarged version more representative of a production vehicle, but it was cancelled in favor of the X-45C. The X-45C is even larger and can carry almost 5,000 lb payloads over 2,000 nm. The X-45C should start flight testing in 2007.

www.darpa.mil...
www.designation-systems.net...

X-46

The X-46 was another Boeing effort to build a version of its X-45 for the Navy. This project was later cancelled once its requirements were merged with those of the X-45C.

X-47

The X-47 is also part of the J-UCAS program. This UCAV is built by Northrop primarily for the Navy. The X-47A completed testing in 2003 to evaluate automatic landing systems that might one day allow UAVs to land aboard ships at sea. The X-47B is a much larger version comparable to the X-45C. Flight testing of the X-47B is not due to start until 2007 or 2008.

www.darpa.mil...
www.designation-systems.net...

X-48

The X-48 is an unmanned subscale version of Boeing's Blended Wing Body concept. It is due to fly in 2006.

X-49

The X-49 is a modified H-60 helicopter designed to test a Vectored Thrust Ducted Propeller propulsion system. I believe it is already in flight testing or soon will be.

en.wikipedia.org...

X-50

The Canard Rotor Wing (CRW) is an unmanned vehicle designed to test a unique helicopter concept. The rotor is turned using engine exhaust and can also be stopped in flight to convert into a fixed wing. The craft made its first flight in 2003 and is still undergoing testing.

www.boeing.com...

X-31

This one is now complete, but deserves an honorable mention

The X-31 project started during the 1980s to build a three-dimensional thrust vectoring test aircraft. The plane completed a variety of tests during the 1990s before NASA retired the vehicle. The Navy later took the aircraft to conduct tests on reducing landing length under the Vectoring Extremely Short Takeoff and Landing Control Tailless Operation Research (VECTOR) effort from 2001 to 2003.

www.nasa.gov...
www.news.navy.mil...


[edit on 16-12-2005 by aerospaceweb]



posted on Dec, 16 2005 @ 09:35 PM
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There hasn't been very many new X projects.

and all the current ones have all been talked about before.

Is the X-50 still the highest "X" number plane?



Its only flown vertical so far, it hasn't yet made its in-flight transition, from helicopter to plane yet.

[edit on 16-12-2005 by Murcielago]



posted on Dec, 16 2005 @ 10:06 PM
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The "X-32" pictured in the original post was a mock-up of Lockheed Martin's proposal for a Joint Strike Fighter prototype. They rolled it out at Palmdale under the unofficial designation X-32. Ultimately, Boeing officially received the X-32 designator for its JSF and Lockheed Martin got X-35.

Interestingly, the Crew Return Vehicle demonstrator was referred to in early documents as X-35, but was ultimately given the official designator X-38.



posted on Dec, 17 2005 @ 04:24 AM
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Originally posted by waynos
That photo is not the X-32. I dunno what it is but it isn't the X-32.

THIS is the X-32;



Also the X-32 doesn't use a lift fan, it uses vectoring nozzles like the Harriers but they are hidden away during forward flight.

[edit on 16-12-2005 by waynos]



Yes, so it seems... I've seen that plane before, strange taht I couldn't remember the name... Wasn't it a testing model for the F-35...??



posted on Dec, 17 2005 @ 11:37 AM
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It wasn't a test model for the X-35. It was just a mock-up of the Lockheed Martin JSF proposal. For ome reason they called it X-32.

When the Air force assigned X designations to the two JSF competitors, Lockheed Martin got X-35 and Boeing ended up with X-32.

It leads to some confusion.



posted on Dec, 17 2005 @ 12:49 PM
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AAAH, Thanks for the correction... But you have to admit that it's good that they didn't end up with the X-32... It isn't so good looking is it...



posted on Dec, 17 2005 @ 04:03 PM
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Please do at least some searching/research before you just start posting.



posted on Dec, 18 2005 @ 09:56 PM
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Originally posted by NWguy83
Please do at least some searching/research before you just start posting.


Agreed... the JSF Marine Variant DOES use a lift fan...



posted on Dec, 19 2005 @ 06:00 AM
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Originally posted by RealisticPatriot

Originally posted by NWguy83
Please do at least some searching/research before you just start posting.


Agreed... the JSF Marine Variant DOES use a lift fan...


Did anyone say it doesn't?

I (and at least one other) only said the X-32 doesn't, not the chosen JSF, which was the X-35.



posted on Dec, 19 2005 @ 07:02 AM
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OK guys, this first picture is Lockheeds 86% model of advanced ASTOVL proposal, built with shape of Model 140. There also existed some SSPM - Smale Scale Powered Models. The scale was choosen because used engine F100 was 86 % of size of proposed F119. Model 140 did a basis for Model 160 and it was a basis for F-35 JSFlink

Designation X-32 was to be used for ASTOVL/SSF demonstrator, but Lockheeds model did not have it. It was just model 140 and ASTOVL engine system testbed.




The remaining two secret X planes are X-41CAV Common Aero Vehicle and OSC X-42 RAST - Reusable Acess to Space Technology. more X-41 pictures more X-42 pictures







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