It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

A Pole Shift is Coming

page: 1
1
<<   2  3 >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Dec, 13 2005 @ 08:20 PM
link   
if the rosden ice shelf on the antarctic continent were to drift out into the south atlantic for 60 miles, there would be an immense polar shift along with earthquakes, tsunamis, and climate changes.

the rosden ice shelf annually recieves the most snow on the antarctic continent. this also means that one side of the continent is much heavier than the other. if the ice shelf eventually became too heavy, the ice shelf would drift out to sea, and at 26 hours be far enuff out to shift the balnce of poles and cause a massive worldwide annihalation that would wipe out 99 percent of all life on the Earth.



Im done so go ahead and poke holes in my claims.

Mod edit:
Please do not do your titles in all caps.

[edit on 13-12-2005 by parrhesia]




posted on Dec, 13 2005 @ 08:23 PM
link   
Hey everyone, its Mr Chicklestick, the Lt General! Is this more classified USAF material you are sharing with us?



posted on Dec, 13 2005 @ 08:41 PM
link   
You may be on to something. I am just going by things that I have researched. I have heard stories that all of the glaciers are melting and this could cause the world to "tip upside down". The solar heating around the equator of the Earth causes a rise in ocean temperatures. The warm water flows northward towards the cooler regions of the planet. Once there, it's heat is drawn out into the cooler arctic waters. The now cool water sinks and flows back to the equator. This constant flow of warm water north and cool water south is a continual cycle that keeps the earth at a consistant balance. The problem is that with all the greenhouse gasses and with the Earth in one of its naturally warming periods many of the glaciers are melting. When ice melts into the ocean it releases a lot of fresh water into the oceans salt water. Fresh water is less dense than salt water and is not able to sink. So, the warm water coming from the equator is not able to cool and return southward towards the center of the earth. This flow of temperature balancing water is shut down. This would cast us into a deep freeze.



posted on Dec, 13 2005 @ 08:45 PM
link   
You are right about one thing. There is a pole shift coming.

Shifting Magnetic Pole.



posted on Dec, 13 2005 @ 10:33 PM
link   

Originally posted by Mr Chiclestick
if the rosden ice shelf on the antarctic continent were to drift out into the south atlantic for 60 miles, there would be an immense polar shift along with earthquakes, tsunamis, and climate changes.

A pole shift is a reversal of the earth's magnetic field. The magnetic polarity at the geographic north and south poles switch. Not the crust of the planet.

IOW no earthquakes, weird weather, or anything.

Magnetic poleshifts have happend numerous times in the past, including times when humans were around. Magnetic pole shifts have nothign to do with ice. They occcur even when there is no ice at the poles. And obvously it wouldn't cause a shifting of the earths crust, slipping around like a loose skin.


the ice shelf eventually became too heavy, the ice shelf would drift out to sea, and at 26 hours be far enuff out to shift the balnce of poles

Ice can indeed affect portions of the crust, it can compress it. Over very long periods of time, and when there is a massive amount of ice added, like going from non-glacial to glacial conditions.Regardless, this isn't going to force sections of the crust to rip and rend and slide on its own. Even if we pretend that its happening on a plate, something that already has 'broken' boundaries, its not going to happen.

Not to mention that only a small mass of ice, relative to the crust and the forces involved, is added with the snowfall.

This scenario wouldn't work in 26,000 years, let alone 26 hours.


Im done so go ahead and poke holes in my claims.

Please present evidence to back up the ideas. Lack of evidence to back up the claims is the fatal 'hole' to the claims.



posted on Dec, 13 2005 @ 10:42 PM
link   
Depends on which you're talking about nygdan. If you're talking about a magnetic pole flip - which would be the correct nomenclature for a reversal of the polarity of the north and south poles - then you are correct. But if some one were talking about a "pole shift" (which it would be incorrect to use this phrase for a magnetic pole flip), then they are talking about a physical shift of the crust to where the magnetic pole now points through a different location on the crust because the crust moved. If this happened there would be mighty big earthquakes, winds, tidal waves...

and general Wrath of God type stuff.

[edit on 12-13-2005 by Valhall]



posted on Dec, 13 2005 @ 10:48 PM
link   

Originally posted by Valhall
If this happened there would be mighty big earthquakes, winds, tidal waves...

Yes, but this can't happen. I am curious to see if the idea of the crustal slip-flip originated seperately from the idea of a (magnetic) 'pole reversal', or was later confused with it. But often people say one and mean both.



posted on Dec, 13 2005 @ 11:01 PM
link   

Originally posted by Nygdan

Originally posted by Valhall
If this happened there would be mighty big earthquakes, winds, tidal waves...

Yes, but this can't happen. I am curious to see if the idea of the crustal slip-flip originated seperately from the idea of a (magnetic) 'pole reversal', or was later confused with it. But often people say one and mean both.


tsk tsk nygdan. You saying that doesn't make it impossible! For the sake of what will most assuredly be an interesting discussion....

Assuming it could...

and requiring that there be a causal force to put the shift in play, the Lt. General Chickelshnit has an interesting theory. I have read recently that models are showing that while the north pole ice cap is melting (due to global warming), the models show that there will be a near conservation of icedom (if you will) where the south pole increases at almost the same rate as the rate of loss of the north ice cap. This could cause a rather wobbly and stressful situation for our little crust.



[edit on 12-13-2005 by Valhall]



posted on Dec, 14 2005 @ 12:56 AM
link   
I'm no geologist, but I'm with Nygdan – and he covered most of it. This is all a theory - when it comes to a physical "crust slip". That's because we don't really know what's going on underneath our feet. Yes, we have a pretty good idea based on scientific calculations, formulations, etc. but no one knows anything for an absolute fact.

For the theory (that the entire crust would "slip" or move to land the polar caps (and the rest of the continents) on entirely different locations) to work, the crust needs to be "loose" on the earth's mantel. Say like a floating skin. And gravitational forces have to be brought into the theory. Now this adds a huge factor to this theory and I suggest anyone who considers this theory should take a quick look at exactly all the gravitational forces playing in and on earth on this site. Keeping that in mind we know that if the crust was able to slide on the mantle, the Rosden Ice shelf should "fall" towards something if it became to heavy. Now, the strongest gravitational force it will most probably topple towards is the sun. But it's not as simple as that. Keep in mind the moon's gravitational influence on earth, the earth's own centre of gravity and not to forget the earth's "wobble"... I'm not even going to pretend that I can do that calculation of where the continents could end up. Such a shift goes beyond human imagination and if the planet should survive such a shift I strongly doubt that any life could survive (including cockroaches). In my imagination, earth will literally be torn apart. Why? Because of all the "faults" on earth.

This is what an earthquake looks like.



This happens because of the slight movement in the earth's crust - actually plates. (Yes, I know it sounds contradictory, but hear me out.) OK, so now imagine the whole earth's crust moving all over the planet. All the "faults" would collapse, and the crust would crumble and tear the continents apart. Then the volcanic eruptions would follow along with hundreds of tsunamis. 99% of the earth’s population would die? I suggest reconsidering. Even if anyone was to survive the actual event(s) – which could last for months or even years – there would be no infrastructure, and just about nothing to eat.

But back to the crust.

It doesn't exactly work like that, however. The earth's crust can't move (or slip) as a "unit" (unless it can be proved by someone!). No, the earth consists of several "plates" that "drifts" on the mantle. This is more or less proved by the continental drift. In cross section, the Earth releases its internal heat by convecting, or boiling much like a pot of pudding on the stove. Hot asthenospheric mantle rises to the surface and spreads laterally, transporting oceans and continents as on a slow conveyor belt. The speed of this motion is a few centimetres per year, about as fast as your fingernails grow. The new lithosphere, created at the ocean spreading centres, cools as it ages and eventually becomes dense enough to sink back into the mantle. The subducted crust releases water to form volcanic island chains above, and after a few hundred million years will be heated and recycled back to the spreading centres.

This is the different tectonic plates:



Hmm… I don’t think I did the explanation of the “impossibility” of the theory any justice.

So, unless any new evidence comes up, the scientific possibility of an entire outer crust "slip" or "movement" (as a unit) is absolutely "impossible". (Never say never
). Norcan a single plate move on its own, because it's prevented from the other plates from moving.

Nope. I'm sorry. I find it highly unlikely. But then again, I'm not geologist.



posted on Dec, 14 2005 @ 02:37 AM
link   

Originally posted by Nygdan
Yes, but this can't happen.

Actually it can, and I am of the opinion that it has and does so in regular cycles. Its a simple principle of physics really, greatest mass moves to the point of greatest spin. The Antartic Ice mass grows to a maurity, and the earth shifts on its axis to accomodate the new centrifugal force. There's a thread here that discusses this in length....
www.abovetopsecret.com...
It's a theory yes, but one that would explain so much.



posted on Dec, 14 2005 @ 04:25 AM
link   
there is no Rosden ice shelf!



posted on Dec, 14 2005 @ 06:16 AM
link   

Originally posted by Mr Chiclestick
if the rosden ice shelf on the antarctic continent were to drift out into the south atlantic for 60 miles, there would be an immense polar shift along with earthquakes, tsunamis, and climate changes.

the rosden ice shelf annually recieves the most snow on the antarctic continent. this also means that one side of the continent is much heavier than the other. if the ice shelf eventually became too heavy, the ice shelf would drift out to sea, and at 26 hours be far enuff out to shift the balnce of poles and cause a massive worldwide annihalation that would wipe out 99 percent of all life on the Earth.



Im done so go ahead and poke holes in my claims.


You do realise that an ice shelf by it's very nature is floating on water. If it were to break away it would continue to displace it's weight in water and thus equilibrium would be maintained.

Besides which, an ice shelf has such a miniscule mass in comparison with the Earth it's like saying a flea landing on an aircraft carrier will cause it to sink because of the extra weight....



posted on Dec, 14 2005 @ 08:16 AM
link   

Originally posted by twitchy
Actually it can, and I am of the opinion that it has and does so in regular cycles.

What happens to ridges in this system? Why don't we see an 'extinct' ridge on the opposite side of the Mid Atlantic Ridge?



The Antartic Ice mass grows to a maurity, and the earth shifts on its axis to accomodate the new centrifugal force.

The mass invovled is extremely small compared to the forces involved.


It's a theory yes, but one that would explain so much.

It doesn't explain the evidence better than the prevailing theories tho, and it seems to have so fatal flaws, like the idea that the crust has a line of attachment, can dettach, as a whole, and move, as a whole. Even if it could dettach in a meaningful way I suspect that any forces invovled would simply rip and rend a portion of it, rather than move the whole thing smoothly (more or less smoothly anyway).



posted on Dec, 14 2005 @ 08:28 AM
link   
No, there won't be a physical crust shift... and the idea that the ice shelf will cause any huge changes is, as Nygdan put it, untrue.

Remember the Ice Age? In fact, there've been quite a few of them as well as times when the Earth was so warm that there was little or no polar ice.

There were no massive crustal collapses then or rapid changes in continent position or incredible disasters that wiped out all life on Earth.

The fact is that the planet has gone through this exact scenario at least twenty times in the past. Because our planet is made of rock and not methane ice, the heating/cooling cycles did not cause repositioning or other "effects" that have been claimed by those who didn't understand the concept of "magnetic pole shift."

There've also been magnetic pole shifts in the past and the Earth has been disaster-free in their wake.

An increase in the number of earthquakes is likely, as is an increase in the number and intensity of hurricanes (both occur when the global climate warms significantly.)

And Chicklestick, lay off the "Lt General" claim. We're tired of it already.



posted on Dec, 14 2005 @ 12:08 PM
link   
You theory is easily debunkable.

Consider the following:

If a section of ice were to calve off of the Ross (not rossden) ice shelf (like they do with regular frequency), that section of ice would have to float in the ocean in order for it to move away from the Antarctic continent.

It is not really likely that any portions of the ice shelf are in fact cantilevered over the ocean (not currently being supported by the ocean), Therefore all section of the ice shelf that are susceptible to braking away are currently floating in the ocean.

The mass of the ice from the breakaway potion of the ice shelf moves away from the Antarctic coast, sea water of an equal mass will simply flow in behind it.

As a result, the net distribution of mass on the surface of the earth will not change.


edit: damn, I see that Essan beat me to it.





[edit on 14-12-2005 by HowardRoark]



posted on Dec, 14 2005 @ 12:51 PM
link   
I don't think it's too far off.
As the weight distribution on the earth's crust changes due to polar ice melting, a new equilibrium will be reached - the BIG question is, which lucky continents will become the new poles!



posted on Dec, 14 2005 @ 01:15 PM
link   

Originally posted by AtlantisAgain
I don't think it's too far off.
As the weight distribution on the earth's crust changes due to polar ice melting


Read my post above. How would this happen? What mass are you talking about? the weight of the ocean? It's a liquid. Ice bergs? they are floating in the liquid, displacing a mass of water equal to their weight.



BTW, how deep is the ocean compared to the diameter of the Earth?



posted on Dec, 14 2005 @ 01:19 PM
link   
It was mentioned just last night on TV, ( I think CNN but can't be sure), that over the last one hundred years, the magnetic North Pole had moved from Canada out into the Arctic Ocean and was headed toward Siberia. map

They further mentioned that the magnetic pole's location determines who gets to see the 'northern lights'.....and that if it continues toward Siberia, Alaskans will lose sight of the lights.

Whether this would be called 'shift' or not.....it is movement, and looks like what would eventually lead to the polar 'flip', or swapping of north for south......from what I've read, this flip will not actually occur all at once. ( It still sounds ominous)

Could this magnetic pole movement be what Cayce predicted??



posted on Dec, 14 2005 @ 01:33 PM
link   
From what i understood the magnetic pole and the earths axis are 2 different things, and the pole moving will not affect the axis or the earths rotation.



posted on Dec, 14 2005 @ 02:00 PM
link   

Originally posted by zoso28
From what i understood the magnetic pole and the earths axis are 2 different things, and the pole moving will not affect the axis or the earths rotation.



Correct, but if you read the initial post in this thread,

the rosden ice shelf annually recieves the most snow on the antarctic continent. this also means that one side of the continent is much heavier than the other. if the ice shelf eventually became too heavy, the ice shelf would drift out to sea, and at 26 hours be far enuff out to shift the balnce of poles and cause a massive worldwide annihalation that would wipe out 99 percent of all life on the Earth.


Mr Chicklestick, is clearly implying that the axis of rotation will change.



new topics

top topics



 
1
<<   2  3 >>

log in

join