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Europe wants more Robot Money

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posted on Dec, 13 2005 @ 06:10 PM
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You would think $100 million would be be plenty, but a according to European researches involved in Robotics it not. They claim Increased funding is "essential" if Europe is to compete with projects in the United States, Japan and South Korea.




Increased funding is essential, they said, if Europe is to exploit robotics' vast economic potential and compete with projects in the United States, Japan, and South Korea.

Each year, the commission and EU nations combined spend $100 million on robotics research. Japan and Korea each spend about the same, while the United States spends up to $500 million — largely because of the huge demand for military-related robotics, researchers and EU officials say.



I have to say I was shocked to hear the US spends that much compared to Japan and S. Korea which seem to be cutting edge in Robotics for the entire World. But when they mention its due to military robotics research it makes sense.

Is Europe in danger of missing out on the vast economic potential of Robotics? Japan and S. Korea IMHO seems to be convinced money invested in Robotic research is going to be a wise investment in the future. They seem to invision a future where robotics play a vital role.

One extra part of this article I found interesting.


In contrast, several robotics experts said, Japanese projects tend to be showier in hopes of making a media impact and attracting funding.

Hmm.. a interesting view one I dont know if I share. I sort of think this is the talk of researchers that are a tad jealous of Japan's amazing robots and thier culture that is really behind robotics research. If they had the backing and money to make "showier" robots like ASIMO I bet they would too.

[url=http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20051204/ap_on_sc/european_robotics;_ylt=AmCe00NQhBMGd0qE164Ki6UjtBAF;_ylu=X3o'___'A5aHJvMDdwBHNlYwN5bmNhdA--]link[/ur l]




posted on Dec, 14 2005 @ 03:54 PM
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ASIMO Gets a real job



Honda Motor's new
humanoid robot Asimo,
which can run at a speed
of 6kph and also in a
circular pattern, walks
with a Honda employee
at the company's headquarters
in Tokyo 13 December 2005.
The 1.3m tall, 54kg ASIMO
achieves the ability to act
in sync with people and
will debut as an office
aid to carry drink service
for guests. AFP photo
by Yoshikazu Tsuno.



posted on Dec, 14 2005 @ 04:20 PM
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I think I have identified the problem:


The Cyberhand team and other European robotics research groups have been more apprehensive than the Japanese about bringing robotic technology into everyday life


Exactly. Japanese companies who invest in robotics seem to have a very direct motivation towards bringing their projects into the market place. This creates good media publicity for their work, allows extra funds, and makes it look like they are tops in the world at doing what they are doing. Which is making market place robotics, and they are tops.


$100 million might not be enough if the companies recieving the money are apprehensive towards displaying and selling their products.

The US however, for the most part, can afford to disregard this tactic mainly because, as stated in the article, money for robotics is coming from the government. I think it be hard to sell a Mars rover, or a robot designed to penetrate areas of high nuclear radiation, or etc.

The lesson here for the Euros should be an economic lesson: sell your product, increase funding. Honestly, there cannot be too many companies who want to invest in these products if there is no redeeming social value.



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