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The Isis and Onomastics

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posted on Dec, 10 2005 @ 03:07 AM
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I grew up in a town that is in a shire named the Isis. Obviously this is in reference to the Egyptian Mother/Fertility Goddess. I grew up being fascinated as to how a small, rural area in Australia could gain such an exotic name.

I asked many of the older generation in town what they knew of the name and how the shire came to be named that way. I was informed by one elderly gentleman(a local publican, a Freemason and a top bloke) that the area was named by prominant settlers to the area who were Freemasons and that the name was significant to Freemasons.

I became interested in Onomastics and toponomy.

I then discovered that this peculiar study is covered in Freemasonry.


"It is certain that onomatology, or the science of names, forms a very interesting part of the investigations of the higher Masonry, and it is only in this way that any connection can be created between the two sciences." - Encyclopedia of Freemasonry


It was interesting to discover that the Scottish Rite Temple in Georgia U.S.A. sits at N 33 Degrees 30.267 W 082 Degrees 00.933. As the highest degree of the Scottish Rite is 33, is this more than a coincidence?

I don't want any Masons to reveal any of their secrets but I am interested in how much Freemasonry has played a part in the naming and positioning of cities, towns, districts etc...

I'd also like to hear from anyone who knows of a Masonic influence in their area.

I find this of interest because of the geodetic positioning of many of the ancient structures that cover the globe. Is Masonry continuing a long tradition of geomantria?

That old publican never did tell me why the shire was named Isis, but I assumed because it was seen by these men who named it as a bountiful area for farm production.

These days there is a furore in the town over the local council reintroducing the Egyptian Goddess to the Isis logo.








[edit on 10-12-2005 by Beelzebubba]




posted on Dec, 10 2005 @ 03:15 AM
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hey there

I'm in Australia and I've never heard of a town or shire called Isis .

Can you tell me where it is?



posted on Dec, 10 2005 @ 03:18 AM
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Sure, it's a town called Childers (infamous for the tragic Backpacker hostel fire) in Queensland, the shire is the Isis. It's not far from Bundaberg (Rum).



posted on Dec, 15 2005 @ 12:57 AM
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So what, have I stumbled onto something that Mason's can't talk about or is it so crazy it's not worth discussing?



posted on Dec, 15 2005 @ 08:40 AM
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Originally posted by Beelzebubba
Sure, it's a town called Childers (infamous for the tragic Backpacker hostel fire) in Queensland, the shire is the Isis. It's not far from Bundaberg (Rum).

Just a note, not trying to be snarky. Why no interest in these other cracked out names? Isis is a big goddess. Masonry is, in one sense, a group that studies comparative religion. Also, as more of a stretch, lots of people say that masonry is a continuation of hte old Mystery Religions, and the mystery religion of Isis in the roman world was very very popular.

Also, publican? Is that a common usage in aussie-land? What sort of official is a publican? Amoung the romans, a publicani was someone who purchased the right to collect government taxes.



posted on Dec, 15 2005 @ 09:58 AM
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Originally posted by Nygdan

Originally posted by Beelzebubba
Sure, it's a town called Childers (infamous for the tragic Backpacker hostel fire) in Queensland, the shire is the Isis. It's not far from Bundaberg (Rum).

Just a note, not trying to be snarky. Why no interest in these other cracked out names? Isis is a big goddess. Masonry is, in one sense, a group that studies comparative religion. Also, as more of a stretch, lots of people say that masonry is a continuation of hte old Mystery Religions, and the mystery religion of Isis in the roman world was very very popular.

Also, publican? Is that a common usage in aussie-land? What sort of official is a publican? Amoung the romans, a publicani was someone who purchased the right to collect government taxes.



A Publican is the proprietor of a Pub, a Pub is a wateringhole/Booza AKA bar.


I live near the Isis shire i never heard any complaints about the Childers logo causing gossip, but i guess i didnt even hear they where changing it p.



posted on Dec, 15 2005 @ 04:03 PM
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My question has not so much to do with where I come from, as to the use of onomotology and toponomy all over the world. The U.S.A. in particular. As the Scottish Rite is believed to be amoung the more esoteric of Masonic groups, and it is predominately American, I thought the U.S. would probably be the most interesting starting point. Another site that is on the 33 degree latitude is the Trinity Site in New Mexico(Lat: 33 degrees 37' 30" N, Long: 33 degrees 45' 00"). Are these just coincidences? Perhaps when you start looking for something it starts taking on a special significance to you. Like William Burroughs and 23.

I just found Isis particularly interesting because not many Australian places have Egyptian names.

The only reason I ask Freemasons about this is because it surprised me to learn that onomastics is studied by them.

I have also heard that the reason that the floor of the lodge is tessellated is to represent the earth, the earth as a chessboard.

[edit on 15-12-2005 by Beelzebubba]



posted on Dec, 16 2005 @ 01:48 AM
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Originally posted by Beelzebubba
So what, have I stumbled onto something that Mason's can't talk about or is it so crazy it's not worth discussing?


I wouldn't say it was crazy at all, but there's nothing masonic about Isis.

However I would thank you for allowing me to make a daily advancement in knowledge. I'd never heard of onomastics before.


Onomastics (Onomatology) is the study of proper names of all kinds and the origins of names. The word is derived from the Greek word ὄνομα (onoma), meaning name. Toponymy or toponomastics, the study of place names, is one of the principal branches of onomastics. Anthroponomastics is the study of personal names.


What a cool subject. Personally I'm quite interested in linguistics and the study of the history of language (does that have a name too?) so perhaps I have studied it before without realising it.

However, rest assured, its got nothing to do with freemasonry, which focuses on self-improvement through following divine precepts.



posted on Dec, 16 2005 @ 06:13 AM
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Originally posted by Nygdan
Also, publican? Is that a common usage in aussie-land? What sort of official is a publican? Amoung the romans, a publicani was someone who purchased the right to collect government taxes.


As stated by NumberCruncher, the publican is probably the most important official in any country town (or city for that matter). He controls the flow of amber fluid. Far more important than a mayor or tax collector.


Trinityman, your study of linguistics would definately have led into the field of onomatology. Toponomy is a very interesting field especially when studying the lat. and long. of certain places. With a username like yours you may also find it interesting that the Trinity River in Texas also runs through the 33 degree latitude. Now the only planning there was made by nature herself.



[edit on 16-12-2005 by Beelzebubba]



posted on Dec, 16 2005 @ 06:36 AM
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I know 5/8th of fark all on this subject, but saying that im finding this interesting, is there a way i can see what lines my house sits on( i have the land survey papers somewhere) and cross referance if that means anything/nothing/good/bad in toponomy?




posted on Dec, 16 2005 @ 06:40 AM
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Originally posted by Beelzebubba
Now the only planning there was made by nature herself.


Not quite. Gerardus Mercator devised the cartographic system that numbered and located the parallels, and presumably some settler or other named the Trinity River because it rises in three principal branches: the East Fork, the Elm Fork, and the West Fork.

Incidentally, I have heard several explanations of the reason for the chequered carpet in masonic lodges. The most commonly accepted down my way is that the white squares represent light (good) and the black squares darkness (evil); and that as imperfect humans our movement across the carpet symbolizes mans constant movement between and through these two fundamental axes.



posted on Dec, 16 2005 @ 07:01 AM
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Originally posted by Trinityman


Not quite. Gerardus Mercator devised the cartographic system that numbered and located the parallels, and presumably some settler or other named the Trinity River because it rises in three principal branches: the East Fork, the Elm Fork, and the West Fork.


Wow, that is even more intriguing. Do you think planning or accident happens to find two trinity sites on the 33?


Incidentally, I have heard several explanations of the reason for the chequered carpet in masonic lodges. The most commonly accepted down my way is that the white squares represent light (good) and the black squares darkness (evil); and that as imperfect humans our movement across the carpet symbolizes mans constant movement between and through these two fundamental axes.


Thankyou for your explanation of the tessallation. I like the thought of balance in our lives, you can't have shadows without light. Have you ever heard of the game-board belief?

NumberCruncher, you could check out your survey papers. Tell us what the lat. and long. is and the name of the closest town or the shire it is in.

You live close to the Isis, it's been many years since I've been there. The stink kicked up about the Egyptain Symbolism was started by the local Uniting Church. Probably the most excitement Childers has seen in a while.


[edit on 16-12-2005 by Beelzebubba]



posted on Dec, 21 2005 @ 06:26 PM
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Mercator is an interesting individual. I had not read anything about his life prior to Trinityman's mention of him. The name is known but I had taken no interest in the man himself. Interesting to find that he was befriended by John Dee, and the two worked together closely for three years. Rarely being apart in that time.
Dee was much more than a mathematician. Having set up the framework for Britain's intelligence network. Having the code-name 007, I guess Dee could be described as the original James Bond. A practicing occultist, deeply into the Kabbalah, Dee has been nominated by some as the founder of modern Freemasonry.
The Zohar says that "everything lies veiled in numbers".

The naming of the Trinity River is attributed to Alonso De Leonqv in 1690 (La Santisima Trinidad).

The river itself, however, lent itself to the name because of the three forks. It is this synchronicity that I find amazing.

The Marquis de Lafayette is a mysterious individual that figures heavily into the Masonic history of America. His name alone is fascinating to a student of onomastics.









[edit on 21-12-2005 by Beelzebubba]



posted on Dec, 21 2005 @ 08:37 PM
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Another point about the Trinity site in New Mexico, is that it lies at the end of the 'Jornada del Muerto' (Journey of the Dead Man). Appropriate, no?

The 'Land of Enchantment' is so rich for toponomastic studies.

[edit on 21-12-2005 by Beelzebubba]



posted on Dec, 21 2005 @ 09:25 PM
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Originally posted by Beelzebubba
it interesting that the Trinity River in Texas also runs through the 33 degree latitude. Now the only planning there was made by nature herself.

Damned Grande Architect of the Universe. *shakes fist*

Trinity, how about philology? Tho perhaps that is more the study of words as words, not necessarily the history of languages (assuming linguistics doesn't just cover it)



posted on Dec, 21 2005 @ 11:31 PM
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Philology was superceded by linguistics.



posted on Apr, 6 2006 @ 11:58 PM
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I have a query for Trinityman or any other Mason's who may be able to assist. Does the star Sirius hold the same importance to Freemason's outside the Scottish Rite? If so, wouldn't the fact that Sirius is associated with the Goddess Isis mean she does have some relevance within Freemasonry?

Sirius: the Star of Isis


Tito - Surprise, wonder and grief took possession of my mind at the time.
Solomon - Why were you thus affected?
Tito - I was thus affected at the sight of what I saw in the blazing star.
Solomon - Pray, what could that be?
Tito - The ineffable name of the Grand Architect of the Universe... Jachinai, which I saw in the middle of the blazing star.

- Intendant of the Building (8th degree) Scottish Rite



"The blazing star of five points... represented Sirius..." - Albert Pike Morals and Dogma



posted on Apr, 7 2006 @ 12:51 AM
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To my knowledge, it doesn't feature in Blue Lodge...

BUT

This might be the point at which one of the more experienced brothers comes on and embarrasses me with contrary information, haha.



posted on Apr, 7 2006 @ 03:06 AM
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this is probably the most exciting topic ive seen in this forum

there are a lot of coincidences of locations of buildings, dates, names, etc which all stem from Freemasonry or are related to it.

this isnt a topic which many people know about. i think this information has been lost throughout the ages, and was probably used way more when we counted on the stars to travel. it personally intrigues me for a number of reasons.

the stars you mention Do have significance. the Pleadies (sp) constellation, the polar star Sirius, and more. It's worth reading about. Tons of connections.

i find it fascinating to look at the position of the heavens and find parallels throughout history. for example, in freemasonry, why a certain buildings location and how it was dedicated on a certain date and time. coincidentally(?) the time and date had a special astrological meaning. like, as an example, the stars were in the same inverted position over the pyramids of giza 1000 years ago to the second. or the stars were in a certain alignment.

this masonic astrological information isnt surprising. scholars have always studied the heavens, so why wouldnt they do things on dates which special cellestial events occured?

the heavens are living numbers. they change every second and sometimes the same #s arent seen for millions of years. quite fascinating.


THIS is probably the best source of information on what i'm talking about. But beware, take it with a grain of salt. I hope this peaks some other peoples interests.





posted on Apr, 7 2006 @ 07:32 AM
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Originally posted by Beelzebubba
I have a query for Trinityman or any other Mason's who may be able to assist. Does the star Sirius hold the same importance to Freemason's outside the Scottish Rite?


It would depend upon the individual Mason, what he himself believed. The Blazing Star is a symbol found within the Blue Lodges. It was Pike's contention that this symbol represented Sirius, due mostly to the fact that the ancients realized that when the earth was closest to Sirius was the middle of summer, and at that time Nature seethed with life and abundance. Pike's idea is possible, I suppose, but seems far-fetched to me. In my opinion, the Blazing Star represents the sun in our own solar system.



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