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New Study May Bring About Quantum Networks.

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posted on Dec, 7 2005 @ 05:27 PM
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Scientists from Georgia Institute of Technology and Harvard have transmitted a photon between atomic clouds, stored it, and then retrieved it intact.
This accomplishment has the potential to store and process information using atoms and photons.



www.sciencedaily.com

Georgia Institute of Technology and Harvard scientists say they've transmitted a photon between atomic clouds, stored it, and then retrieved it intact.

The accomplishment reportedly marks a significant step towards realizing a quantum communication or computation network, which would store and process information using atoms and photons.

Classical light pulses are already used to carry information through optical fibers. But such signals must be periodically boosted using a "repeater," which would destroy any quantum information carried by individual photons of light.

But Alex Kuzmich and colleagues at the Georgia Institute of Technology and Matthew Eisaman and colleagues at Harvard University report effectively creating a basis for a "quantum repeater," potentially allowing quantum information to be carried over long distances without significant degradation.

Scientists say the finding is potentially highly significant for the field of quantum cryptography, since such a technique could be utilized in distributing code keys used by a recipient to unlock a secure message.

The studies are detailed in two papers published in the current issue of the journal Nature.


Please visit the link provided for the complete story.




posted on Dec, 8 2005 @ 02:08 PM
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I am not sure why they are doing this this way though. If they want to handle information on the quantum level, they might start thinking of using entanglement instead. If I understand correctly, if you have particle A and particle B, you can have them be identical if they are entangled with an intermediary particle C. The end result is that changes made to one particle are realized by the other particle at great distances and instantly. Therefore, networks are made obsolete in that scenario. You want to send a message from one side of the univers to the other instantly? Use entanglement, then devise a system that identifies particle states with the "on" and "off" position, and fashion a device around it. Theoretically this would make cell phone reception a thing of the past (although it would be reallin inconvenient to have to entangle your particles with someone else's particles before your phone can talk to them). Oh and BTW, since there is no known way to intercept quantum communication, that method is incredibly secure. Well at least that's how it's supposed to work in MY world, please correct me if I am mistaken.

-P


Originally posted by Umbrax
Scientists from Georgia Institute of Technology and Harvard have transmitted a photon between atomic clouds, stored it, and then retrieved it intact.
This accomplishment has the potential to store and process information using atoms and photons.



www.sciencedaily.com

Georgia Institute of Technology and Harvard scientists say they've transmitted a photon between atomic clouds, stored it, and then retrieved it intact.

The accomplishment reportedly marks a significant step towards realizing a quantum communication or computation network, which would store and process information using atoms and photons.

Classical light pulses are already used to carry information through optical fibers. But such signals must be periodically boosted using a "repeater," which would destroy any quantum information carried by individual photons of light.

But Alex Kuzmich and colleagues at the Georgia Institute of Technology and Matthew Eisaman and colleagues at Harvard University report effectively creating a basis for a "quantum repeater," potentially allowing quantum information to be carried over long distances without significant degradation.

Scientists say the finding is potentially highly significant for the field of quantum cryptography, since such a technique could be utilized in distributing code keys used by a recipient to unlock a secure message.

The studies are detailed in two papers published in the current issue of the journal Nature.


Please visit the link provided for the complete story.





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