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A question about planet X

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posted on Dec, 6 2005 @ 11:53 PM
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If and this is a strong "if" there were a Planet X orbiting our sun every 3,600 years, How dose it remain in orbit? I'll admit I know very little about planetary science (just became intersested in the subject), but it seems to me any planet sized object with that distant an orbit would just fly off into space.

I hope this isn't a stupid question.




posted on Dec, 7 2005 @ 09:19 AM
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Originally posted by neversubmit
If and this is a strong "if" there were a Planet X orbiting our sun every 3,600 years, How dose it remain in orbit? I'll admit I know very little about planetary science (just became intersested in the subject), but it seems to me any planet sized object with that distant an orbit would just fly off into space.

I hope this isn't a stupid question.


There isn't such a planet, and you're right -- I don't think the gravitational forces would keep it in orbit at that distance. As far as I'm aware, the 10th planet (unofficially named "Xena" with a small moon named "Gabrielle") is the most distant planetoid found... and it's got an orbital period of 557 years or so.
en.wikipedia.org...

As far as I know, even the comets (which are the farthest-ranging bodies) don't go that distance from the solar system.



posted on Dec, 7 2005 @ 01:07 PM
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Originally posted by Byrd
As far as I know, even the comets (which are the farthest-ranging bodies) don't go that distance from the solar system.


Some of the long period comets have orbits upwards of a thousand years, but they have to just about kiss the Sun in order to go around. I don't think a planet would be able to maintain that sort of an orbit, it would just be too massive.

There are comets that do have open orbits though, meaning they don't come back to the Sun and escape our Solar System.



posted on Dec, 7 2005 @ 01:48 PM
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Originally posted by neversubmit
If and this is a strong "if" there were a Planet X orbiting our sun every 3,600 years, How dose it remain in orbit? I'll admit I know very little about planetary science (just became intersested in the subject), but it seems to me any planet sized object with that distant an orbit would just fly off into space.

I hope this isn't a stupid question.


I believe that "they" believe X (that is, i guess, if you mean Nibiru) orbits between our sun and its, hypothetical, companion Nemesis.


Hypothetical Planets: Nemesis, the Sun's companion star

Suppose our Sun was not alone but had a companion star. Suppose that this companion star moved in an elliptical orbit, its solar distance varying between 90,000 a.u. (1.4 light years) and 20,000 a.u., with a period of 30 million years. Also suppose this star is dark or at least very faint, and because of that we haven't noticed it yet.


The Sun and Nemesis are "throwing" it back and forth i guess. *shrug*

This page has a theory that explains the orbit this way:

www.poleshiftprepare.com...

Planet Xis caught in a perpetual sling orbit between our Sun and a twin dead Sun we cannot see or detect from a radiation signature. It spends most of its orbital period in a dither between the two Suns. The slight drifting momentum toward either Sun causes Planet X to gradually get caught in the gravitational net of the Sun it is moving towards, and within a few years, rapidly increases speed at an exponential rate as it draws nearer to the Sun. Planet X does not plummet into the Sun (or collide with Earth for that matter) because its large mass invokes an increasing repulsion force when it comes closer to it. Thus, it eventually veers away from the Sun at a computable angle, seeking the path of least resistance through the inner solar system.


I'm no physicist so i can't verify the veracity of that theory. I guess it's theoretically possible to have a large planet on such a "long" orbit without violating the laws of physics, specifically Newton's. But with all the satellites, probes and what-not that we send into the solar system (which require precise calculations that would be severly effected by a "hidden/unknown" companion star) i have a hard time believing we get them to go where we send them without taking the gravitational effects of this "companion star" into account, know what i mean?


If you wanna really go out there, here a link to the Flagship Nibiru Page

www.nibiruancouncil.com...

Nibiru is the 4th dimensional flagship of the Milky Way Galaxy’s Galactic Federation. Like Pelegai, many different civilizations have representatives that live aboard it. As well as being a Federation Flagship, Nibiru is also a planet and a battle star. Nibiru is a little over three times the size of earth.

Nibiru was originally a planet that was thrown out of orbit with the implosion/explosion of Sirius B. It wound up in the Pleiades and therefore is known to some as a Pleiadian planet.

Nibiru became a starship when it was converted from a near lifeless form, hollowed out and turned into a ship. You could liken it in some ways to the space station on the TV show called Deep Space Nine. The only difference is that Nibiru travels the galaxy. That is why the people live inside of it instead of on the surface. Another reason is that it was created for deep space travel where there would be no sun for many years. In a way, you could say that it is an artificial planet. Only the shell is original.
(emphasis Rren...good stuff)


Alot of hard science on that site, what respectable scholar could possibly deny those facts.



posted on Dec, 7 2005 @ 04:03 PM
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Thanks for the responces. I always found this one point to be a fly in the ointment as far as the planet x theory goes.



posted on Dec, 8 2005 @ 01:23 PM
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Thanks for the responces. I always found this one point to be a fly in the ointment as far as the planet x theory goes.


No sweat.


I don't know a whole lot about this stuff but i have done some background reading online. When most people talk about Nibiru their usually referencing Zecharia Sitchin's theories. Sitchin actually got his degree in economic history but grew up in Palestine where he gained his"profound knowledge of modern and ancient Hebrew, other Semitic and European languages, the Old Testament, and the history and archeology of the Near East." [source] (so "they" say). The big controvercy with Sitchin is in his, alledged, ability to read and properly translate the Sumerian Cuneiform script, where all other scholars have failed....."to do so properly" that is.

There's quite a few threads on ATS that discuss Sitchin and you'll see just about all the people who have some sort of educational background in archaeolgy, linguistics etc... think the guy is full of it. This site sums up, i think, the general opinion of Sitchin from his "peers": Zecharia Sitchin's Errors: An Overview. He's not exactly beloved or respected by the academic community, to say the least. I mean when they actually go through the trouble of making a "sitchiniswrong.com" site for ya...it's not looking too good for your theory. But i advocate Intelligent Design Theory, so i know that feeling.


....But i digress...

I was thinking about Nibiru this morning, and well, isn't about time to able to prove or debunk this definatively. Nibiru is supposed to be, depending on who ya ask, about four times larger than the earth. On a predictable, 3600 year, orbit. It's due back by 2012 etc., .....so my question is:

With all the information we have from the various Nibiru "theorists" can't we reasonably guesstimate how fast it's traveling? ("we" being someone smarter than me who can actually solve that mathematically
)

IOW if this massive planet is hurdling towards us at high speed(10's of thousands of mph?) with an eta of



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