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Ancient Naacal Language

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posted on Dec, 2 2005 @ 02:34 AM
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Any available texts on this? Or do I have to befriend a Himalayan mystic in order to learn it...if those stone tablets do even exist.

THERE'S SOMETHING MISSING FROM OUR HISTORY




posted on Dec, 3 2005 @ 04:47 PM
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By any chance could you post a couple of links to give us an idea of what you're getting at? I'm afraid I don't know what tablets we're talking about here.

As for learning a language though- if you can determine online that A. It actually is understood and B. Where it's from, all you should have to do is do a little looking around and emailing to colleges until you find out who offers a class. I'm sure some languages are a lot harder than others to find of course- for some odd reason (probably something to do with demographics) we've got Spanish classes at my school, but not Portugese or Basque, but give it a look.



posted on Dec, 3 2005 @ 05:09 PM
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Perhaps Sacreligion is refering to James Churchward's series of books, the first of which is titled:
Lost Continent of Mu.



Col. James Churchward (1852-1936) was a British occult writer. In 1926 he published The Lost Continent of Mu, which claimed to prove the existence of a lost continent, called Mu, in the Pacific Ocean.

According to Churchward, Mu "extended from somewhere north of Hawaii to the south as far as the Fijis and Easter Island." Its civilization, which flourished 50,000 years before Churchward's day, was technologically more advanced than the ancient civilizations of India, Babylon, Persia, Egypt and the Mayas.

Churchward claimed to have gained his knowledge of this lost land after befriending an Indian priest, who taught him to read an ancient dead language. The priest disclosed the existence of several ancient tablets, written by the Naacals, and Churchward gained access to these records after overcoming the priest's initial reluctance.



posted on Dec, 3 2005 @ 05:43 PM
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"In the early 1900's Wiliam Niven a Scot geologist found evidence of cataclysmic tidal waves that had overwelmed the Valley of Mexico on several occasions... Beneath the 9,500 year old layer Niven found thousands of stone houses filled with ashes and debril but cemented together with a matierial harder thant the stone itself. He also discovered hundreds of terra-cotta figures... tousands of carved stones that revealed pictographs that have never been fully deciphered.
...By established standards of the early twentieth century they were declared out of context and impossible. What made it worse for Niven was the fact that he sent reports of his findings to James Churchward, who incorporated Niven's discoveries into his theory of the lost Continent of Mu. Churchward claimed that the stone figure and tablets that Niven showed him were identical to the Nacaal Tablets he had found in a monastery in Tibet."
From : Atlantis in America, by Ivar Zapp and George Erikson. (pages 248-249)

You could also try Mexico???



posted on Dec, 3 2005 @ 06:43 PM
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I had not heard of William Niven. Maybe he influenced the story of Mu, I dunno.

According to Wiki, Agustus Le Plongeon was the first documented to have traveled to the Myan ruins in Peru, & claimed to have translated Myan tablets which told the story of a continent of Mu.

Later 1926 James Churchward published his book, Lost continent of Mu.




en.wikipedia.org...

The idea of Mu first appeared in the works of the antiquarian Augustus Le Plongeon (1825–1908), a 19th century traveler and writer who conducted his own investigations of the Maya ruins in Yucatán. He announced that he had translated the ancient Mayan writings, which supposedly showed that the Maya of Yucatán were older than the later civilizations of Atlantis and Egypt, and additionally told the story of an even older continent of Mu, which had foundered in a similar fashion to Atlantis, with the survivors founding the Maya civilization. (Later students of the Ancient Maya writings have found that Le Plongeon's "translations" were based on little more than his vivid imagination.)

This lost continent was later popularised by James Churchward (1852–1936) in a series of books, beginning with Lost Continent of Mu (1931, not 1926). The books still have devotees, but they are not considered serious archaeology, and nowadays are found in bookshops classed under 'New Age' or 'Religion and Spirituality'.


Also Ref: Augustus Le Plongeon





Intresting, I found out a little about William Niven



He recovered the first in a series of unusual stone tablets bearing pictographs from his digs at San Miguel Amantla, Azcapotzalco, and elsewhere in the Valley of Mexico in 1921. This discovery eventually totaled more than 2,600 tablets and acquired notoriety through the occultist writings of James Churchward, beginning with The Lost Continent of Mu, first published in 1926.


[edit on 12/3/05 by makeitso]



posted on Dec, 4 2005 @ 10:29 AM
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Originally posted by makeitso
I had not heard of William Niven. Maybe he influenced the story of Mu, I dunno.

According to Wiki, Agustus Le Plongeon was the first documented to have traveled to the Myan ruins in Peru, & claimed to have translated Myan tablets which told the story of a continent of Mu.

Yes, he made it up. He did find the tablets at San Miguel Amantla and so forth, but was not much of an archaeologist. You can see the tablets today in museums and collections (and they've been photographed and drawn.)

Sensationalism... "yellow journalism" was all the style in that day, and the Atlantis myth was enjoying a resurgance, along with a fairly ... uh... well, "made up" version of Egyptian history. This was not helped by fairly inept (but professional) scholars such as Wallace Budge, who did a VERY poor job on translating hieroglyphics and started re-working the signs to fit his own concept of a "new age" religion.

But their fantasies were popular... everyone loves the stories of Atlantis and ancient Egypt and preferred the fantasies to the truth. Some mystics "channeled" more "truths" about these locations and a whole business of the mythology grew up around the concept.

Plato is probably rolling in his grave.



posted on Dec, 5 2005 @ 10:52 AM
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makeitso had it right with the james churchward stuff

granted he could've just been making stuff up to help his novels sell and what not, he was classified as one of those nut archaeologists who would make sensationalist claims with no legitimate proof

the underwtaer temple at okinawa really captured my imagination, and then i heard about this story, and i wholeheartedly believe that any knowledge of the ancient world would be handed down by arcane priests or something to that nature

but yea, virtually no way of finding that out unless i go to the himalayas



posted on Jul, 26 2008 @ 07:45 PM
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reply to post by Sacreligion
 


even if you go to the himalayas is very difficult the task because first of all you must look in every monastery in northern India and in Tibet for the naacal tablets telling the story of mu. But somebody must try.



posted on Jul, 27 2008 @ 12:03 PM
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One can hunt for the snark while you're up there too. Its lovely country. I've been to India and Nepal five times over the years. Magical.



posted on Dec, 13 2008 @ 09:06 PM
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People are quick to discount the Churchward stories.

People found the Pyramids thousands of years ago but no one found the Bath's around back till 2008?

There are pyramids in Australia, egypt, China, Serbia, South America, etc; but no one thinks maybe there was a global population before the deluge?

Every culture tells of a deluge around 3500 B.C. that rose the global water levels 100 meters (almost 400 feet) but no one thinks that most coastal diving stops at ~200 feet.

there are ruins at Lake Titicaca but you can't see past 90 feet because of the sentiment...

the worst thing is that the mob will attack new theory...when the old theory has never moved past theory to proven.



posted on Dec, 14 2008 @ 07:12 AM
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People are quick to discount the Churchward stories.


Hans: For many many many good reason, can you list the three top, verified facts that support Churchwards stories?




People found the Pyramids thousands of years ago but no one found the Bath's around back till 2008?


Hans: Yep and if someone can find real evidence to support Churchward's stories then they too may be given credence.



There are pyramids in Australia, egypt, China, Serbia, South America, etc; but no one thinks maybe there was a global population before the deluge?


Hans: Correction, pyramids in Egypt, China, SA and MesoAmerican none in Serbia or Australia. (AFAIK)



Every culture tells of a deluge around 3500 B.C. that rose the global water levels 100 meters (almost 400 feet) but no one thinks that most coastal diving stops at ~200 feet.


Hans: Not exactly, they talk about various floods and incidents but they are dated to different times and places, they never covered the entire planet. The rise of waters AFAIK took place slowly.



there are ruins at Lake Titicaca but you can't see past 90 feet because of the sentiment...


Hans: Not sure what your point is?



the worst thing is that the mob will attack new theory...when the old theory has never moved past theory to proven.


Hans: All theory remains unproven - unless you are dealing with math. The theory stands on the evidence until better evidence is provided - then the theory changes, the 'mob' is suppose to question, its the methodology. If not we go back to the world of everything is possible and we live in the fear of demons and spirits.



posted on Jan, 18 2009 @ 07:19 PM
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Some tribes of Indians in the Amazon say about some lost cities hidden in the jungle with pyramids. If I remember correctly they call it Manoa.

Also it seems that there are inscriptions on some Mexican temples that point to cities that could well be in the Amazon region. But every expedition that went after these lost cities either never returned alive or return empty handed.

Even tho I agree with Hanslune on the lack of evidences to sustain Churchward theories I do think that they make a whole lot of sense and can be used to develop new ones since not everything he said is completely debunked yet.



posted on Jan, 18 2009 @ 07:33 PM
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reply to post by thomas_
 


Howdy Thomas

Er, what part of JC do you think is still valid and what sorta of theory would you make from these?



posted on Jan, 18 2009 @ 07:54 PM
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I think he has done a pretty decent work in connecting the dots between most of the "base" religions we have. Part of his work explain why we have so many similarities between religions that in theory were completely apart from each other for centuries.

That part of his work kinda makes some sense in my opinion.



posted on Jan, 19 2009 @ 12:22 AM
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reply to post by thomas_
 


Well I'm not familar with those parts of his ideas.



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