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SCI/TECH: Geochemical Transactions Goes Open Access

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posted on Nov, 29 2005 @ 05:54 PM
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Geochemical Transactions is the official journal of the Geochemistry Division of the American Chemical Society - and it is about to be launched by BioMed Central as an open access, peer-reviewed, online publication. The journal deals with chemistry relating to materials and processes occurring in terrestrial and extraterrestrial systems. Check it out if you're into organic geochemistry, inorganic geochemistry, marine and aquatic chemistry, chemical oceanography, biogeochemistry, applied geochemistry, astrobiology, or environmental geochemistry. Geochemical Transactions is indexed by ISI and starting in 2006, also will be indexed by PubMed. It currently has the third highest-ranking impact factor among geochemistry journals.
 




www.geochemicaltransactions.com

Geochemical Transactions is an open access, peer-reviewed, online journal soon to be launched by BioMed Central.

Geochemical Transactions will encompass all aspects of geochemistry. Geochemical Transactions is the official journal of the Geochemistry Division of the American Chemical Society.

The journal covers high-quality research in all areas of chemistry as it relates to materials and processes occurring in terrestrial and extraterrestrial systems, including: organic geochemistry, inorganic geochemistry, marine and aquatic chemistry, chemical oceanography, biogeochemistry, applied geochemistry, astrobiology, and environmental geochemistry. Geochemical Transactions offers scientists a unique opportunity to publish their research rapidly in an open access medium that is freely available online to researchers worldwide. Geochemical Transactions, launched in 2000, is indexed by ISI and presently has the third highest-ranking impact factor among geochemistry journals. Starting in 2006, all articles will also be indexed by PubMed. All manuscripts submitted to the journal are subject to rigorous peer review. Published material may include electronic supplementary material, such as animations (e.g., of global circulation models or geologic flow and convection) or data (e.g. raw spectra) that can be downloaded for a reader's use.



Please visit the link provided for the complete story.


Great news!

It seems like BioMed Central introduces a new Open Access science publication every week or two - and the science publishing world is getting very exciting. Open Access is good for science, in my opinion. Just like Open Source is good for the computer world.

I'm looking forward to my first issue of Geochemical Transactions.

[edit on 29-11-2005 by soficrow]




posted on Nov, 30 2005 @ 08:27 AM
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eh?

wheres the conspiracy in that??!



posted on Nov, 30 2005 @ 08:43 AM
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Good question.

Hmmm. Information is power. Most scientific research and information is privately owned, and protected by Intellectual Property Rights legislation. Even the published stuff costs mega-bucks just to look at - although most of it's paid for with our tax money and charitable donations.

So - Open Access is a conspiracy to help us take back what we already paid for anyway?



Hom I doin?



posted on Nov, 30 2005 @ 09:04 AM
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although most of it's paid for with our tax money and charitable donations.


Linky please...



wheres the conspiracy in that??!



It's a good conspiracy for a change.



posted on Nov, 30 2005 @ 09:38 AM
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sardion

soficrow
although most of it's paid for with our tax money and charitable donations.



Linky please...




Sardion - sorry. I know I've posted tons of budget stuff all over ATS, but can't pull anything up on a search right now - and I'm out of time.


I know the standard line is that drug developers invest millions-to-billions to bring a drug to market - but I think most of the money comes from us. Remember - the first rule of business is never use your own money.

...Aside from funding through the CDC and NIH, corporations benefit big time through the military budget, especially funds targeted for anti-bioweapons research. And the way the contracts work, the companies conducting the research hold the rights - they don't even have to publish their results or research reports.

...This is why the CDC held up releasing info on the 1918 Flu, and rights ownership was the real backroom controversy. Also, remember last year when the NIH suddenly made it a funding requirement that research results be published, and available to the public? The NIH circumvented the international corporations' hold on Congress and the Senate. Cool move, and it worked. But the boyz aren't happy about it.

The whole mess is sneaky, and dirty.



posted on Nov, 30 2005 @ 10:15 AM
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Information wants to be free...
with more freedom of info comes more responsibility of the public, which is the very thing that is being removed with the witholding of info.

So I guess we all just got an extension to our curfew and the keys to the car from daddy science



posted on Nov, 30 2005 @ 02:33 PM
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Open Source journals are gaining momentum as time goes on. Normally you'd have to pay for a relatively expensive annual subscription, or else be associated with a university or or resource that has purchased a really expensive site subscription.

Some journals are making things completely open, and others are charging the people who have the papers published a nominal fee to cover the operating costs, which, for a researcher, would make sense I'd think because you'd have to pay more to have subscriptions to all the various journals anyway.



posted on Dec, 1 2005 @ 04:10 PM
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IMO - Even though we're not quite in the same league, ATS is part of the Open Source movement, especially now that everything copyrighted under the Creative Commons terms. Love it.

Somehow I grew up believing that information and ideas belong to everyone, and are our greatest resource - as individuals, societies, cultures, even as a species. And that we're supposed to share - not hoard.

Don't know where I got that. Probably sci-fi. But until Open Access came along, that attitude made me some kinda weird anachronism.

Now, I'm just glad the rest of the world is finally catchin up with me.







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