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BUSINESS: 24/7 Drinking in England and Wales

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posted on Nov, 24 2005 @ 04:50 PM
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A new law that allows pubs to stay open twenty-four hours a day went into effect in England and Wales. Proponents feel that the new law will curb binge drinking because patrons will feel less obligated to down alcohol too fast just prior to closing. Opponents feel that this is all about money and that the social implications are being ignored for the sake of special interests groups. Alcohol accounts for forty percent of emergency room admissions in the UK and that number explodes to seventy percent after dark.
 



www.ctv.ca
Round-the-clock drinking is now a reality in England and Wales after new licensing laws came in force Thursday.

The first day of the relaxed drinking legislation began quietly despite continuing controversy and fearful headlines.

Police forces around the country reported no untoward incidents as more than 1,000 pubs, clubs and supermarkets took advantage of a new law that permits them to apply for 24-hour opening hours.

The new legislation has led to fears of increased binge drinking and disorder that critics say will put more pressure on police and hospitals.




Please visit the link provided for the complete story.


When I moved to New Orleans, I was dry, but in time I began to drink again and there is simply no place on earth to drink like the Big Easy. Bars there have never been forced to close and while all bars don't stay open all night, plenty do. There's something a little romantic and perhaps, reckless, about fighting a bout of insomnia with an early morning walk to a favorite watering hole for a drink or two.

I doubt that this change will have a long term measurable effect. Some individuals will take the freedom too far and others will feel less inclined to guzzle at closing time, but for most it will just mean that there are more choices. When I've lived in places where the bars do close, the only real difference was that the drinking just went to someone's home when the bars closed.

Related News Links:
www.leedstoday.net
www.drinks-business-review.com
news.bbc.co.uk
www.sunderlandtoday.co.uk


[edit on 2005/11/24 by GradyPhilpott]




posted on Nov, 24 2005 @ 05:11 PM
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Shockingly, I think this is a good thing.

When I was a bit younger, I used to go out to pubs and clubs every single Thursday, Friday, Saturday and Sunday and one of the things I noticed was the way those who caused trouble were either because they had three hours to get drunk and crammed it into a few hours or it was because all the pubs pushed 5000 people out into the same street at once.

Yeah, it'll cause an influx of later drinkers and more people drinking but in respect those people would have been drunk somewhere else - probably at home and to be honest, it is unfair to punish the innocent people who won't abuse this for those who do. It's a good change, now let's hope the large Cities will begin to place these in 'toleration zones', to make it easier to Police.



posted on Nov, 24 2005 @ 05:16 PM
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You can't really compare pub culture in America to pub culture in Britain.
The attitude towards drinking is totaly diferent.

For one drinking age is 18, and it might have changed but in the 80's when I lived there the drinking age was not enforced at a lot of pubs.
I was drinking in pubs when I was 14, we used to go to the "White Lion" and they knew we were underage but they served us as long as we stayed in the "lounge" and not the "bar", away from prying eyes.
(Most British pubs have a lounge and a comon bar)
It was comon to see 16 yr olds drinking in most pubs, especialy at the weekend.
Remember most of us were out of school and working at 16, or on the dole!

After hours clubs/Night clubs were a little harder to get into under 18, but seeing as our dvrs licenses have no photo's we would just "share" someones ID who was of age...

So IMO licencing hours are not the problem, it's just that you start drinking at an age where you are not really mature enough to be sensible about it and of course it carries on into adulthood.

People will still drink to get drunk. It was comon at work to go to the pub for lunch, drink a couple of pints (English pints btw bigger than U.S.) go back to work. Then hit the pub on the way home for a couple more. Go home, eat shower then go meet the lads at the pub for 6 or 7 pints before going home and crashing.

Also pubs play a much larger role in British culture than it does in the states.
Every neighbourhood has it's local and it's where people socialise with their neighbours and friends.

Also life in Britain, especialy if you live "up North" is pretty desolute compared to the states, not much else to do than go get drunk at the local.
Everything we did revolved around alcohol. No open container laws either, so after the pub closed it was walk around town with a beer in your hand.

Not saying all Brits are like this, but the of course we're not disusing them.

I hate American bars, they are depressing. Well most of them. In a city like New Orleans you have the exceptions of course. But I'm reffering to your local watering holes not tourist party bars.

Ever been to an ABC?



posted on Nov, 24 2005 @ 05:18 PM
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I think it is a good idea too.

Those who are saying that it will encourage more drinking etc etc, don't seem to take into account the following:



  1. People only have a finite amount of money to spend on booze
  2. It will stagger "kick out" times, reducing the amount of people on the streets at any given time, therefore reducing violence
  3. The police have been given extra powers in this bill to tackle drunken behaviour
  4. They cried when shops where allowed to sell booze on Sundays. The world didn't end then!
  5. It brings us into line with Europe (and Scotland) and they have less drunkeness than the UK.


What I do have a problem with is the Government taking a "peoples choice" stance on drinking, but gets all "Nanny state" about smoking, cannabis, driving, raising you children etc, amongst other things.

It makes them look inconsistent. Maybe they can let the People choose about other things too? Is that too much to ask? Or can we only be trusted to get drunk?



posted on Nov, 24 2005 @ 05:32 PM
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Actually, ANOK, a lot of what you mentioned still exists today but you are wrong on a few points.



No open container laws either, so after the pub closed it was walk around town with a beer in your hand.


This got changed in 2002, each town can now place 'zones' where alcohol can't be open or carried out of a bag otherwise it is between a £50 and £200[I think] fine.



So IMO licencing hours are not the problem, it's just that you start drinking at an age where you are not really mature enough to be sensible about it and of course it carries on into adulthood.


In my area they have got a lot toughter on this, two pubs shut down this year and one pub a week is checked for under-age children. Every pub now from Wednesday through to Sunday, IDs everyone unless they know they are old enough.

This has of course, forced children to buy alcohol from shops and then go to parks and caused another form of problem. Much of the violence in my town tends to be between drunk youths in parks, attacking people at night - muggings, etc, but this has nothing to do with licence laws.



posted on Nov, 24 2005 @ 05:36 PM
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Thanx for the corrections Odium...

Yes I've been out of Britain since '88 so I'm a little dated...

I know there were rumours about the open container thing even back then. thatcher was trying to ban open containers at one point but she was unsuccesfull then.



posted on Nov, 24 2005 @ 05:40 PM
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Originally posted by ANOK
Thanx for the corrections Odium...

Yes I've been out of Britain since '88 so I'm a little dated...

I know there were rumours about the open container thing even back then. thatcher was trying to ban open containers at one point but she was unsuccesfull then.


My town, Reading, has such a ban. It is quite a large area too and almost gets as far as my front door (I live about a mile from the City centre). The fine here is £200. Quite a pricey can of Stella if you are caught!



posted on Nov, 24 2005 @ 07:34 PM
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24/7 drinking...that's right baby!! wooooo another thing so us brits can have yet another thing to be proud of. right now i think we have the most teenage pregnancys in europes, biggest breasted women in europe, most drug taking, smoking, boozing people in europe...and now we welcome you all to join us in binge drinking at all ours of the day


you can buy a cigarette at a tesco store 24/7...why shouldn't you be able to get alcohol 24/7 also?

how many people honestly feel at 6am they need a drink? if you do then maybe you might want to think about getting some theoropy


i don't really think the law is a bad one, i don't think it's necessarily a good one either.

so we have 24/7 alcohol and cigarettes, which together kill way more people than all the illegal drugs put together...yet you can't have a legal bit of weed in a joint standing in the street, that's double standards. you can smoke a substance that originates from a tobacco plant and gets a load of chemicals added to it, but if you want to smoke something from a marajuana plant it's illegal? ahhhhh nothing makes sense!!



posted on Nov, 24 2005 @ 07:48 PM
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Regardless of the cultural difference between the US and England and the fact that I no longer drink, I still think that the 24/7 bars is a great idea. Maybe few people want to get out of bed and have a drink at six in the morning, but there are plenty of people who like to get off work at eleven in the evening and party till sunrise.

I've thrown some three day drunks in New Orleans and hit virtually every bar in the French Quarter, save a few of a certain sort. I was actually banned from Johnny White's, although I could still go around the corner to Johnny White's Sports Bar, which by the way is the only business in New Orleans to not close it's doors for business during Katrina.

I think after a couple of years, everyone except the hardcore tea-totalers will have forgotten that things were ever any different and most folks will be very happy with the situation.



posted on Nov, 24 2005 @ 08:03 PM
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Problem is Grady that most Brits who go on 3 day drunks would be beating the crap out of each other.

The 2 biggest past times in Britain, drinking and fighting...LOL (at least where I came from)

The drinking culture is different in more ways than you think.

Again, maybe things have changed since the 80's but I doubt things have got better.

[edit on 24/11/2005 by ANOK]



posted on Nov, 24 2005 @ 08:08 PM
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As a bouncer, this really is a great idea in regard to preventing fights and such.

Heaven forbid they pass this law in Austalia though
we already drink too much!
I personally don't go out drinking alot anymore, much prefer quiet drinks over dinner or at home, plus it's cheaper. I can't imagine how expensive it would be in the UK, can someone advise ?



posted on Nov, 24 2005 @ 08:18 PM
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Originally posted by ImJaded
As a bouncer, this really is a great idea in regard to preventing fights and such.

Heaven forbid they pass this law in Austalia though
we already drink too much!
I personally don't go out drinking alot anymore, much prefer quiet drinks over dinner or at home, plus it's cheaper. I can't imagine how expensive it would be in the UK, can someone advise ?


A pint of Stella or Kronenbourg would go for about £2.50 in my town, whereas weak-as-piss australian beer (
)goes for about £2. Real Ales and bitters tend to be slightly cheaper.



posted on Nov, 24 2005 @ 09:41 PM
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Another group of people that will be happy with this change are shift workers.

Now if someone works a graveyard shift, they can go out for a beer after work like the rest of us can.



posted on Nov, 24 2005 @ 11:05 PM
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Originally posted by Duzey
Another group of people that will be happy with this change are shift workers.

Now if someone works a graveyard shift, they can go out for a beer after work like the rest of us can.


Like me....

I work two 12 hour days (0700-1900), then two 12 hour nights (1900-0700) with four days off between. So now I can go to the pub when I finish work



posted on Nov, 25 2005 @ 02:37 AM
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i think this is a good idea. there needs to be at least one place open 24/7, at least in a bigger city.

a couple of times i have been looking for a place to keep drinking at 7 in the morning, only to find nothing.

and wats wrong with australian beers?

at least we drink our cold, not warm and flat.

any country near when guiness is made really dont get a say in wat a good beer is



posted on Nov, 25 2005 @ 03:02 AM
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After hours clubs/Night clubs were a little harder to get into under 18, but seeing as our dvrs licenses have no photo's we would just "share" someones ID who was of age...


This has now changed as well. The 'old-style' license has been replaced by a photocard license.

I don't think the later opening hours are a bad idea. In my area in London, most of the pubs have set 2:00 AM as their closing hours instead of the usual 11:00 pm.

The only immediate problem I see with this is:

1. Buses and cabs being less frequent (especially if there aren't night buses in your area)

2. Kabab shops will have to re-adjust their hours



posted on Nov, 29 2005 @ 12:45 AM
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I was looking up some info on my alma maters, UNO and Tulane, and ran across this site that lists New Orleans eateries and whether or not they are open for business. I was very interested to see if Igor's on St. Charles was open. I've had many wonderful experiences there, including the time during carnival when I went in there to go to the restroom between parades. I couldn't believe my eyes. On the bar was a naked woman and licking her belly button was a fully uniformed New Orleans police officers. Now, I was no newcomer to carnival but that was the most bizarre thing I had seen to date. The following workday, I was at one of the stores for the company I worked for and I was telling this story to one of the salesgirls.

She gasped and said something to the effect of, "Oh my God, that's Woody!"

I said, "What?"

She said, "That was my ex-husband. He's been working Igor's during Carnival for years."

Small world.

Anyway this description of Igor's is priceless and so characteristic of New Orleans. Check out the drink specials.





Igor's Lounge
Location: Uptown
2133 St. Charles Ave.
504-522-2145

A combination pool hall, laundromat and bar, it also has a restaurant next door in the form Igor's Garlic Clove. Several scenes from the motion picture "The Pelican Brief" were shot in and around Igor's. Easily accessible by the St. Charles St.car this bar offers great drinks at reasonable prices ( drink specials from 5 a.m. until 7 a.m.).

Attire: Casual
Credit Cards: all major credit cards
Hours: 24 hours

www.neworleansonline.com...




posted on Nov, 29 2005 @ 05:37 PM
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Just something you guys might like to know, ITV [Tonight] did a show yeseterday. Everywhere but London has had a drop in alcohol related crime since the introduction of the ban and a drop in A&E intakes for alcohol related abuse.

Again, the common sense crowd seem to be right about this one. Shockingly, longer hours do not mean suddenly we all get enough money to become alcoholics. :O Imagine that.



posted on Feb, 7 2006 @ 07:14 PM
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Booze Britian? Drink-fuelled crime and violence slump after new licensing laws take effect

We were warned: Liberalisation of drink laws would fuel disorder
The sober truth: Serious violent crime has fallen 21% - and is down by twice that in some towns - while there are 14% fewer woundings
As for drinks firms? They are reporting no windfall profits


www.independent.co.uk

Thats been over two months now and it seems its good news all round.

Now, when they gonna do the same up here in Scotland??!



[edit on 7-2-2006 by glastonaut]



posted on Feb, 7 2006 @ 07:21 PM
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Well, think of it the smart way.

Licence change, but the amount of cash doesn't. Which means, people go to the pubs, whenever they can rather than being forced to go between set hours. I've done pub work for years, the largest problems come when they are all forced out together.




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