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Ask a WW2 battle of the bulge bronze star medal vet! right now

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posted on Nov, 23 2005 @ 09:43 PM
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Ask my grandfather a question...He was awarded a bronze medal for Battle of the Bulge 1944!




posted on Nov, 23 2005 @ 10:24 PM
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How was the moral of your fellow troops during those days? I would suspect that it was so low that you all were allmost at your breaking points.



posted on Nov, 23 2005 @ 10:40 PM
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Originally posted by Classified Info
How was the moral of your fellow troops during those days? I would suspect that it was so low that you all were allmost at your breaking points.



youre right
I was wearing everything I owned "ODs" and long underwear
combat suit and over coat green wool cap and helmet...socks I warmed them under my arms...I had crapped myself..Iwas scared but I knew the people we were fighting for were MORE scared.......the moral...our support left us.....Moral down..I was so damn cold! Good gloves but I was cold ...I had so much at my disposal..guns up the wazzooo... 175s..lit up the night like it was day...but moral during the night I earned the medal, was horrible

--Frank Volponi 9th armored div
typed by his grandaughter
(you made his night by asking thank you)



posted on Nov, 23 2005 @ 10:57 PM
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The brutal cold and how soldiers can deal with that has allways amazed me. Sometimes my work forces me to go outside for a couple hours at a time, and I can barely get through it. And I am dressed well for the cold too.

But to have to be out in the cold hour after hour, day after day after day, with no relief in sight.......I just cant imagine it. I dont think that I would be able to survive it. And those that have gone through such an ordeal I have a great amount of respect for.

Thanks for your reply and service and happy ThanksGiving



posted on Nov, 23 2005 @ 11:08 PM
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Originally posted by Classified Info
The brutal cold and how soldiers can deal with that has allways amazed me. Sometimes my work forces me to go outside for a couple hours at a time, and I can barely get through it. And I am dressed well for the cold too.

But to have to be out in the cold hour after hour, day after day after day, with no relief in sight.......I just cant imagine it. I dont think that I would be able to survive it. And those that have gone through such an ordeal I have a great amount of respect for.

Thanks for your reply and service and happy ThanksGiving



thanks for your reply so much appreciated! you made his night



posted on Nov, 23 2005 @ 11:17 PM
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If there are any other questions they will be answered with enthusiasm tomorrow or next week thanks so much for givin an old man his moment

Hapy thanksgiving



posted on Nov, 23 2005 @ 11:22 PM
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That was so cool. Thank you for that. You'll never know how much I appreciated that.

Let him know that we are all still proud of him and his , even after all this time!


Happy Thanksgiving.



posted on Nov, 23 2005 @ 11:38 PM
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Originally posted by makeitso
That was so cool. Thank you for that. You'll never know how much I appreciated that.

Let him know that we are all still proud of him and his , even after all this time!


Happy Thanksgiving.


Oh man you are the best..he just went to bed so excited someone was interested...I will show him your response...we found a website about his division, he thinks hes famous now...I said you always were...You are a hero.
he liberated a concentration camp....His empathy for humanity is golden. He is a dying breed, literally



posted on Nov, 24 2005 @ 01:29 AM
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I don't really have any specific questions, but would love to hear any stories he'd like to share. I've studied a lot about WWII, but not as much in the European Theater, so would love to hear more. Especially from someone who was there.

And definately say Thank You and God Bless for serving.

[edit on 11/24/2005 by Zaphod58]



posted on Nov, 24 2005 @ 02:22 AM
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Originally posted by xxKrisxx
..he just went to bed so excited someone was interested...


Interested???

Man, I could sit down for hours and talk with someone like your GrandDad, it would be a great experience.



posted on Nov, 24 2005 @ 02:48 AM
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I agree. I could sit there for DAYS talking to him about this. I'm a huge WWII buff, and would LOVE to be able to sit down with a vet.

Oh, btw, what unit was he in?

[edit on 11/24/2005 by Zaphod58]



posted on Nov, 24 2005 @ 06:10 PM
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Originally posted by Zaphod58
I don't really have any specific questions, but would love to hear any stories he'd like to share. I've studied a lot about WWII, but not as much in the European Theater, so would love to hear more. Especially from someone who was there.

And definately say Thank You and God Bless for serving.

[edit on 11/24/2005 by Zaphod58]

(XXkrisXX is writing for Frank)

I was a tank commander...I was left behind by my support...The Germans didnt see me, I was near luxenberg...I was on top of a hill ....the company went down into the valley and left me up top....I had perfect view of the enemies coordinates....So I called the coordinates into the company in the valley...they nailed each enemy vehicle as they approached. Iwas damn cold though...It was a week I was up there....When I was in the open, I heard the bullets flying /....my jeeps got wrecked by heavy fire...I pulled back and there I stayed for about a week....Kept calling in the points and took out alot of enemy vehicles...This was part of th Battle of the Bulge, and this is when I earned my medal.
Frank


(thanks,
Kris)



posted on Nov, 24 2005 @ 06:13 PM
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Very cool! It sounds like quite the adventure. Glad you were able to come through ok. Thank you for your service, and keep the stories coming if you don't mind. I love to hear stories from veterans.



posted on Nov, 24 2005 @ 06:13 PM
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Originally posted by Zaphod58
I agree. I could sit there for DAYS talking to him about this. I'm a huge WWII buff, and would LOVE to be able to sit down with a vet.

Oh, btw, what unit was he in?

[edit on 11/24/2005 by Zaphod58]


9th armored div, 19 tank battalion? Tank commander ...I dont know if that answered the question he isnt next to me right now



posted on Nov, 24 2005 @ 06:14 PM
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That's exactly what I was looking for thanks.
I appreciate all the information you are passing on. It's VERY interesting.



posted on Nov, 24 2005 @ 06:21 PM
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Originally posted by Zaphod58
That's exactly what I was looking for thanks.
I appreciate all the information you are passing on. It's VERY interesting.


I hope my U2u went thru if not Ill send again



posted on Nov, 24 2005 @ 06:32 PM
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I just got it actually. Thank you so much for that information. I DEFINATELY plan to follow up on it.



posted on Nov, 24 2005 @ 11:18 PM
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Here are a few questions, including one from my mother.

1. How long was he in Europe?
2. Was he involved in D-Day, or did he arrive after?
3. My mother is a mental health care nurse working with veterans, and she is wondering how he handled after the war (coming home, adjusting to peace time). She would like to know why there were so few WWII veterans that suffered from PTSD as compared to later wars. Did he talk about his experiences with someone, etc.

I am looking into a program that my mother knows about where you get a packet, and have a veteran either write about, or tape record his experiences, so that there is a record of them. Would he be interested in that?

I would love to hear more stories from him. Anything he would like to share would be VERY appreciated.



posted on Nov, 25 2005 @ 12:28 PM
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Please express gratitude on my behalf, for being such a brave person, and a patriotic american. His contribution to that battle was essential to the success of it, and the war in general.

My question: what was being a soldier like back then?



posted on Nov, 25 2005 @ 05:21 PM
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Originally posted by Zaphod58
Here are a few questions, including one from my mother.

1. How long was he in Europe?
2. Was he involved in D-Day, or did he arrive after?
3. My mother is a mental health care nurse working with veterans, and she is wondering how he handled after the war (coming home, adjusting to peace time). She would like to know why there were so few WWII veterans that suffered from PTSD as compared to later wars. Did he talk about his experiences with someone, etc.

I am looking into a program that my mother knows about where you get a packet, and have a veteran either write about, or tape record his experiences, so that there is a record of them. Would he be interested in that?

I would love to hear more stories from him. Anything he would like to share would be VERY appreciated.



There for 1 year......No post traumatic stress...Everyone got home before him...so he wasnt recieved with a parade, or party...but noone gave him garbage for fighting ..he was well respected (hes saying now) unlike the viet nam vets returning, who were not respected upon return..."I was happy to be home" and live went on a usual




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