ATS.C: ATStrogen 01

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posted on Nov, 21 2005 @ 09:29 PM
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Ladies this might be of interest
www.cdc.gov...
It's called a preview, I assume there is a more lengthy version of this perhaps with several updates.

Rebuilding After the Tsunamis: Addressing Infectious Diseases in Indonesia

Epidemic-Prone Disease Surveillance and Response After the Tsunami in Aceh Province, Indonesia

btw I donated money to Save the Children for both Tsunami and Quake Relief, and this podcast made me check to see what they were up to and I was able to find their six month report which stated that they have committed to a 5 year plan and shows their spending.
www.savethechildren.org...#

there is also info on the Pakistan quake and fear of more deaths as winter sets in.




[edit on 11-21-2005 by worldwatcher]




posted on Nov, 21 2005 @ 10:34 PM
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Thanks for those links, WW. I'm definitely going to check them out... looks like they've got some good info in them.

I'm glad to hear the organisation you gave money to has that information accessible to you.



posted on Nov, 21 2005 @ 10:53 PM
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PODcast: ATStrogen 01 (reply 4)
A burning question on the minds of ATS members... what's your cat's name?

length: 05:42
file: atscpod_982.mp3
size: 2333k
feed:
status: live (at time of posting)




posted on Nov, 22 2005 @ 05:22 AM
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parr,

This link has monthly updates of various issues in Southeast Asia. It's the UN relief website:

www.reliefweb.int...

[edit on 11-22-2005 by Valhall]



posted on Nov, 22 2005 @ 09:54 PM
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PODcast: ATStrogen 01 (reply 5)
Reply to SO and answering some questions.

length: 10:00
file: atscpod_987.mp3
size: 11150k
feed:
status: live (at time of posting)




posted on Nov, 22 2005 @ 10:00 PM
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And Just to clarify a point regarding people thinking they know what's wrong. What I meant, but so eleoquently didn't include
is that based on massive marketing people think they know what'll fix 'em up as the drugs are promoted to a huge degree but the negative effects aren't highlighted to the point that they should be or are quietly omitted. This can lead to people self-diagnosing and leading them to request medications and doctors indulging... for some reason.



posted on Nov, 23 2005 @ 04:31 AM
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I think the other problem is that the drugs are often prescribed by the primary care physician, who just don't have the expertise to be giving them out. They should be prescribed by by a specialist after an evaluation and then monitored.

I know quite a few cases of bi-polar disorder where Prozac was handed out like candy for "depression". Guess what Prozac does if you are bi-polar? It makes you cycle more frequently and more intensely, often leading to suicide. In the case of bi-polar you almost have to be medicated, but there is no magic combination of pills, and without a proper diagnosis and close scrutiny of how the scripts are affecting you, it's very difficult to keep it under control and/or not make it worse instead of better.

I was also a vicitm of the idea that depression medications help with pain years back, originally diagnosed with Fibromyalgia. I remember getting to the point where one night I told DH, somethings wrong, please watch me like a hawk, I don't want to kill myself, but I think I'm going to (hard to explain the feeling). I really was in fear for my life, and had been for over a week. I was going to bed afraid I would just get up in the middle of the night and do "something". I stopped the meds, but do you have any idea that this diagnosis is running rampant in the US and anti-depressants are considered one of the basic staples for a physical condition? It is frightening.

I also noticed Zoloft is becoming one of the common pieces of menopause treatment - but again - for the physical symptoms (suppossedly helps relieve hot flashes).

So, these mind altering drugs are now commonly handed out for pyhsical complaints in a lot of cases. It's really frightening.



posted on Nov, 23 2005 @ 08:54 PM
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Originally posted by Relentless
I think the other problem is that the drugs are often prescribed by the primary care physician, who just don't have the expertise to be giving them out. They should be prescribed by by a specialist after an evaluation and then monitored.


Exactly, Relentless, and this is something I mentioned. Oftentimes a prescription for these sorts of drugs will be given after a 10-15 minute appointment! What the hell? Can you really assess a patient in that short a time and give them a prescription based on that?


I also noticed Zoloft is becoming one of the common pieces of menopause treatment - but again - for the physical symptoms (suppossedly helps relieve hot flashes).


That really is concerning, particularly when there are plenty of natural alternatives (including diet) that really will help with the physical symptoms of menopause and perhaps even eliminate the need for hormone replacement.





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