It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Illuminati Symbolism in British Currency?

page: 1
0

log in

join
share:

posted on Nov, 18 2005 @ 12:19 PM
link   
Quite a few things have been discussed about Masonic/Illuminati symbolism in US currency.

Has anyone ever noticed the pyramid with the capstone missing in the £50 British bank note?? See below...





FYI, the £50 note in the UK is the highest denomination bank note (hence the most powerful?)

PS- Am I going crazy reading to much into things that may be explained by coincidence? Or is there a hidden way of communicating using esoteric symbolism??? Maybe I have finally opened my eyes...(or eye??)

[edit on 18/11/05 by Jah Warrior 108]




posted on Nov, 18 2005 @ 12:45 PM
link   

Originally posted by Jah Warrior 108
Quite a few things have been discussed about Masonic/Illuminati symbolism in US currency.


Quite a bit of NONSENSE, yes.


Has anyone ever noticed the pyramid with the capstone missing in the £50 British bank note?? See below...


Nope. I see a TRIANGLE, with three sides/points, like ALL triangles. No "capstone missing" that I can see. For clarity, that triangle also seems to contain a number -- "50" -- which I'd say it's safe to assume is the denomination of the note in question.


Or is there a hidden way of communicating using esoteric symbolism???


Sure. What could the folks who designed the money have been trying to "communicate"? And to Whom?

To quote Freud: "Sometimes a cigar is just a CIGAR"


PS- Am I going crazy reading to much into things that may be explained by coincidence?


Naaaaahhh...
But you DO seem to be seeing "pyramid with the capstone missing" where (ahem) "OTHER" (ahem) people see triangles. You might want to give some thought to what that says about your "eyes...(or eye??)"

DD



posted on Nov, 18 2005 @ 01:47 PM
link   
The pyramid is not missing its capstone, its a complete triangle. Also, I'm pretty sure that there are pound notes bigger than 50.

edit:

ok, apparently they don't. Screw you england. Screw you for proving me wrong.
Your money is colored (notice the distinct lack of a 'u') the wrong way anyway double




[edit on 18-11-2005 by Nygdan]



posted on Nov, 18 2005 @ 01:59 PM
link   
there really isnt anything too mysterious about the triangle. it most probably is illuminati symbolism, but nowhere near enough evidence for us to speculate it. I do believe that if we are fascinated by this topic and are on the search for the truth, we have to use our head and not get carried away.

I will put this purely down to paranoia



posted on Nov, 18 2005 @ 02:00 PM
link   
Well, considering who has been placed in charge of the UK Mint ( a little above 33 degree Mason by the name of "Prince" Phillip) are you surprised to see Masonic symbolism on the currency?



posted on Nov, 18 2005 @ 02:31 PM
link   
Okay maybe I am reading too much into things, maybe the capstone isn't quite missing, but IMHO its very close to being missing. Also if I were designing the £50 and it was my intent to put some occult symbolism into it, I wouldn't do it as blatently as one the $1 bill, it would be much more subtle.....

Just thought It was weird is all.....


FYI, the £50 is the highest denomination note in circulation. A £1 Million note exists apparently but is only used internally within the Bank of England. see wiki

Also the £50 was out of circulation for a since 1943 and was re-introduced in 1981 with Sir Christopher Wren and his St. Pauls cathedral on it. Wasn't ol' Christopher a mason? And a very high ranking one at that?



posted on Nov, 18 2005 @ 03:06 PM
link   

Originally posted by jagzz
I will put this purely down to paranoia


Maybe your right but while I was writing this post I did find some funny coincidences.


The Bank of England is the central bank of the United Kingdom, sometimes known as "The Old Lady of Threadneedle Street" or "The Old Lady". from wiki


I wonder who they are referring to when they say "the Old Lady", hmm doubt it's the Queen. Oh I got it, its Lady Britannia or in her American form Lady Liberty.
Strange that Lady Liberty is very much like the Egyptian Isis who in turn is very much alike to the Babylonian Queen Semiramis, wife of Nimrod, mother of Tammuz.

Some people hold the opinion that Freemasonry is much older than just the middle ages
and traces its origins back to Biblical times with Nimrod as the founder.

Sheeesh, maybe I am too paranoid…… I just linked the Bank of England to a Bible character who some claim to be the ancient founder of freemasonry

[edit on 18/11/05 by Jah Warrior 108]

[edit on 18/11/05 by Jah Warrior 108]



posted on Nov, 18 2005 @ 03:18 PM
link   
If you look at the rest of UK notes in circulation you will see varying shapes at the bottom. On the £5 there is a circle, on the £10 and £20, squares at different angles. If you look at the notes in circulation before these, you will also find that these had shapes on them too.
The answer for their being there is not conspiratorial though. The shapes were put there to help people with poor eyesight to differentiate the notes from one another. Not only can the notes be differentiated by the look of the shapes at the bottom, but they also have texture. Next time you hold a note, run your finger over the shape and you can feel it. It's sort of a braille for currency.

In the meantime: Nygdan. I have a £75 note. It's yours for $50.



posted on Nov, 18 2005 @ 09:00 PM
link   
Your original post linked an image of the red triangle.

The text that surrounded that image on the source site says "Recognition symbol – like all Bank of England notes the £50 carries a unique recognition symbol on the front of the note that acts as a recognition symbol for the partially sighted. On the £50 note, this is a densely coloured red triangle with the number ‘50’"

Further, other notes have squares, circles and diamonds for similar reasons.

Triangles aren't pyramids, squares aren't cubes, and circles aren't globes.

Again, "sometimes a cigar is just a cigar"

DD

Edit: Rookie Formatting

[edit on 18-11-2005 by Dedicated_Dad]



posted on Nov, 19 2005 @ 09:22 AM
link   
yes DD, I am well aware it is a recognition symbol used for the partially sighted. I should maybe have made that clearer in my post.

The message I intended to convey was further discussion of the similarity of the recognition symbol on the most powerful bank note of the British Currency and possible Masonic/Illuminati connection. If you noticed the title of the post had a question mark in it.

Also in my subsequent posts I showed that the Bank of England did have links with Freemasonry. I am simply prompting further discussion into the matter.

As I said, yes maybe I am reading a bit too much into things


"sometimes a cigar is just a cigar"


But didn't Freud also say:
"He that has eyes to see and ears to hear may convince himself that no mortal can keep a secret. If his lips are silent, he chatters with his fingertips."

My point is that a self-professed secret organisation like Freemasonry
has secret symbols and signs that are used by the members and initiates and I would like to get to know a bit more about them and their beliefs



Originally posted by Dedicated_Dad
2d Thinking in a 3d world
In your opinion.

Or maybe 11D thinking in a 12D Universe



posted on Nov, 19 2005 @ 10:08 AM
link   
well , if the idea was to promote Freemasonry or whatever the Illuminatti is. Then I have to say I would have picked the smaller denominations.

Nobody wants the £ 50 notes you cant get anyone to change the dam things.

I usually end up putting them in the Bank, just to get rid of the inconvenience.



posted on Nov, 19 2005 @ 01:26 PM
link   

Originally posted by Jah Warrior 108
My point is that a self-professed secret organisation like Freemasonry
has secret symbols and signs that are used by the members and initiates and I would like to get to know a bit more about them and their beliefs




Sure, you would.
But don't make the mistake of seeing connections everywhere.
Down that road lurks paranoia.

As for the Bank of England being founded by Freemasons?
As this link shows: en.wikipedia.org..., the BoE was founded by a Scotsman named William Paterson. Nowhere though, can I find evidence that he was a Freemason. It's highly likely that Freemasonry was in existence at the time of the founding of the BoE (although the first Grand Lodge wasn't founded until some 20 years later) but Paterson doesn't show up as a Mason in any info that I can find.

Regarding Christopher Wren: it is entirely possible that he was a Freemason (he was a founding member of the Royal Society too), but yet again we have no evidence that he was actually a member. Personally, I would like to believe that he was. But to my mind, he is on the bank-note purely because he was one of the greatest architects that this country has ever seen.

Incidentally, it should also be noted that Charles Dickens is on the £10 note. Of all people of consequence (and by that I mean people who have left a great legacy with their work) Dickens was probably the only noted critic of Freemasonry. Whether this was because he genuinely disliked Masonry or purely because he thought that the Freemasons of his day weren't "pulling their weight" is open to question (don't forget he was a champion of the poor and an activist within the judicial system both in the UK and US). It should also be noted that Dickens was a bit of an anti-Semite too though (one example is his character "Fagin") and he could have been buying into conspiracies himself or he could just have had a thing about minority groups.
But it is certainly interesting that perhaps the only noted "anti-Mason" in UK history is featured on a bank-note when one regards your theory. Truth to tell, I think that it rather goes to show that Freemasonry isn't connected to the BoE in the way in which you think - after all, if you paint a picture of your family, you don't focus all your brushwork on the ugly maiden aunt do you?





[edit on 19-11-2005 by Leveller]



posted on Nov, 19 2005 @ 01:56 PM
link   

Originally posted by Jah Warrior 108
My point is that a self-professed secret organisation like Freemasonry
has secret symbols and signs that are used by the members and initiates and I would like to get to know a bit more about them and their beliefs

I'd just like to be slightly off-topic and more than slightly repetitive by saying that
(a) freemasonry doesn't profess to be secret
(b) doesn't have secret symbols

although admittedly we have some secret signs.

There is a great deal of information available about masonic symbology on the net and in books, plus there are a number of people on this site who will be only to happy to answer your questions about masonic symbols.

However I doubt TC will allow it as its too chummy and not conspiratorial enough



posted on Nov, 19 2005 @ 02:07 PM
link   

I wonder who they are referring to when they say "the Old Lady"


Read about the story of the Old Lady here.

An interesting story, not least because of the complete absence of any reference to Britannia, Liberty, Isis or Uncle Tom Cobbley.



new topics

top topics



 
0

log in

join