It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Military ROTC at High Schools

page: 1
0

log in

join
share:

posted on Nov, 6 2005 @ 09:15 AM
link   
I know some people in Navy ROTC at my school, and I've noticed that all any of them do is stuff related to ROTC, and ever since the first week of school they're obsessed with joining the Navy. I asked one of them what they do in class and they said that the "just watch videos." Because they're so devoted to ROTC and the drill teams before and after school, none of them have any time to do anything not related to the military. It's like the military is trying to rule their lives.

Does this sound like military brainwashing to anyone else here?




posted on Nov, 6 2005 @ 10:30 AM
link   
I know some people in my school that are in ROTC programs too... I cant say as if they are obsessed or anything... but they are definitely trained in to thinking a certain way...



posted on Nov, 6 2005 @ 09:36 PM
link   
Aparently you don't understand the DEDICATION it takes to be in the military. You DO have to devote a lot of your time to it - that's how you become a good soldier (or sailor).

It's the same thing with athletes. Have you guys ever known any elite athletes?

Let me tell you, as a former highly recruited highschool football player - it takes just about all of your time and energy. You spend your days in school, your afternoons in practice, your early evening lifting, your nights studying and then you do it all over. On Saterdays you wake up to play a game, you do work saterday night, and sundays you start it all over.

Now, that is for a football player who only has to deal with basically a 6 month season.

I can only imagine if these guys are going into the military, the type of time it must take up.

In the end, they are going to get a pay check and a free education - thats better then college athletes, who get a scholarship, a pathetic bit of money for food, and almost no chance at a pro career in their sport.

But no, they must be brain washed because they have goals, direction, a career path in their lives



posted on Nov, 6 2005 @ 09:51 PM
link   
The problem is they arent in the military they are in ROTC. I don't even think being in ROTC in highschool does anything special compared to attending college and joining ROTC. Maybe they are obsessed with the military and they let or make it consume all their time?



posted on Nov, 6 2005 @ 10:22 PM
link   
They are in the Reserve Officer Training Corps.

They are in training. It is the same type of comitment as a student-athlete (believe me, I looked into it after I blew my knee out). You train everyday, have obligations you have to meet etc etc. Actually, it may be a bit less, but my point is clear. It is a very large commitment because what you get back is of great value.

Just because YOU do not know what it is like to dedicate yourself to something, don't say that these peoples lives are controled by the military. In fact, it is very much the opposite - they have made a WILLING choice to join, and so have actually taken control of their own lives.



posted on Nov, 6 2005 @ 10:28 PM
link   
I would venture to say that most, if not all, of the people that join a ROTC class are already military bound. The fact that they're taking a course thats specifically designed to train the student of the workings, teachings, and structure of the military is the big clue.

No one is being forced to take the class. And I'm sure a few "undecided" will eventually sway toward enlisting after learning about what the military has to offer, but it's by no means 'brainwashing'.



posted on Nov, 6 2005 @ 10:29 PM
link   
If you look around, you will see many students obsessed with all kinds of things, not just ROTC. Computer geeks, jocks, gamesters, guitar players etc. I know it's strange, but not everyone is into fast cars, partys and wimmin. I think it's called human diversity. Ridged structure is needed by some kids, while others crave the chaos of youth. Regardless of the path; LIVE AND LET LIVE!



posted on Nov, 6 2005 @ 10:46 PM
link   

Originally posted by QuietSoul
I would venture to say that most, if not all, of the people that join a ROTC class are already military bound. The fact that they're taking a course thats specifically designed to train the student of the workings, teachings, and structure of the military is the big clue.

No one is being forced to take the class. And I'm sure a few "undecided" will eventually sway toward enlisting after learning about what the military has to offer, but it's by no means 'brainwashing'.




As a teacher in a school with a two and half year old program, I wholeheartedly agree with QuietSoul. As a veteran, a lot of students ask me about the military as a possible vocation after high school. Many of them either are in the JROTC or join it. Having spent some time with the cadets and their instructors, I find that the curriculum is centered around leadership development, military history, drill, discipline ... all subjects that will help anyone who wants to be successful, in or out of the military.

I have also found that the JROTC program has turned around some students I had serious concerns about. More than one kid has really responded to the discipline, the sense of belonging, the espirit de corp that are all hallmarks of the military. We have had several students who have gone to college who I thought that would never make it out of high school.

Brainwashing? Naah - that's what MTV and BET are for...



posted on Nov, 7 2005 @ 02:25 AM
link   
I was in JROTC in High School, so I can help you out here. While sure we had to wear uniforms once a week, and do drill and ceremony once or twice a week, the majority of our classes were NOT about the military. The classes were two parts by the two different instructors, for example, my Aerospace Science 300 class was the science of space flight, where we obviously learned about space flight and rocket propulsion, the other half of the course by the other instructor was financial discipline and investing. and while yes, you are more of a target for recruiters, ALL extracurriculars, including drill team/colorguard were OPTIONAL. Many of my ROTC buddies did go on to join the military, but they had this mindset before the joined the program, many of my other buddies, and myself, went on to college, or to the workforce. The fact is JROTC gives education on how to be a good citizen, and how to manage yourself and be a leader in everyday life, combined with a science aspect whether it be the history of aviation, or the science of flight, and I would most definetly say it is not a tool for brainwashing.



posted on Nov, 9 2005 @ 08:32 PM
link   
Most people I know in ROTC don't even want to join the military. ROTC (at my school) is more of a place where you can meet new friends. Trust me on this one.



posted on Nov, 10 2005 @ 02:53 PM
link   
They chose to participate in the ROTC. They're being taught something. It's not very different than claiming evolution or physics or anything we learn in school is brainwashing. In fact, learning skills (ROTC) as opposed to facts (class) is even less like brainwashing.

Conditioning, maybe, but not brainwashing.



posted on Nov, 14 2005 @ 09:06 PM
link   

Originally posted by invader_chris
I know some people in Navy ROTC at my school, and I've noticed that all any of them do is stuff related to ROTC, and ever since the first week of school they're obsessed with joining the Navy.


Are they as obsessed with the Navy as the jocks are with football? Or the nerds with computers?

Different strokes for different folks I guess.



posted on Nov, 15 2005 @ 11:04 PM
link   
It is all just a plan to get young men and women to sign up and go to war ---

The war is hungry and Haliburton needs money...

I was in ROTC and ended up in Nicaragua



posted on Nov, 25 2005 @ 12:35 AM
link   
I was in AFJROTC at 2 high schools. And almost every HS where I lived had Army, AIr Force, Navy, or Marine Corps JROTCS. In most cases I think cause and effect get confused, people that have certain personalities (who are like that or want to try something like that) chose to join. It's also kind of like a more adult or military version of Boy Scouts. A lot of people join the drill team, I don't know why, but in a way it's fun (when you're in school at least). I think people join the drill team becuase they can't do other extra-curriculars or are too shy or whatever. There were no pressures to join the military, in fact most JROTC Commanders encourage and assist in helping students get to college. An incentive is that you get to be an E-2 or an E-3 if you do join the military. I will say that diffent Services Recruiters would come by to answer questions. But, Disney is more sinister than JROTC.



posted on Nov, 25 2005 @ 12:49 AM
link   
I was in AFJROTC in high school. It was a great program. Several people that went into it with me had no plans to join the military after school, but liked the discipline, and opportunities so much that they jumped at the chance to join up. It's a great program and helps you build self discipline and responsibility.



posted on Nov, 25 2005 @ 09:49 AM
link   
I was a cadet in AFJROTC and my aspiration was to become a test pilot and then to be an astronaut.

It wasn't meant to be. It wasn't just a matter of watching videos when I was in it.

We learned about aircraft and how they flew; atomic energy, and survival amongst many other things.

I was in it for four years and part of my training meant that I helped the learning disabled.

I was on colourguard and drill team and got promoted to three stripes, before I finished school.

The recruiters told me that I was too small to follow my dream. However, it made me more aware of aircraft and how to identify them.

I acquired other skills while studying as a cadet and don't regret a moment of it.



new topics

top topics



 
0

log in

join