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posted on Nov, 4 2005 @ 11:34 AM
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Alright well, going off of what ShadowXIX said. It is hard to contain the plasma after it leaves the gun because the gas will expand in all directions. I was sitting in astronomy today and we were watching a video over the planets and I had the idea that what if there was a way to model the plasma gun after the planets. First have a iron core and spin the core until it gains a magnetic field (gravity) and either charge the particles of the gas to postive or negative ions. Next, take the gas and and reverse the charge and therefor it will attract to the opposite charge of the iron core. I would go with the magnetic field thing before I tried to spin the iron core fast enough to develop a pull of gravity (or however you make gravity I'm not to sure).




posted on Nov, 4 2005 @ 12:29 PM
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I read that thread and remember ShadowXIX's post and even made a post in the orginal thread but that thread seems dead.


I was thinking about what Shadow said and I was wondering if there isnt some way that a laser couldnt be used to burn a path for the plasma bullet or packet to travel in? My thought was that plasma is like electricity or water in that it takes the path of least resistance which you might be able to create with a laser? Im just thinking out loudly and dont know if that would work or even makes sense.

Your iron core being magnatized or whatever seems like it might be feasible, but would you shoot the iron core with the plasma? What if they could put gas in some type of magnetic containment device and charge just the gas one way (positive or negative) and then inject more gas charged the other way? Would that create a gas ball that could be turned into plasma?



posted on Nov, 4 2005 @ 03:14 PM
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yep that would work out nicely, i didn't even think of that. way to think outside the box lol.



posted on Nov, 13 2005 @ 06:02 PM
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Originally posted by seeuathemovies
Alright well, going off of what ShadowXIX said. It is hard to contain the plasma after it leaves the gun because the gas will expand in all directions. I was sitting in astronomy today and we were watching a video over the planets and I had the idea that what if there was a way to model the plasma gun after the planets. First have a iron core and spin the core until it gains a magnetic field (gravity) and either charge the particles of the gas to postive or negative ions. Next, take the gas and and reverse the charge and therefor it will attract to the opposite charge of the iron core. I would go with the magnetic field thing before I tried to spin the iron core fast enough to develop a pull of gravity (or however you make gravity I'm not to sure).


It would be much more efficient to just use a simple 5.56 OR 7.62 standard round. I don't see how using it to make a plasma round would be any more effective in combat...it jsut adds more things to corrupt the firing procedure, and bullet itself.



posted on Nov, 13 2005 @ 07:46 PM
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firstplacerifles I agree that it probably would'nt make that much sense in a conventional rifle, but you can't shoot missiles down with one either, and no 5.56 or 7.62 can go 3,000km per second
I think a 7.62 only does like 3,000feet per second


What I pasted below is from the orginal thread about the Shiva Star weapon




In the early 1990s, the US Air Force was preparing tests at Kirtland Air Force Base, New Mexico, designed to lead to a ground-based plasma-weapon in the late 1990s capable of firing plasma bullets at incoming ballistic missile warheads. The enabling technology was a 'fast capacitor bank' called Shiva Star that could store 10 million joules of energy and release it instantaneously. Officials anticipated firing bullets at 3,000km/sec in 1995 and 10,000km/sec - 3% of the speed of light - by the turn of the century. The tests absorbed little more than a few million dollars of annual funding (Jane's Defence Weekly 29 July 1998).


Full article @ Janes:

www.janes.com...

[edit on 13-11-2005 by warpboost]



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