H. P. Lovecraft: Master of Horror Stories, Or Conspiracy Historian?

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posted on Jan, 17 2008 @ 04:53 PM
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No kidding, Cloverfield man was involved with the silent CoC?
Astounding!

Of course thats still not a "major motion picture".

Google some images for cloverfield.
This thing comes right out of a Lovecraftian nightmare.

Awesome teasing

Oooh aaah, there was another one that came out two days ago
Asylum films Monster

Much less hype, much the same thing, and much more Cthulhu!
Or maybe a Dhole, ShuddM'el?

[edit on 17-1-2008 by Legalizer]




posted on Jan, 18 2008 @ 11:52 PM
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I believe that H.P. Lovecraft was both a master Horror writer and a Conspiracy Historian. Many of his stories carry little examples of conspiracy history. One such story is 'The Rats In The Wall'. He mentions something called 'The Exham Priory.' In the story, there are references to a building that used to hold The Exham Priory as having been destroyed many, many years before, and how the main character was 'restoring' it to it's previous splendor. He mentions in the story that the origional members of the Exham Priory had been Crusaders and important people before being branded as out casts and evil incarnate. Furthermore, when mentioning the part about restoring the building, it is mentioned that the Latin words DIV OPS MAGNA MAT were found carved in what remained of the origional foundation, which, in the story, means 'cursed of God in 1307', which is a reference to a real life incident in which the origional Knights Templers were branded as heretics and had most, if not all of their wealth and power stripped from them. Many members of the Knights Templer were also ostracized and many were tortured and killed for being Satanists and devil worshippers. That is why I believe that he is both a master horror writer AND a conspiracy historian.



posted on Aug, 13 2008 @ 01:26 PM
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LOL, I was searching for the thread with my terror-tale "Cicada Nexus" when I found there's a writer-member named Cicada posting in a Lovecraft thread. That's just bizarre out to the 3rd magnitude.



posted on Feb, 6 2009 @ 02:59 PM
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in innsmouth, the "hybrids" do occupy positions of influence and power, they own much of the town, and are wealthy enough to sport things like the misshapen tiara that sends the protagonist into spirals of horror. is a frog being a reptilian being? are splitting hairs here? (scales?)(Oannes?)

there are many points of possible tangency between lovecrafts work and our mutual hobby (the search for whats really going on)

lovecraft warns that finding out whats really going on might cost you your sanity... or your life... or both... curiously enough John Lear has said almost the exact same thing regarding some of the "UFO" stuff.

has anyone else heard the rumour that Sonia Greene (Mrs HPL for a short spell) was involved with Crowleys bunch? ive been trying to chase tha rumour down but i got nothing so far.

what other artists can we put into this category?

Have you seen david Lynch's '92 film Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me?

It seems to be a work in the same category, and seems to point to an other worldly or interdimensional group that feeds on the sexual torture of young women and operates out of the woods with an owl as their symbol... i know that all sounds familiar, but this was 1992.

Was lynch trying to tell us something or was his art potent enough to dent the imaginations of a whole generation? Did HPL "know something" or was his art potent enough to dent the imagination of multiple generations?



posted on Feb, 10 2009 @ 07:36 AM
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I'm still in the process of drawing parallels as I'm new relatively new to Lovecraft.

The trouble is with this kind of conjecture, can't the same be said of other writers like Stephen King? The Dark Tower series for example was written over 4 decades, a process consuming much of King's life. What were his influences/inspirations? Where did he carry out his research? etc... Can King be linked to a conspiracy at all?

To investigate further we must identify an attribute unique to Lovecraft. An attribute linking him directly to the types of hidden societies, cults and horrors he wrote about. Could that link be his Grandfather? Whipple Van Buren Phillips, the freemason?

To take this theory further, we must start with Ol' Whip Phillips.




[edit on 10/2/09 by thebox]



posted on Feb, 10 2009 @ 08:25 AM
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Originally posted by Anonymous ATS
in innsmouth, the "hybrids" do occupy positions of influence and power, they own much of the town, and are wealthy enough to sport things like the misshapen tiara that sends the protagonist into spirals of horror.


While the hybrids do control the town, that is all they control (which isn't saying much; the town has decayed to be point it is almost unviable). Innsmouth is isolated and shunned by the surrounding communities. Nor were the Innsmouth-folk making in effort to spread their influence.

It was not the hybrids wealth that brought them the gold tiara or other such trinkets. Any gold found in the town was a gift from the Deep Ones, given in exchange for sacrifices.


Originally posted by Anonymous ATS
is a frog being a reptilian being? are splitting hairs here? (scales?)(Oannes?)


While the over-all appearance is "frog-like," Lovecraft explicit they were fish-like beings and quite different than Oannes. From "The Shadow Over Innsmouth..."


I think their predominant color was a greyish-green, though they had white bellies. They were mostly shiny and slippery, but the ridges of their backs were scaly. Their forms vaguely suggested the anthropoid, while their heads were the heads of fish, with prodigious bulging eyes that never closed. At the sides of their necks were palpitating gills, and their long paws were webbed. They hopped irregularly, sometimes on two legs and sometimes on four. I was somehow glad that they had no more than four limbs. Their croaking, baying voices, clearly used for articulate speech, held all the dark shades of expression which their staring faces lacked ... They were the blasphemous fish-frogs of the nameless design - living and horrible.



posted on Feb, 10 2009 @ 09:13 AM
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I hope this isn't too off-topic.

A few years ago I found Simon's Necronomicon Spellbook and was interested to see his version of the Necronomicon itself.

I just knew exactly where to find it in the City. I knew which shop to go (not the one where I found the Spellbook) and I even knew which shelf in the basement of the shop, which wasn't famous for its book department.

I read one of the links here that says Simon's version is a hoax and that the connections he made to the Mesopotamian Gods were a bit stretched. All I can say is that the Spellbook worked very well for me and I'm grateful.



posted on Feb, 10 2009 @ 09:48 AM
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Originally posted by berenike
A few years ago I found Simon's Necronomicon Spellbook and...All I can say is that the Spellbook worked very well for me and I'm grateful.


What do you mean it worked well for you?

The Spellbook has nothing to do with Lovecraft, what-so-ever, outside of using the Necronomicon name.



posted on Feb, 10 2009 @ 09:50 AM
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Originally posted by berenike
I hope this isn't too off-topic.

A few years ago I found Simon's Necronomicon Spellbook and was interested to see his version of the Necronomicon itself.

I just knew exactly where to find it in the City. I knew which shop to go (not the one where I found the Spellbook) and I even knew which shelf in the basement of the shop, which wasn't famous for its book department.

I read one of the links here that says Simon's version is a hoax and that the connections he made to the Mesopotamian Gods were a bit stretched. All I can say is that the Spellbook worked very well for me and I'm grateful.


Thats interesting, considering Lovecraft admitted all of it was pure fiction, a device for his stories. Of course, there are others who deny this and claim the true necronomicon is housed in the Akashic records and Lovecraft was able to 'see' some of it through his dreams/nightmares.
Who knows?



posted on Feb, 10 2009 @ 10:43 AM
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Originally posted by Chiiru
Of course, there are others who deny this and claim the true necronomicon is housed in the Akashic records and Lovecraft was able to 'see' some of it through his dreams/nightmares.
Who knows?


They claim this on absolutely no basis, what-so-ever. Those who make such claims are engaging in nothing but a desperate stretch to convince themselves Lovecraft's stories may be real.

Lovecraft would have scoffed at any notion of an Akashic Record, and would have been disgusted to be associated with it.

[edit on 10-2-2009 by SaviorComplex]



posted on Feb, 10 2009 @ 10:48 AM
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Originally posted by SaviorComplex

They claim this on absolutely no basis, what-so-ever. Those who make such claims are engaging in nothing but a desperate stretch to convince themselves Lovecraft's stories may be real.

Lovecraft would have scoffed at any notion of an Akashic Record, and would have been disgusted to be associated with it.

[edit on 10-2-2009 by SaviorComplex]


yes I realize that. I was just stating it.

For one, why the hell would anyone want to think the 'great old ones' were real anyway? They're downright nasty nasty things.



posted on Feb, 10 2009 @ 11:43 AM
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reply to post by SaviorComplex
 


I used some of the spells in the book and got the help I requested.

I do realise they had nothing to do with Lovecraft himself, I thought it might be an interesting story for readers of this thread.

Possibly more for the way I found the Simon version of the Necronomicon than my use of the Spellbook.



posted on Feb, 10 2009 @ 05:40 PM
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Originally posted by berenike
I used some of the spells in the book and got the help I requested.

I do realise they had nothing to do with Lovecraft himself, I thought it might be an interesting story for readers of this thread.

Possibly more for the way I found the Simon version of the Necronomicon than my use of the Spellbook.


Righty'o then.

I am sure you could power Providence from the amount of energy generated by Lovecraft spinning in his grave.



posted on Feb, 10 2009 @ 06:02 PM
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Ouch - get back in the knife drawer, Miss Sharp.

You seem to know so much about how Lovecraft would feel about these matters - do you have a hotline to him?



posted on Feb, 10 2009 @ 06:32 PM
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I believe that H. P. Lovecraft is both a horror writer and a conspiracy historian. He has left many clues in all of his writings. 'The Case of Charles Dexter Ward' is certainly one that has many such hints and suggestions in it.



posted on Feb, 10 2009 @ 08:47 PM
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Originally posted by SaviorComplex

Originally posted by berenike
I used some of the spells in the book and got the help I requested.

I do realise they had nothing to do with Lovecraft himself, I thought it might be an interesting story for readers of this thread.

Possibly more for the way I found the Simon version of the Necronomicon than my use of the Spellbook.


Righty'o then.

I am sure you could power Providence from the amount of energy generated by Lovecraft spinning in his grave.


totally OT, but speaking of rolling, you had me rollin on the floor laughing, slick!



posted on Feb, 11 2009 @ 06:21 AM
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Originally posted by berenike
You seem to know so much about how Lovecraft would feel about these matters - do you have a hotline to him?


No, but I have done the next best thing, I've studied the man and his works for around 15 years now. He was a skeptic, an athiest and a materialist. He did not believe in God, an afterlife, or the supernatural in any way, and he especially did not believe (despite an oft-misinterpreted letter to August Derelth) that his stories were somehow rooted in the truth.

The comment was not direct at you, rather how he would be shocked and dismayed over some of the things his name and works have been associated with in the seven decades since his death.



posted on Feb, 11 2009 @ 06:24 AM
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Originally posted by Wally Conley
I believe that H. P. Lovecraft is both a horror writer and a conspiracy historian. He has left many clues in all of his writings. 'The Case of Charles Dexter Ward' is certainly one that has many such hints and suggestions in it.


Okay, I'll bite.

What hints and suggestions are there?



posted on Feb, 11 2009 @ 11:58 AM
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reply to post by SaviorComplex
 


Pardon my presumption, but when you posted your remarks immediately underneath a quote from me it did indeed look as if the ridicule was directed at me.

I have had an interest in Lovecraft for several years and always thought he had a fair old sense of humour. But I suppose one must possess such a trait in order to attribute it to someone else?

I know if I'd spent my time writing horror stories and they were still scaring the bejasus out of people generations later I'd be chuckling.

If anyone is interested, I will be posting my tribute to the genre in the Short Stories Forum later.



posted on Feb, 11 2009 @ 02:32 PM
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Originally posted by berenike
Pardon my presumption, but when you posted your remarks immediately underneath a quote from me it did indeed look as if the ridicule was directed at me.

I have had an interest in Lovecraft for several years and always thought he had a fair old sense of humour. But I suppose one must possess such a trait in order to attribute it to someone else?

I know if I'd spent my time writing horror stories and they were still scaring the bejasus out of people generations later I'd be chuckling.

If anyone is interested, I will be posting my tribute to the genre in the Short Stories Forum later.


Its unfortunate that only recently is he getting the credit he really deserves, and was not given this credit when he was still alive. I guess that is the fate of artists, isn't it?





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