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Wanna get back at the Oil companies?

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posted on Oct, 25 2005 @ 06:07 AM
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I have just stumbled upon a very interesting article in which a Londoner has made his own electricity and perhaps could help country-wide if more people were to get involved.

Generating interest in wind power

When Donnachadh McCarthy decided he wanted to generate his own electricity using a wind turbine, he almost fell at the first hurdle.

The planning application was initially refused after a neighbour objected - over what turned out to be an unnecessary concern.

"She said it was going to kill her cat," he said, "Which it wasn't.

"She also thought it was going to be 2.4m which is almost double the size."

Mr McCarthy reassured the neighbour that it would not harm any pets or wildlife and asked Southwark Council officers to change their minds.

"They said they were concerned that if they granted me permission they'd have to let everyone who wanted a turbine have one.

"But I said 'good, then we'll all be doing something to combat global warming'."





Please visit the link provided for the complete story.


Ok,

I would like to ask everyone to help in this. I find it a strong possibility that if enough of these home wind turbines were made and used it could save millions in utility bills, not only that but the energy that you generate that is not used by you could be sold back to the national grid.

I have always liked electricity and the many functions it provides and have often thought about making my very own wind turbine, I know it takes time and money but wouldn't it be cool if ATS had it's own power generation forum to swap ideas and designs on how to get energy cheaper or even free.


I also came up with the idea among others, of using the input water supply as a source of energy by placing a water turbine at the input point of the house.

~Peace
~




posted on Oct, 25 2005 @ 11:13 AM
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I also came up with the idea among others, of using the input water supply as a source of energy by placing a water turbine at the input point of the house.


Water pressure for residential lines usually isn't very high (usually 30 to 80 psi), so even a very efficient generator wouldn't net you much return for the resulting pressure drop, especially if your on the low end of that pressure range.



posted on Oct, 25 2005 @ 11:59 AM
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I'd rather use a geothermal heat sink and steam turbine system. Pay for the initial cost of building it and then free energy.



posted on Oct, 25 2005 @ 12:01 PM
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Unfortunately geothermal has allot of issues, the technology is expensive and finnicky. Micro-Hydro would be ideal for me IMO. I would have to buy land with a brisk moving river running through it though.

We can also make our grid much more efficient for a modest 40 billion(which will keep getting more expensive the longer we wait).

Here is an intersting article on making the N. American grid "Smart" and self-healing.

www.worldchanging.com...

[edit on 25-10-2005 by sardion2000]



posted on Oct, 25 2005 @ 12:02 PM
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Originally posted by JIMC5499
I'd rather use a geothermal heat sink and steam turbine system. Pay for the initial cost of building it and then free energy.


Definately the way to go. The U.S. Army reserves uses the heat sinks at some bases for energy conservation on their HVAC systems.



posted on Oct, 25 2005 @ 12:04 PM
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Also breakthroughs like this help


www.worldchanging.com...



posted on Oct, 25 2005 @ 01:07 PM
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Originally posted by yadboy

I also came up with the idea among others, of using the input water supply as a source of energy by placing a water turbine at the input point of the house.


Water pressure for residential lines usually isn't very high (usually 30 to 80 psi), so even a very efficient generator wouldn't net you much return for the resulting pressure drop, especially if your on the low end of that pressure range.


Would it not be possible to use some sort large capacity water tank then run the turbine from underneath it??



posted on Oct, 25 2005 @ 01:40 PM
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Originally posted by Hunting Veritas

Originally posted by yadboy

I also came up with the idea among others, of using the input water supply as a source of energy by placing a water turbine at the input point of the house.


Water pressure for residential lines usually isn't very high (usually 30 to 80 psi), so even a very efficient generator wouldn't net you much return for the resulting pressure drop, especially if your on the low end of that pressure range.


Would it not be possible to use some sort large capacity water tank then run the turbine from underneath it??


On a very large scale maybe, but the actual pressure gets you nothing. You need an active flow to turn the turbine. That means you would need a large head (very tall or elevated tank) and a way to recirculate the water to the tank (loss of energy). That's why this type of power generation is typically used with a moving body of water.



posted on Oct, 25 2005 @ 01:53 PM
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So how long until Bush makes it illegal to have WIndmills/Solar Panels/any other option? SOrry but in America if to many people start building those the Republicans will ban them. Just imagine if the oil companies only made 10 billion a quarter instead of 12.7 billion a quarter? That would cut down in the bribes, which would just make the Republicans madder.



posted on Oct, 25 2005 @ 05:15 PM
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Originally posted by Full Metal
So how long until Bush makes it illegal to have WIndmills/Solar Panels/any other option? SOrry but in America if to many people start building those the Republicans will ban them. Just imagine if the oil companies only made 10 billion a quarter instead of 12.7 billion a quarter? That would cut down in the bribes, which would just make the Republicans madder.


That was one of the reasons why posted this article.


"They said they were concerned that if they granted me permission they'd have to let everyone who wanted a turbine have one.


Imagine that.


Seriously though, I have not actually undertaken how to actually build a wind turbine, would it be difficult?

Even though the power output of this equipment is not an awful lot it would still help to ease CO2 emissions and lighter utility bills


~Peace
~



posted on Oct, 25 2005 @ 11:44 PM
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Not all alternate sources will work equally well everywhere on the planet. Solar cells, for instance, are much better here in Dallas, Texas than they are in Seattle, Washington. In order to have an effective alternative, you have to educate people and the alternative has to be doable in their area, save money, and be fairly low tech to implement.

For instance... I have an electric scooter (Schwinn) that I ride around that I just bought. It's $200 -- but some of my university coworkers who live near campus are now looking at buying that (rather than a car) for short trips around town. I pointed out that the cost of the bike was the cost of 5 tanks of gas. It's not quite as fast for most things, but it's economical for short errands.

(the fact that I'm a middle aged woman and ride it also has an impact... because now the bike isn't seen as "something for youngsters" since they see me buzzing around on it.)

The way to get new technology in is to find better solutions for your area and start being the tech leader. Talk to folks about it; make presentations.

That's one of my jobs as a volunteer at the local science museum -- I ride their Segway around (you just KNOW they had to beat me over the head to get me to ride it!
) and talk to folks about energy and alternate transportation and gyroscopes and traveling up to 30 miles on 35 cents' worth of electricity from your house. Very few can afford the Segway, but it gets them thinking about other sources in a positive manner.



posted on Oct, 26 2005 @ 04:32 PM
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Originally posted by Byrd
Not all alternate sources will work equally well everywhere on the planet. Solar cells, for instance, are much better here in Dallas, Texas than they are in Seattle, Washington. In order to have an effective alternative, you have to educate people and the alternative has to be doable in their area, save money, and be fairly low tech to implement.


So mankind needs a way of generating the power. Whatever the weather and cheaply, right?

An example of a free energy generator. Imagine a platform upon four 4 springs. The platform has 4 rows of teeth rolling against 4 cogs that connect to an electro-magnetic generator. Place a heavy load upon the platform. When the platform goes as low as it can, raise the heavy load and create some more free energy, due to the springs pushing the platform back up. Hey presto free energy in all weather


Dunno if it would work though?


Is that low tech enough too?


For instance... I have an electric scooter (Schwinn) that I ride around that I just bought. It's $200 -- but some of my university coworkers who live near campus are now looking at buying that (rather than a car) for short trips around town. I pointed out that the cost of the bike was the cost of 5 tanks of gas. It's not quite as fast for most things, but it's economical for short errands.

(the fact that I'm a middle aged woman and ride it also has an impact... because now the bike isn't seen as "something for youngsters" since they see me buzzing around on it.)


Like this one,



They look pretty nifty. 15mph, its a real beast then.


sorry, back to subject.


The way to get new technology in is to find better solutions for your area and start being the tech leader. Talk to folks about it; make presentations.


Great idea!


That's one of my jobs as a volunteer at the local science museum -- I ride their Segway around (you just KNOW they had to beat me over the head to get me to ride it!
) and talk to folks about energy and alternate transportation and gyroscopes and traveling up to 30 miles on 35 cents' worth of electricity from your house. Very few can afford the Segway, but it gets them thinking about other sources in a positive manner.


cool!!! I'd love to try one those things. Though I think they are expensive. I would stick with the scooter, alot cheaper and a little faster


bashes self over head for going off subject again :shk:

~Peace
~



posted on Oct, 26 2005 @ 08:43 PM
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Forgive me because I'm no expert on this subject whatsoever. But you can't just go and install a wind turbine generator anywhere, correct? You'd have to be in an area with sufficient wind in order to get anykind of electricity from it, right?

I live in southern New Jersey, USA. I can't say that we get all that much wind here in general. So like Byrd was saying, different kinds of "alternative energy" generators are suitable for different areas. How do you find out if your property gets enough wind for a wind turbine? Or enough sun for solar power? Or if your stream has a strong enough current for hydro power? etc, etc.



posted on Oct, 26 2005 @ 09:21 PM
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[So mankind needs a way of generating the power. Whatever the weather and cheaply, right?

An example of a free energy generator. Imagine a platform upon four 4 springs. The platform has 4 rows of teeth rolling against 4 cogs that connect to an electro-magnetic generator. Place a heavy load upon the platform. When the platform goes as low as it can, raise the heavy load and create some more free energy, due to the springs pushing the platform back up. Hey presto free energy in all weather


Dunno if it would work though?




You must remember that energy can neither be created nor destroyed, only transformed. How would the load be re-lifted?

There is no Free Energy. But, there is cheaper, cleaner and all around better sources. We only need to start making short-term sacrifices and change to way we think about electricity.



posted on Oct, 27 2005 @ 04:00 AM
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Originally posted by thejunk
You must remember that energy can neither be created nor destroyed, only transformed. How would the load be re-lifted?


Good question but I was only using it as an example but i'll try and answer anyways.


I'm being theoretical here but perhaps people using a series of pullies and ropes, bit old fasioned I know
. Me personally, I would probably use some sort of water system that empties and fills up by itself not to forget there are springs under the platform that raises it when the heavy load is lifted.


There is no Free Energy. But, there is cheaper, cleaner and all around better sources. We only need to start making short-term sacrifices and change to way we think about electricity.


Which is exactly what I'm doing and trying to persuade others.


~Peace
~


apc

posted on Oct, 27 2005 @ 08:18 PM
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There's always the old standby on solving two problems at once... energy and obesity: power generating exercise bikes!

I built one a long time ago... haven't gotten around to another, yet. I intend on building one in not too terribly long.

Until then I use the old favorite to take a few notches out of my power usage belt... solar panels. I charge up some car batteries during the day, and run an inverter off of them at night. Usually just to power my computer and monitor, so about 490watts saved.

As for saving gas... scooter baby! Picked myself up a 2005 Yamaha Zuma... I look like a total nerd, but what can I say... I am a nerd! A nerd gettin' 80 MPG!
> Unfortunately with winter coming I'm able to ride it less and less, and definitely not when it starts icing and snowing. So back to my 16MPG truck I go.



[edit on 27-10-2005 by apc]



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