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SCI/TECH: Schizophrenia Linked to Genetic Mutation

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posted on Oct, 24 2005 @ 08:49 PM
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Scientists have discovered a gene mutation that leads to schizophrenia in one-third of the persons with the mutation. The mutation occurs in one copy of the 22nd chromosomes. Experts hope that this finding will lead to a better understanding of schizophrenia and better treatments for this extremely debilitating illness.
 



www.forbes.com
Heredity seems to play a major role in schizophrenia, since the disease runs in families, and now new research sheds light on exactly how a genetic mutation disrupts the brain and makes people develop the condition.

The findings could eventually result in better drugs for schizophrenia, which is difficult to treat. For now, however, they're helping scientists understand the development of the disease, said Dr. Doron Gothelf, a child psychiatrist at Stanford University and co-author of a study in the Oct. 23 online issue of Nature Neuroscience.

Schizophrenics -- an estimated 1 percent of the population -- have trouble comprehending reality and are often prone to hallucinations and delusions. Some schizophrenics have memory and thinking problems, too.

"It's a disorder of thought," explained Wendy R. Kates, an associate professor of psychiatry at the State University of New York Upstate Medical University. "People hear voices that aren't necessarily there, and they experience delusions."




Please visit the link provided for the complete story.


It is impossible to underestimate the value of this finding. This is the first time in my understanding that there has ever been a demonstrable biological marker for schizophrenia. For decades, schizophrenia was considered a "functional" disorder rather than an "organic" disorder like the dementias. There was simply no lesion or other observable abnormality that could be said to cause the disorder. Indeed, until this finding, no one knew if schizophrenia was actually one disease or many diseases with similar symptoms. Just about the only thing that was certain was that there was a genetic component to the disease. If my understanding of the article is correct, this at least points to multiple causes for the constellation of symptoms we know as schizophrenia.

Not only is schizophrenia a terrible disease, but the treatments for it have very disturbing side effects, which often lead stricken individuals to stop taking their medications because their psychosis has abated, but the extra-pyramidal effects are too troublesome and embarrassing. New treatments may still be too far off to benefit everyone who suffers, but at least there is hope that someday there may be more effective and less problematic treatments and, perhaps for some, a cure.

Related News Links:
www.news-medical.net
www.schizophrenia.com
www.mentalhealth.com
en.wikipedia.org

[edit on 2005/10/24 by GradyPhilpott]




posted on Oct, 24 2005 @ 11:57 PM
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I absolutely don't believe schizophrenia is a disease. Get over yourselves people. You think you're 'normal', but your definition of normal is an illusion and so is everything else in this world. I believe schizophrenics are people who are able to access different frequencies like psychics and therefore react to what others can't see. They are like cats in a room who react to 'open air' when in reality it's not open air but things that we cannot see. Humans can only see less than 1% of known identifiable matter in the universe. Are we going to be so arrogant as to think schizophrenics are crazy? Nobody is crazy in my opinion, because everything is possible.



posted on Oct, 25 2005 @ 12:16 AM
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Just like that one lady who was schizophrenic...whatver. threw her kids into the water cause she was hearing voices in her head.

Talk about an X-File.



posted on Oct, 25 2005 @ 12:36 AM
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I absolutely don't believe schizophrenia is a disease. Get over yourselves people. You think you're 'normal', but your definition of normal is an illusion and so is everything else in this world. I believe schizophrenics are people who are able to access different frequencies like psychics and therefore react to what others can't see. They are like cats in a room who react to 'open air' when in reality it's not open air but things that we cannot see. Humans can only see less than 1% of known identifiable matter in the universe. Are we going to be so arrogant as to think schizophrenics are crazy? Nobody is crazy in my opinion, because everything is possible.


While I can understand and agree with you to some extent, I think a problem, although you might not call it that, is the possibility that schizophrenics could cause harm to others. Since they do have problems when it comes to perceiving reality they might inadvertently hurt someone or even themselves.



posted on Oct, 25 2005 @ 12:53 AM
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Originally posted by Solidus Snake
I absolutely don't believe schizophrenia is a disease.


The debate over what to call mental illnesses and the like has raged for a very long time and if by disease you mean something caused by an infectious agent, then you would be right to call my hand on that, but Merriam-Webster defines disease as:


a condition of the living animal or plant body or of one of its parts that impairs normal functioning

www.m-w.com...


There really is nothing that describes schizophrenia better than "a condition...that impairs normal functioning."

Your first misunderstanding is the definition of normal. What is normal is that which falls within the norm and that is defined by a population, not by some arbitrary definition. Those who present with the symptoms we designate as schizophrenia make up about !% of the population. That fact, in itself, makes them abnormal. Persons with IQ scores above the first standard deviation above the mean are not normal either.

Schizophrenia is defined as much by disruptions of functioning as it is by hallucinations and delusions. The following and the associated link should help to clarify what schizophrenia is and is not:




Symptoms of Schizophrenia

Schizophrenia is characterized by profound disruption in cognition and emotion, affecting the most fundamental human attributes: language, thought, perception, affect, and sense of self. The array of symptoms, while wide ranging, frequently includes psychotic manifestations, such as hearing internal voices or experiencing other sensations not connected to an obvious source (hallucinations) and assigning unusual significance or meaning to normal events or holding fixed false personal beliefs (delusions). No single symptom is definitive for diagnosis; rather, the diagnosis encompasses a pattern of signs and symptoms, in conjunction with impaired occupational or social functioning (Source: DSM-IV -available for purchase on Amazon.com Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders DSM-IV-TR).

Symptoms are typically divided into positive and negative symptoms because of their impact on diagnosis and treatment. Positive symptoms are those that appear to reflect an excess or distortion of normal functions. The diagnosis of schizophrenia, according to DSM-IV, requires at least 1-month duration of two or more positive symptoms, unless hallucinations or delusions are especially bizarre, in which case one alone suffices for diagnosis. Negative symptoms are those that appear to reflect a diminution or loss of normal functions. These often persist in the lives of people with schizophrenia during periods of low (or absent) positive symptoms. Negative symptoms are difficult to evaluate because they are not as grossly abnormal as positives ones and may be caused by a variety of other factors as well (e.g., as an adaptation to a persecutory delusion). However, advancements in diagnostic assessment tools are being made.

Diagnosis is complicated by early treatment of schizophrenia’s positive symptoms. Antipsychotic medications, particularly the traditional ones, often produce side effects that closely resemble the negative symptoms of affective flattening and avolition. In addition, other negative symptoms are sometimes present in schizophrenia but not often enough to satisfy diagnostic criteria (DSM-IV): loss of usual interests or pleasures (anhedonia); disturbances of sleep and eating; dysphoric mood (depressed, anxious, irritable, or angry mood); and difficulty concentrating or focusing attention.

Currently, discussion is ongoing within the field regarding the need for a third category of symptoms for diagnosis: disorganized symptoms. Disorganized symptoms include thought disorder, confusion, disorientation, and memory problems. While they are listed by DSM-IV as common in schizophrenia—especially during exacerbations of positive or negative symptoms (DSM-IV)—they do not yet constitute a formal new category of symptoms. Some researchers think that a new category is not warranted because disorganized symptoms may instead reflect an underlying dysfunction common to several psychotic disorders, rather than being unique to schizophrenia.

www.schizophrenia.com...
www.schizophrenia.com...




[edit on 2005/10/25 by GradyPhilpott]



posted on Oct, 26 2005 @ 01:54 AM
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Also how do we know that (have any of you seen that new show, Threshold?) they aren't aliens. On this show these aliens like posess all these humans and make them do things they don't want to do and they like start getting emotionally random and this one girl like went to the store and bought a years worth of candy.

Schizophrenia could be a cover-up for some alien virus. I mean put it together, voices inside head, not feeling 'themselves' c'mon their possed by something

You choose what posseses them:

A: The devil

B: Aliens

C: Government project




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