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The names of the planes

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posted on Feb, 17 2006 @ 11:30 PM
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Actually not quite right Ultima...

The Original Phantom was the McDonnell FD-1 (redesignated FH-1) Phantom. Which was this......



This was a completely different aircraft to the McDonnell F4H / F-4 Phantom II. So all versions of the F-4 are actually Phantom II




posted on Feb, 18 2006 @ 12:36 AM
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Well Welcome to aircraft board Wombat:

In terms of you said, then why did B-1B not be called Lancer II ? Everyone knew that Republic P-43 has been called "Lancer" before.

_______
Waynos:
I still remember you taught me how to use "in terms of" and "according to" in different way, is the way I used here correct?



posted on Feb, 18 2006 @ 05:05 AM
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Maybe because Republic and Rockwell are not related. Both 'Phantoms' were produced by McDonnell. Also, the Eurofighter is not the Typhoon II, yet Hawker, who produced the original Typhoon in WW2) IS historically part of BAE Systems so it doesn't always follow.



posted on Feb, 18 2006 @ 07:59 AM
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Originally posted by The Winged Wombat
Actually not quite right Ultima...

The Original Phantom was the McDonnell FD-1 (redesignated FH-1) Phantom. Which was this......



This was a completely different aircraft to the McDonnell F4H / F-4 Phantom II. So all versions of the F-4 are actually Phantom II


Yes, i was just stating that the Wild Weasel was a version of the Phantom II. Not a Phantom II itself.

Example:
F-4E is a Phantom II
F-4C is a Phantom II
F-4D Wild Weasel is a Phantom II

I was a Crew Chief on the RF-4C Phantom II




[edit on 18-2-2006 by ULTIMA1]

[edit on 18-2-2006 by ULTIMA1]



posted on Feb, 18 2006 @ 12:17 PM
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Is this the only plane whose name sounds more like a choice of professional career?

The Aviation Traders Accountant




[edit on 18-2-2006 by waynos]



posted on Feb, 18 2006 @ 01:49 PM
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anyone know if there is a plane with the name "WidowMaker"???? i think it would be pretty cool however probably only feared by the male pilots



posted on Feb, 18 2006 @ 05:18 PM
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Not in any official sence but names such as 'widow maker and flying coffin have been applied to a few types as nicknames by their crews and/or adversaries. Whispering Death was also a good one



posted on Feb, 18 2006 @ 05:29 PM
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Originally posted by Neutrino
anyone know if there is a plane with the name "WidowMaker"???? i think it would be pretty cool however probably only feared by the male pilots


The b-26 earned this nick name
as well as a lot more when training on the type began in 1942 others included "One-Way Ticket", "Martin Murderer", and my favourite "one a day in to tampa bay" due to the location of the training base in Florida.


* alot of the pilots selected for training had no experiance of twin engined aircraft

[edit on 18-2-2006 by buckaroo]



posted on Feb, 19 2006 @ 05:29 PM
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I thought the Martin's problem was its high (er than usual) landing speed.

Widowmaker seems to have been the most popular nickname for the Starfighters in West German service.

I liked the early jet-fighter names.

Arado Blitz (which we all know means lightning).

Gloster Meteor

P 80 Shooting Star (couldn't really call it the meteorite, could we?!?:lol


And patriotism aside I'm just not sure why Canberra was chosen as the name for the first jet bomber...



posted on Feb, 19 2006 @ 05:47 PM
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Thats because it was British policy that bombers and transports were named after cities in the Commonwealth. So you didn't just get the obvious British ones like the Avro Lancaster and Handley Page Halifax etc but you also got overseas cities 'honoured' by having an RAF type carry their name such as the Bristol Bombay, Handley Page Hyderabad and, of course, English Electric Canberra.


The last plane to be named under this policy was the 1966 Hawker Siddeley Andover, militarised version of the HS 748.

An exception to this rule that catches people out is the Vickers Wellington, which is not named after the NZ capaital, but after the Duke of Wellington, following on as it did from the Vickers Wellesley (Wellesley was the dukes family name, ie Arthur Wellesly).



posted on Feb, 19 2006 @ 05:58 PM
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Vickers Wildebeest, Wellesley, Wellington

Bristol Blenheim, Beaufort, Beaufighter

Hawker Hart, Hurricane, Hunter (Demon, Tempest, Typhoon)

I like Blackburn, far more obscure, Skua, Roc (I actually had to look them up to find out what they were.) But they went back to old (British) habits with the Buccaneer.

As nicknames go, who can go passed the "Stringbag"? A bi-plane torpedo bomber whose greatest moment was at Taranto (but which will only ever be remembered for jamming the Bismark's rudder.)



posted on Feb, 19 2006 @ 06:05 PM
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Originally posted by HowlrunnerIV
I thought the Martin's problem was its high (er than usual) landing speed.


The main problem far as im can tell initially was a increase in weight in the developement which led to higher and higher wing loading resulting in higher landing and stall speeds....... your right


The plane was looked at after the spate of training accidents and was going to be cancelled 3 or 4 times(not sure) but it was concluded that it was mainly down to inexperiance and overloading. obviously tweaks were made in subsequent models also and it went on to have one of the lower attrition rates in the european theatre.

On the naming of the Canbera it was probably the continuation of the policy by the RAF to name its planes after cities in the Empire/commonwealth Halifax,Wellington,Lancaster,Lincoln etc Canbera fits in nicely with those ,then of course they went to the V bombers.

* as by the time i finished typng this you now already know, im too slow


I didn't know about the wellington though

[edit on 19-2-2006 by buckaroo]



posted on Feb, 19 2006 @ 06:40 PM
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It might also be worth mentioning here that the Vickers 'W' bombers were so named (all with names beginning with W) to denote Barnes Wallis' geodetic construction method which allowed them to take more damage than normally constructed aircraft, apart from the Wellesley and Wellington this also includes the Warwick and Windsor.

Also the V bombers, mentioned by Buckaroo, were so named because the wing leading edges formed a V shape This is nothing special now, but these were the first swept wing strategic bombers to be developed for the RAF (little did anyone know that they would be the only ones) so it was felt to be noteworthy.

[edit on 19-2-2006 by waynos]



posted on Feb, 19 2006 @ 10:04 PM
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on the subject of my favourite plane , Ever been to newark air museum waynos?

If not I highly recomend it if not for the Canberas,shackleton,meteors etc then for this beautiful old bird

Avro Vulcan B.2 XM594 i love the place got some better pictures that i took myself ,(I didn't take this one)on another computer,they've got a blue steel missile too!

www.bbc.tv...

Above gives a 360 look at the place.

And the best name has to be "the aluminium death tube" ascribed to the star fighter



posted on Feb, 20 2006 @ 12:44 AM
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Waynos,

>>
But KPI, wouldn't these be crew allocated nicknames rather than genuine type names? Especially in the case of the MiG 25?
>>

True enough but under the 'better the user community than some git in Washington' category:

(Aard)Vark
(Wart)Hog
Viper
Jug
Pony
Hawg (F4U)
Albino/Rodan
Beagle/Mudhen
Cockroach/Black Jet
Turkey
Bug
Rhino (The F-4, NOT the F/A-18E/F!)
Vigi/Vidge
Spad
Tweet/Super Tweet
Mosquito (T-38)

I'm sure there are others but the point is that while some are 'personal' as a function of affection or disgust, many go on to become official beyond the DOD/Manufacturer's designation.

I for one find 'Flanker' to be both meaningless and accountantlike nomenclature for while the Su-27 is indeed one of the world's longest ranging fighters, it's flying-SAM-site weapons load and lack of LO/supercruise doesn't suggest the need or ability to 'out flank' something so much as motor right over it.

OTOH, Crane is a /cool/ name because cranes can indeed fight and their hunting method is a long downwards stabbing _precise_ motion which is both graceful and perhaps indicative of the Su-27 having the first really capable LDSD and longrange BVR 'fighter' radar weapons system capability in the Soviet lineup. It also is cross-associative of the Crane fighting style in martial arts which everybody knows of if not exactly /how/ it works from the movies.

Now that we know them better, it would be interesting to see magazines start, at least interchangeably, to use 'Su-27 Crane' with 'Flanker' to familiarize the public with the fact that various other states are not quite the unknowable marching robots the ASCC system would have them be but have their own 'style' as it were. I doubt if it would catch on but it might.

>>
I know that in a lot of cases the crews nicknames for their aircraft are much more apt and entertaining than the official ones, 'Harmonious Dragmaster' is one of my favourites which was allocated to the Gloster Javelin, and when you look at it you can see why, and also why Gloster never produced another plane after it.
>>

Indeed. I always liked the large semi-delta wing form (as compared to the 'bent boomerang' of the Lightning for instance). Reminds for some reason of the Cutlass. The T-Tail however... I don't really like that, even on the 'Zipper'.

Of course you then get into problems with 'which country nick do you use?'. And is it for significant variations of function or equipment standard or only for local-to-theater national reference discriminatory use?

I like the Indian name 'Baaz' over the semi-official 'Striji' or Swift for the MiG-29. But Baaz is roughly the same name (Hawk or Falcon as I recall) employed by the IDFAF for the F-15A/B. While Buzzard or Akef is the F-15C variant designator and Ra'am or 'Thunder' is that employed for the F-15I.

Thunder(bolt) I dig over 'Strike Eagle', simply because the usage in our language is pretty strained (An animate is not really considered the possessive of an action form unless that is /all/ that it does and even then it is generally assumed).

Buzzard however connotes a bird which feeds on the kills of others rather than making it's own. So there is a danger in allowing oneself to be subject to other's nicks, even when -your- equipment in /their/ use.


KPl.


LINK-
'The Soviet Union Did Not Assign Official Nicknames...'
en.wikipedia.org...



posted on Feb, 20 2006 @ 04:22 AM
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KPI, you couldn't identify some of those nicknames for me could you as about half those in the list are unfamiliar to me?



posted on Feb, 20 2006 @ 08:58 AM
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Waynos,

Albino/Rodan
Any F-15 with light grey air superiority camo but most typically the A->D. Also the giant Japanese pteranodon type monster of movie fame in reference to the types huge wingspan and 'dated approach' relative to the Electric Jet (or the F-15E). Since Albino's are often attributed as being 'more than skin deep' on the weird scale and no fighter jock likes to have his ride called an antique...

Beagle/Mudhen
The F-15E. Bomber Eagle as an oft-overweight dog with 'sad sad eyes'. Alternately, a jet so compromised in it's initial role by it's air to mud expanded mission that it is no longer a hunter but a target. Fighter Pilots MUST look cool doing everything so going down into the mud to play female chicken is about as low as you can go on the don't-do-that scale. Neither one particuarly popular among the folks at Seymour, Elmendorf or Lakenheath but a guaranteed free beer in a Viper bar.

Cockroach/Black Jet
F-117. Presumably because they only come out at night. I've also heard it called the 'Picasso' I presume in reference to it's cubist planed shapes. A less aerodynamic airframe is hard to envision.

Turkey
F-14. The aircraft doesn't have really good directional and AOA/sink control on approach, especially without good DLC. So it tends to wobble and heel on it's spread wings 'tail all a-flapping', just like a wild turkey.

Bug
USAF speak for the F-18. Since a Hornet is fierce insect but a bug is something you /try/ to identify, off the bottom of your shoe or front of your windshield.

Vigi/Vidge
A-5 Vigilante.

Spad
A-1 Skyraider. A phoneticization of Single Place Attack Douglas or some such but also in reference to the types very low speeds. Also Able Dog (AD-1 thru 6) among a host of others.

Tweet/Super Tweet
T-37 because of it's high pitched engines and 'big head, small body' proportions, sufficient as to be likened unto Sylvester's nemesis. I believe the A-37 is called the 'Killer Tweet'.


KPl.


LINK-
www.csd.uwo.ca...



posted on Feb, 20 2006 @ 09:07 AM
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Thanks, much appreciated



posted on Feb, 20 2006 @ 05:28 PM
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Originally posted by ch1466
Spad
A-1 Skyraider. A phoneticization of Single Place Attack Douglas or some such but also in reference to the types very low speeds. Also Able Dog (AD-1 thru 6) among a host of others.


So, not a reference to the French plane that Eddie Rickenbacker made such good use of...

Always did like the Skyraider, not because I knew it to be a good plane, just because I'd heard that grunts loved its pilots 'cause they got down where the $hit was happening to the grunts.

Replaced by Heinemann's Hot-rod...which the Argie's managed to make look bad by losing so many of them to SHAR 1s.

And on the subject of Douglas...Devestator, such a good name, but partnered with the Dauntless? Oh, no, everybody run, it's the plane that can't be daunted!



posted on Feb, 20 2006 @ 07:08 PM
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I think you might be being a little harsh on the Argies and their hot-rods. I seem to recall that most of the A-4 losses by the Argies were by flak and Seacat, as they pressed home their attacks at ever lower heights - in fact in some cases so low that the bombs did not have time to set the fuses - quite a number of cases of bombs being lodged in ships that had not exploded due to the fact that they were dropped too low.

In turn, it was the Mirage derivatives that were flying top cover and fell foul of the Harriers.

Always remember that the Argies were at a tactical disadvantage, in that their aircraft were always operating at maximum range, and had not fuel to manoeuvre or engage in air to air combat.

So considering these facts, and the damage inflicted on the British ships, I think the A-4 and their Argie pilots didn't come out of the conflict smelling too badly at all.

Had the runway at Stanley been long enough to support A-4 and Mirage operations, it may well have been an entirely different matter. The British carriers would have had to be further from the islands to remain outside the range of the Super Etendards, and it would have been the Harrier that was operating at maximum range. Note that once the Brits re-established themselves, the first thing they did was lengthen the Stanley runway. For the same reasons, that's why it was so important to keep the Argentine carrier from establishing itself between the Argentine mainland and the islands.

[edit on 20/2/06 by The Winged Wombat]




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