It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

How can you separate them...?

page: 1
0
<<   2 >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Oct, 15 2005 @ 05:26 AM
link   
Well, hello to all...

As you know the first step you have to take when you are separating for instance an F-14 from an F-15 is to look at the base shapes. Wing formations, nose forms, engines outlook and the tailwings form. After looking at pictures time after time you are starting to see the differences between the different planes. The F-16 and the J-3 are suddenly totally differnet from what they were a time ago.

But the next step is to learn how to separate an F/A-18 A from a C or an
F-16 A from and F-16 C. I'am now in this point. I know how to separate planes from eachother, but not models. Please help me, I would be in gratitude forever.

Please notice that I have some pictures below!

F/A-18 "Hornet"

F/A-18_1

F/A-18_2

F/A-18_3

F-16 "Fighting Falcon"

F-16_1

F-16_2

F-16_3



[edit on 15-10-2005 by Figher Master FIN]




posted on Oct, 15 2005 @ 05:34 AM
link   
A lot of them, there's not really a way to tell the different models apart. The biggest way with like the F-15A and the C is to look at the tail number. The ACC tail numbers are the last two digits of the year it was made, then the plane number. Like for an A it would be AF 74-088 for a C it would be something like AF 80-175.

The A and C models of the F-15/16 are single seaters, while the B and D models are two seaters, so they have the longer canopy, with the seat in back.

The F-15E is a dark green, two seater, with laser designators and FLIR pods under the intakes.

The original F-16As had a clear canopy, while the C models had a gold colored canopy.

The F-18 A/C have rounded intakes, while the E/F have square intakes, a longer wing and fuselage.

That's the basic differences between models in a nutshell.



posted on Oct, 15 2005 @ 06:16 AM
link   
I too have a great difficulty in differentiating an F-16A from an F-16C (though I can tell the difference between a Lightning F.1, F.3 and F.6 quite easily)

Some more hints that you may find useful apart from those above is that the very early series F-18's had open slots that you could see right through along the inner edge of the LERX where it meets the fuselage and the early F-16 tailplane did not extend aft beyond the extreme edge of the fuselage fairings they are attached to, the reason that F-16 tails are now notched on the trailing edge of the tip is to prevent them scraping the ground on take off since they were extended aft.



posted on Oct, 15 2005 @ 06:32 AM
link   
Are you only looking at fighters, or at everything in general? Most of the bigger planes only have one or two models still flying, but just wondering if you're looking at everything, or just the smaller planes.



posted on Oct, 15 2005 @ 09:29 AM
link   

Originally posted by Zaphod58
Are you only looking at fighters, or at everything in general? Most of the bigger planes only have one or two models still flying, but just wondering if you're looking at everything, or just the smaller planes.


Well, personally I don't have any problems separating passangerplanes from eachother... Because in my eyes you can clearly see differences between the noses of airbus and boeings planes...

My real problem is the fighters... I can easily see the difference between a F/A-18 C and E... But what about the G model wich should come out soon... It looks exactly like the E model... I'd be greatful if somebody could post some pics were the diferences are clearly shown...



posted on Oct, 15 2005 @ 09:36 AM
link   
Well the G is just going to be an E/F with antiradar capabilities. Instead of being a strike platform, it's going to carry jamming pods and antiradar missiles. I haven't seen anything that shows any huge differences externally between the E/F and the G. If there are, you'll see bulges along the top of the wing root or something like that, for radar receivers/jammers. But they can put the same equipment under the wing on the hardpoints.



posted on Oct, 15 2005 @ 09:46 AM
link   
I think the G is externally identical to the F/A-18F, rather than the E, as it is a two seater but it should be identifiable as it will carry pods on the wingtips rather than missiles.

[edit on 15-10-2005 by waynos]



posted on Oct, 15 2005 @ 11:08 AM
link   
Of course not all the variations are visible from the outside of the aircraft, that said here is a list of differences...

F-16A:
A single seat - pretty obvious.

F-16B:
Dual seat tandem cockpit, longer bubble canopy to accomodate the extra seat.

The A & B saw the following upgrades:

Block 1 and Block 5 F-16s were manufactured through 1981 for USAF and for European air forces.

Block 10 aircraft were built through 1980. Differences are mainly internal and not noticeable to the casual observer.

Block 15 aircraft (approximately 3,600 Block 15's were made) Block 15 provided two hardpoints added to the chin of the inlet along with larger horizontal tails, which grew in area by about 30%.

F-16C:
A single seat also.

F-16D:
Dual seat tandem cockpit.

The C & D saw the following upgrades:

Block 25 provided night/precision ground-attack capabilities, as well as an improved radar, the Westinghouse (now Northrop-Grumman AN/APG-68).

Block 30/32 added two new engines -- Block 30 designates a General Electric F110-GE-100 engine, and Block 32 designates a Pratt & Whitney F100-PW-220 engine. Block 30/32 can carry the AGM-45 Shrike and the AGM-88A HARM, and like the Block 25, it can carry the AGM-65 Maverick.

Block 40/42 - F-16CG/DG - gained capabilities for navigation and precision attack in all weather conditions and at night with the LANTIRN pods and was armed with the GBU-10, GBU-12, GBU-24 Paveway laser-guided bombs and the GBU-15. Block 40/42 production began in 1988 and ran through 1995.

Block 50/52 Equipped with a Northrop Grumman APG-68 version 7 radar and a General Electric F110-GE-129 Increased Performance Engine, color multifunctional displays, a Modular Mission Computer, a Digital Terrain System, a color video camera and color triple-deck video recorder to record the pilot's head-up display view, and an upgraded DTU.

Block 50D/52D Wild Weasel F-16CJ (CJ means block 50) Has the ability ability to carry the AGM-88 HARM and the AN/ASQ-213 HARM Targeting System for SEAD.

Block 60 - This upgrade package consists of conformal fuel tanks for greater range, new cockpit displays, an internal sensor suite, a new mission computer and other advanced features including a new agile beam radar.


[edit on 15-10-2005 by intelgurl]



posted on Oct, 15 2005 @ 11:13 AM
link   

Originally posted by intelgurl
F-16A:
A single seat - pretty obvious.

F-16B:
Dual seat tandem cockpit, longer bubble canopy to accomodate the extra seat.

The A & B saw the following upgrades:

Block 1 and Block 5 F-16s were manufactured through 1981 for USAF and for European air forces.

Block 10 aircraft were built through 1980. Differences are mainly internal and not noticeable to the casual observer.

Block 15 aircraft (approximately 3,600 Block 15's were made) Block 15 provided two hardpoints added to the chin of the inlet along with larger horizontal tails, which grew in area by about 30%.

F-16C:
A single seat also.

F-16D:
Dual seat tandem cockpit.

The C & D saw the following upgrades:

Block 25 provided night/precision ground-attack capabilities, as well as an improved radar, the Westinghouse (now Northrop-Grumman AN/APG-68).

Block 30/32 added two new engines -- Block 30 designates a General Electric F110-GE-100 engine, and Block 32 designates a Pratt & Whitney F100-PW-220 engine. Block 30/32 can carry the AGM-45 Shrike and the AGM-88A HARM, and like the Block 25, it can carry the AGM-65 Maverick.

Block 40/42 - F-16CG/DG - gained capabilities for navigation and precision attack in all weather conditions and at night with the LANTIRN pods and was armed with the GBU-10, GBU-12, GBU-24 Paveway laser-guided bombs and the GBU-15. Block 40/42 production began in 1988 and ran through 1995.

Block 50/52 Equipped with a Northrop Grumman APG-68 version 7 radar and a General Electric F110-GE-129 Increased Performance Engine, color multifunctional displays, a Modular Mission Computer, a Digital Terrain System, a color video camera and color triple-deck video recorder to record the pilot's head-up display view, and an upgraded DTU.

Block 50D/52D Wild Weasel F-16CJ (CJ means block 50) Has the ability ability to carry the AGM-88 HARM and the AN/ASQ-213 HARM Targeting System for SEAD.

Block 60 - This upgrade package consists of conformal fuel tanks for greater range, new cockpit displays, an internal sensor suite, a new mission computer and other advanced features including a new agile beam radar.


Well, you never let us donwn intelgurl... But some points are still left a bit open... How can you see differences between the F/A-18...? Are the A and C models indentic...

BTW, i found an internet page about this block thing... F-16 "Blocks"



posted on Oct, 15 2005 @ 05:05 PM
link   
There are a lot of differences between them that you can't tell just by looking. Like the different engines. Externally they're identical. Or the ability to carry HARMs and Shrikes. Unless you see them loaded up for a mission, you can't tell if they're able to carry them or not. You can tell if it's an A or a C but not the block number. Not trying to take anything away from Intelgurl's post because as usual it's great and accurate information, just saying that you can't always tell the Block number from looking at the outside of the plane.

There's also the F-16ADF that I don't think was mentioned btw. That one has four small antenna on top and bottom of the nose that interogate IFFs, and a steerable spotlight for identifying planes at night.



posted on Oct, 16 2005 @ 02:31 AM
link   

Originally posted by Zaphod58
There are a lot of differences between them that you can't tell just by looking. Like the different engines. Externally they're identical. Or the ability to carry HARMs and Shrikes. Unless you see them loaded up for a mission, you can't tell if they're able to carry them or not. You can tell if it's an A or a C but not the block number. Not trying to take anything away from Intelgurl's post because as usual it's great and accurate information, just saying that you can't always tell the Block number from looking at the outside of the plane.

There's also the F-16ADF that I don't think was mentioned btw. That one has four small antenna on top and bottom of the nose that interogate IFFs, and a steerable spotlight for identifying planes at night.


Yeah I get your point... But if there aren't any weapons...?



posted on Oct, 16 2005 @ 02:33 AM
link   
It's almost impossible to tell, since externally they're incredibly similar. There are little differences, like the block that has the Lantirn and targetting pods under the intakes, and the different size of the tail, but it's VERY hard to tell the block numbers by looking at them.

That's just for different Block numbers though. The difference between models is easier to tell.

[edit on 10/16/2005 by Zaphod58]



posted on Oct, 17 2005 @ 01:04 PM
link   

Originally posted by Zaphod58
It's almost impossible to tell, since externally they're incredibly similar. There are little differences, like the block that has the Lantirn and targetting pods under the intakes, and the different size of the tail, but it's VERY hard to tell the block numbers by looking at them.

That's just for different Block numbers though. The difference between models is easier to tell.

[edit on 10/16/2005 by Zaphod58]


Well yes. I understand that. But if you as a (fighter) pilot suddenly see an enemy fighter. For instance an F/A-18, is it good enough if you report back tower "Enemy F/A-18 spotted" or don't you have to be more specific. "Enemy F/A-18 E spotted". Aren't the pilots trained to see the differences between defferent models. They have to have some parts different. The F/A-18 C costs about 28 million, the E model closer to 55 million. The outlines can't be exactly the same. What I'am looking for is something like this...


F/A-18 A/C


F/A-18 E

Understand...?


[edit on 17-10-2005 by Figher Master FIN]

[edit on 17-10-2005 by Figher Master FIN]



posted on Oct, 17 2005 @ 01:12 PM
link   
If you see an emeny F-18, you're going to get on the radio and yell "Bandit 12 oclock!" If you can identify it as an F-18, then that's plenty good enough. You couldn't care less if it's an A or an E. Just knowing that it's a Hornet is enough. The differences are so subtle that there is no way that you couid tell at any sort of distance. There's no way you could see a Hornet at 1/2 mile and say "Oh, it has square intakes! It's an E."



posted on Oct, 18 2005 @ 07:07 AM
link   

Originally posted by Zaphod58
If you see an emeny F-18, you're going to get on the radio and yell "Bandit 12 oclock!" If you can identify it as an F-18, then that's plenty good enough. You couldn't care less if it's an A or an E. Just knowing that it's a Hornet is enough. The differences are so subtle that there is no way that you couid tell at any sort of distance. There's no way you could see a Hornet at 1/2 mile and say "Oh, it has square intakes! It's an E."


Yeah I get your point. You are propably interested in keeping your plane alive than to know whether it's an A or an E... OK, but my point is... Is the only part(s) taht separate these planes from eachother are the cockpits, fuselage and the weaponry...?


F/A-18 A, C


F/A-18 E



posted on Oct, 18 2005 @ 07:12 AM
link   
Those are the only major distinguishing differences. There are subtle little things you can tell them apart by if you can see them parked on the ground, but those are things like tail number, year made etc. But from a distance the only differences are size for the F/A-18E/F (the wing and fuselage are longer, but you can only tell with an A/C next to them), the intakes (again for the Hornet) and weaponry.



posted on Oct, 18 2005 @ 12:59 PM
link   
Yeah, very true... But look at these scale pictures... If they are correct the E/F model is a lot bigger than the A/B/C/D models... So wouldn't that be a good way to separate them, to look at the size...?




posted on Oct, 18 2005 @ 01:12 PM
link   
You would only be able to judge the difference in size if both types were flying side by side and exactly the same distance away from you. How would you know if it was an F/A-18E flying with an -18C or just another -18C that was a bit closer to you?

The visual clue, as you will see from the picture you posted, is that the LERX of the E are broad and rounded whereas the earlier versions appear long and thin.

[edit on 18-10-2005 by waynos]



posted on Oct, 19 2005 @ 07:49 AM
link   

Originally posted by waynos
You would only be able to judge the difference in size if both types were flying side by side and exactly the same distance away from you. How would you know if it was an F/A-18E flying with an -18C or just another -18C that was a bit closer to you?

The visual clue, as you will see from the picture you posted, is that the LERX of the E are broad and rounded whereas the earlier versions appear long and thin.

[edit on 18-10-2005 by waynos]


Very true... But is there really no way to separate them...?



posted on Oct, 19 2005 @ 09:51 AM
link   
Its also looks like the wings where the fold is done for storage has a similar notched look to the phantom or arrow. The C/D versions have from the looks of it no notch.



new topics

top topics



 
0
<<   2 >>

log in

join