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SCI/TECH: U.S. May Lose Its Global Lead In Science

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posted on Oct, 14 2005 @ 06:24 PM
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The United States, long the global leader in science & technology may be losing that lead. A report released on October 12th by the National Academies paints an increasingly grim picture on the state of science education in the U.S. Their report also shows the declining investment trend in science research being conducted in the U.S. relative to other countries such as China and contrasts the relative amounts of scientific and technological efforts that may be pursued for the same cost. Urgent action is called for by the report.
 



www4.nationalacademies.org
Broad Federal Effort Urgently Needed to Create New, High-Quality Jobs for All Americans in the 21st Century

WASHINGTON -- The unmatched vitality of the United States' economy and science and technology enterprise has made this country a world leader for decades, allowing Americans to benefit from a high standard of living and national security. But in a world where advanced knowledge is widespread and low-cost labor is readily available, U.S. advantages in the marketplace and in science and technology have begun to erode. A comprehensive and coordinated federal effort is urgently needed to bolster U.S. competitiveness and pre-eminence in these areas so that the nation will consistently gain from the opportunities offered by rapid globalization, says a new report from the National Academies.

Given the United States' history of economic and scientific pre-eminence, it is easy to be complacent about these complex issues, the report says. Following are some indicators that illustrate why decisive action is needed now:



Please visit the link provided for the complete story.


The state of science & technology in the U.S. and in particular science education in the U.S. has been a topic on several threads on ATS in the past, but most Americans continue to "take it for granted" that the U.S. will continue to lead the world in these areas. That assumption has generated complacency within our schools and amongst our young and could prove very costly in the coming years.

An enormous number of benefits and advantages the U.S. has over most other countries flows directly from it's past and current leadership in science & technology. Everything from the initial "space race" with the Russians to the electronics and medical breakthroughs and advances and even the Internet have depended largely upon the U.S. lead in science & technology. A loss of that lead would have serious political and economic consequences.

Related News Links:
www.physorg.com

ModEdit: Trimmed down quoted material

[edit on 10/15/05 by FredT]

[edit on 18-10-2005 by asala]




posted on Oct, 14 2005 @ 07:36 PM
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I voted yes - BUT - it is my understanding that the USA lost its lead in science several years ago. BEFORE government scientists started complaining publicly that their work was being rewritten, changed, and modified for political purposes - but AFTER the president gagged US scientists, and prevented them from speaking publicly about prions.



posted on Oct, 14 2005 @ 10:24 PM
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According to worldwide patent surveys the U.S. still maintained a declining lead in high technology patents in 2001--the latest year for which worldwide statistics are available. However, Japan appears set to take over the lead soon, if they haven't already.

[edit on 14-10-2005 by Astronomer68]



posted on Oct, 14 2005 @ 10:38 PM
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What chance does science have in the United States when intelligent design is being contemplated for school consumption? Welcome to the Repealing of the Renaissance


Plymouth rock could do with a bit of dusting off, its going to see some more puritan soles.



posted on Oct, 14 2005 @ 10:40 PM
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Excellent point Subz, the dumbing down of America scares me. Let me qualify that as it scares me for my children and their children--me, I'm to old to worry about it.

[edit on 14-10-2005 by Astronomer68]



posted on Oct, 14 2005 @ 10:57 PM
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while other regions are catching up the US is still in the lead with their military 'contracts' (aka research subsidies for corporations like boeing, who can use advances in commercial applications)

thanks,
drfunk


df1

posted on Oct, 14 2005 @ 11:10 PM
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drfunk
while other regions are catching up the US is still in the lead with their military 'contracts' (aka research subsidies for corporations like boeing, who can use advances in commercial applications)


Is 51% of Boeing stock owned by U.S. citizens? Maybe it isn't a U.S. company either.
.



posted on Oct, 14 2005 @ 11:10 PM
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Old news.
Articles of this type were circulating since mid-2004.
U.S. Is Losing Its Dominance in the Sciences






seekerof



posted on Oct, 14 2005 @ 11:15 PM
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I agree seekerof, this is old news. I thought it was interesting because of the contrasts between what a dollar will buy in the U.S. versus some other places. That difference makes it hard to play catchup once you get behind.



posted on Oct, 15 2005 @ 12:06 AM
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I think what this really boils down to is this: The US is losing its lead in sci/tech because all of the major research houses in the US are outsourcing to other countries for the work, because of lower labor prices. This is only serving to make Americans, on the whole, lazier, and able to soak up more government funds for unemployment, or accepting more jobs where they get paid large amounts of money to do basically nothing. When we outsource all of our R&D to other countries, we lose our R&D edge. It's pretty certain that every foreign company we have doing R&D and Sci/Tech work for us is also selling/giving that research to their own countries, and thereby advancing the other countries as much as they are the US. Also, with the US subbong out more work to other nations, there's more work for trained engineers and researchers in those other nations, so of course their numbers will be skyrocketing.

China gets a lot of our technology work. I know that, just in my industry (entertainment/special events/concerts), China is one of the largest producers of components and gear for the industry, because it's cheaper to produce it there. As a result, lots of knockoffs of "American" gear are being made in China, and selling equally as well, and often with similar quality levels, but for a lot less money.

Americans become fat and lazy, and the rest of the world profits from it, in many ways besides just financially. Our American culture of leisure is already screwing us, and I firmly believe it'll be our downfall. Just take a look at Rome.



posted on Oct, 15 2005 @ 12:16 AM
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Eisenhower addressed the problem of declining interest in the sciences shortly after the Soviets launched the Sputnik and we have been playing catch-up ball ever since with periodic alerts from the experts. There is one thing we need to remember, however. Our universities are among the very best anywhere and very much of the foreign competition receives training in the US. This is not a given, however, and we must continue to strive for the very best. There is another variable that must be considered when we look at aggregate data. The US has a very large demographic which has historically declined to avail themselves of higher education even when opportunities have been handed to them on a platter. This group always drags our aggregate data down, when in fact we do produce some of the best people in the sciences. And for God's sake, will the author of this thread please fix the title?

[edit on 2005/10/15 by GradyPhilpott]



posted on Oct, 15 2005 @ 12:36 AM
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What would you have me do with the title Grady?

I agree that this topic has been run through the mill a lot, but we never seem to do anything about the situation except wring our collective hands in worry. Some value shift needs to take place so that scientists and engineers are not perceived as unglamorous geeks. More of our young people would go into the fields of science & technology if they didn't think their friends would make fun of them. Its a mindset that goes back to grade school.

[edit on 15-10-2005 by Astronomer68]



posted on Oct, 15 2005 @ 12:47 AM
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Replace "loose" with "lose"


You make the same spelling mistake in your opening paragraph. Thats the only thing that needs changing, yet I voted it up regardless.



posted on Oct, 15 2005 @ 12:50 AM
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Ok. I guess I don't know how to fix it as there is no longer an edit button.

[edit on 15-10-2005 by Astronomer68]



posted on Oct, 15 2005 @ 01:02 AM
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Maybe, if you U2U a mod. I think the story is worthy, if that small change can be made.

[edit on 2005/10/15 by GradyPhilpott]



posted on Oct, 15 2005 @ 02:28 AM
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Originally posted by Astronomer68
According to worldwide patent surveys the U.S. still maintained a declining lead in high technology patents in 2001--the latest year for which worldwide statistics are available. However, Japan appears set to take over the lead soon, if they haven't already.


The patent data from the OECD shows the EU is gaining a lot faster than Japan.
The UK, France and Germany all have higher growth rates than Japan.

It look like China and India have really high growth rates.
Even though they are very far down on the list now, they may be major players soon.

OECD Science, Technology and Industry Scoreboard 2005



posted on Oct, 15 2005 @ 02:29 AM
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This is what happens when University funding and School funding drops and drops, it is about time some of the money wasted on the "War on Terror" is pushed back into the United Stated Education system otherwise terrorists will be the least of their worries.



posted on Oct, 15 2005 @ 05:54 AM
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Originally posted by AceOfBase
The patent data from the OECD shows the EU is gaining a lot faster than Japan.
The UK, France and Germany all have higher growth rates than Japan.

It look like China and India have really high growth rates.
Even though they are very far down on the list now, they may be major players soon.


That's a good link and a nice graph, but I think it shows all patents that were reported (some data is missing if I'm not mistaken). The data I cited only covered high technology patents (and again some data is missing). The source I consulted did not define exactly what "high technology" encompassed, so I can't tell you what all it covered, but the U.S. lead shrinks considerably when only high technology patents are included.



posted on Oct, 15 2005 @ 09:57 AM
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IMO - the focus on patents is quite misleading. Anyone can apply for a US patent - doesn't mean the invention was developed here - just that the patent owner wants to access the US market.

...The idea of "scientific leadership" has more to do with real innovation, sharing knowledge, and collaborating to better the world. That's where the US is falling down most critically.



posted on Oct, 15 2005 @ 10:02 AM
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Please someone get the damn religion out of my politics.


Stem cell research, we should be there, curing every damn thing we can find, and inventing a million more disease!!!!!!


But sadly we can't due to church and state intermarriages.

It's almost as bad as New Agers.


WE REQUIRE MORE SCIENCE SPAWN MORE SCIENTIST!


What we need more of is SCIENCE - MC Stephen Hawking



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