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anti gravity air craft!

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posted on Oct, 21 2005 @ 04:18 AM
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Originally posted by Murcielago
I say all those people who claim to be knowledgeable about anti-gravity to make something fly up into space with no fuel.

all those anti grav sites are garbage...and what it all comes down to it made up junk and hoaxes, hoping to grab the attention of the weak minded and have them pay 30 bucks for there exclusive dvd which explains how it all works.


I'll believe it, when I see it. which will probably be around 600 years...so I probably wont see it.


If its garbage, why is the foremost, most respected aeronautical publication in the world (Jane's), bothering with articles about Anti-Grav? Nick Cook is widely regarded as well........Dont dismiss it just yet!

Spacemunkey




posted on Oct, 21 2005 @ 04:28 AM
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Sounds very interesting... I'll have to look and seee what the internet tells me...
Nice links everybody...



[edit on 21-10-2005 by Figher Master FIN]



posted on Oct, 21 2005 @ 05:32 AM
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You might ask why nobody's taking antigravity research seriously... such a thing would reduce the cost of orbiting payloads to a few dollars a kilo. But then, so would scramjets, recoverable first stages, SSTOs, monotomic fuels (liquid H as opposed to H2), MHD thrusters and laser launchers (OK, at least drop it by a factor of 10).

The simple truth is that NASA and co. study these ideas, say they're good, and then do nothing about them. Ion drives were first demonstrated in orbit in the 1960s and only now are they actually being used in space probes. BTW, NASA is researching anti-gravity, warp drive and free energy - in fact, they're looking at every possible idea. They're also handing out prizes for orbital elevator technology (we can't build one on Earth but we can on the moon with current tech). ESA is researching orbital tethers to fling cargo to various orbits.

Will we expect to see ant-gravity, even if it *is* technically feasible? Of course not. These drives will obviously require a lot of R&D, and the unit cost is likely to be high. You have to consider payoff.



posted on Oct, 21 2005 @ 01:36 PM
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AFAIK, NASA's 'antigravity' (and they refused to call it that!) program based on spinning superconductors was cancelled in '03, as they decided not to continue funding due to the lack of positive results.



posted on Oct, 21 2005 @ 04:39 PM
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Originally posted by Murcielago
all those anti grav sites are garbage...and what it all comes down to it made up junk and hoaxes, hoping to grab the attention of the weak minded and have them pay 30 bucks for there exclusive dvd which explains how it all works.



Some of those devices are most likely driven by an ion storm and not anti-gravity, atleast at lower frequensies. They did some tests in vacuume on one of the antigravity.com lifters and it did not move, so it probably is a ion storm propultion system. There have been some experiments in the 50's that actually showed working models in vacume too, which is intriquing. Have a look here:

www.soteria.com...



posted on Oct, 24 2005 @ 12:17 AM
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deleted

[edit on 24-10-2005 by orca71]



posted on Oct, 24 2005 @ 04:04 AM
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Originally posted by Wembley

AFAIK, NASA's 'antigravity' (and they refused to call it that!) program based on spinning superconductors was cancelled in '03, as they decided not to continue funding due to the lack of positive results.


It's there under "advanced propulsion"... mainly they're looking at things like warp drives and free energy. The closest they admit to coming to antigravity is a "gravity shield." I do know that they have examined and rejected Brown effect "lifters" as being explained by ion wind. I'll see if I can dig up that particular site.




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