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Make us buy smaller cars!

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posted on Oct, 12 2005 @ 10:40 PM
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I may be a little out of touch, I've done nothing but work and do homework for the last two weeks it seems. But has the idea of putting some type of incentive for consumers to buy smaller, higher milage to the gallon cars(for example a Honda Accord - my car!). And maybe a penalty for bigger, gas hogs (Can anyone Hum V). I beleive its something already in place for hybrids, though.

I know Bush is trying to get the manufactors to make trucks more feul effiecient, but why even push for that when there are so many vehicles that aready are. In my opinion, the average person I know doesn't need a huge trunk for everyday driving. SUVs were made to go off-road, now they are nothing more that signs of how much money you make (or more accurately, how much credit I can get and dept I can get into). I can see tax-breaks for business, I guess because they "pass the savings on to the consumer" - oh whatever.

OK, this is a mostly selfish wish, since I don't like anything bigger than a Ford Escape or Explorer.

[edit on 12-10-2005 by Shaione]

[edit on 12-10-2005 by Shaione]




posted on Oct, 12 2005 @ 10:43 PM
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Simple. Incease the Gas Tax slowly over a 2 year period to avoid economic shocks and do it by .50 cents. Wait 2 more years to see how the market reacts and then raise it again another .50 cents over 2 years and just keep repeating until Gas consumption is cut in half. I can be done but who's fooling who it won't happen with Bush or any Republican in office.



posted on Oct, 12 2005 @ 10:45 PM
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Shaione I think that market forces will do that naturally enough.

Once the petrol prices starts to bite in peoples pockets they will realise that driving a hummer around the city is a pretty stupid idea.

However if people don't take the hint, then either they have so much money that they don't notice or there are other reasons for having such a vehicle that is greater than the cost of running it. Thats their free choice.

At one time there were extra taxes on larger vehicles, I remember the Nissan Terrano was imported as a work wehicle, and avoided tax (I think). Maybe someone closer to the situation may have a better idea.

Just today i was reading an article on Ford and Holden (Australian manufacturers) and how they are selling big cars in a shrinking market, eventually they will eaither close, or realise that smaller vehicles will get bought more. I think car manufacturers make more profit from bigger vehicles, so are reluctant to move away.

Scarily enough for them, China is starting to produce vehicles at a much lower price that they may be unable to compete with and within a decade they may flood the western markets, just like Korean vehicles do today

[edit on 12-10-2005 by Netchicken]



posted on Oct, 12 2005 @ 10:47 PM
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Originally posted by Netchicken
Shaione I think that market forces will do that naturally enough.

Once the petrol prices starts to bite in peoples pockets they will realise that driving a hummer around the city is a pretty stupid idea.

However if people don't take the hint, then either they have so much money that they don't notice or there are other reasons for having such a vehicle that is greater than the cost of running it. Thats their free choice.

At one time there were extra taxes on larger vehicles, I remember the Nissan Terrano was imported as a work wehicle, and avoided tax (I think). Maybe someone closer to the situation may have a better idea.



Yea, you would think people would get the hint. But in my area, I've seen a sharp rise in Hummer owners. But, we will see.



posted on Oct, 12 2005 @ 10:51 PM
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Thats their right to buy big vehicles, but, as owners are finding now, their resale cost is dropping. I saw a TV article saying how dealers are not buying larger vehicles as much now realising that they will be harder to sell in the future.

I see SUV's on the side of the road for sale at prices up to 1/2 what i would have expected a few years ago.



posted on Oct, 12 2005 @ 11:01 PM
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Some people require them (trucks etc) to make a living. Alot of business relies on larger vehicles.

I dont even live near pavement and we get a couple yards of snow !

I will hop in my geo metro and everything will be just fine.....

Seriously though, I do own a small car that gets good gas mileage. The point is that it isnt always possible to drive it.

Also we are in agriculture. You think you have worries? Try fill up some of those beasts. $400 a tank for combines running 12 hours a day for a few weeks is not fun.




posted on Oct, 14 2005 @ 08:57 PM
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i drive a civic
, i dont think ill ever drive a bigger car again
small cars rule.

next car i want is a honda jazz/fit, honda beat, or a honda city turbo all smaller that a civic



posted on Oct, 14 2005 @ 09:29 PM
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Originally posted by sardion2000
Simple. Incease the Gas Tax slowly over a 2 year period to avoid economic shocks and do it by .50 cents. Wait 2 more years to see how the market reacts and then raise it again another .50 cents over 2 years and just keep repeating until Gas consumption is cut in half. I can be done but who's fooling who it won't happen with Bush or any Republican in office.


What are you, nuts? That sounds like something they'd do in Canada or one of those lefty European countries.


Two years ago I bought a Ford Focus. I always liked the mileage, but after the brutal last few months of gas price hikes I'm smiling to and from work every day. In the middle of mountain Winter snows I'll still have to drive my 4X4 SUV to work, but that little car is a Godsend most of the year.



posted on Oct, 14 2005 @ 10:08 PM
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That's exactly the type of response I'd expect from a someone sticking his/her head in the sand. Look at the economics, 1 year ago only 5 % of new car buyers were considering buying a Hybrid for a 500 dollar premium. Now with Gas prices even higher that number is now 1/3rd of new car buyers at a 3000 dollar premium.

If you do it gradually over time the economic stresses would be minimalized and in the end what doesn't kill your economy will only make it stronger (by cutting Gasoline consumption there will be more money in the pockets of consumers no matter what way you look at it)

Here are a few links on economics, educate yourself


en.wikipedia.org...

Higher Gas prices will spur innovation which in turn will lower demand. Sputs of Innovation also create jobs and even whole new Markets could get created


en.wikipedia.org...

It's quite simple. The hard part is doing it in such a way as to minimalize economic disruption. 50 cents may be a bit excessive though I agree.

[edit on 14-10-2005 by sardion2000]

[edit on 14-10-2005 by sardion2000]



posted on Oct, 14 2005 @ 10:26 PM
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I think there should be incentives for buying smaller more fuel efficient cars. But you have to remember everybody does not have the luxury of buying a smaller car. Chances are anyone with a big family are not going to make do with a Honda Accord. They do have some new Hybrid SUVs now but im not sure how well they sell or how much MPG they get.



posted on Oct, 14 2005 @ 10:50 PM
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Why force anyone to give the government more money?



WASHINGTON — The United States has an oil reserve at least three times that of Saudi Arabia locked in oil-shale deposits beneath federal land in Colorado, Utah and Wyoming.


The tax spoken of on this thread and any forceful government stipulation more or less fining people for low mileage autos hurts the most economically vulnerable just to salve your ideals or politics.

If you want to focus on the most egregious and flamboyant waste then complain about the rich, famous or corporate individuals who use a families years worth of fuel on a single transcontinental flight for dubious reasons in their private jets. Of course these are the very same people that could absorb your tax and fines without a lifestyle change, not the people hit with a general tax.

The oil shale does take energy to extract which can be done in place, best way is to site a nuclear power station nearby so that pollution is kept to a minimum. (no fossil air pollution)

The current economics support this so long as enviromental considerations are kept in the realm of common sense.

No tax on those least able to afford it.
No unreasonable restrictions on peoples choice.
No class warfare.
No reliance on middle eastern sources.
No wars for oil.
No brainer, what're we waiting for?

Oil Shale Reserves



[edit on 14-10-2005 by Phoenix]



posted on Oct, 15 2005 @ 12:15 AM
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Does Canada also have a massive Oil Shale deposit? That would be sweet if North America turned out to have the largest oil supplies in the world.



posted on Oct, 15 2005 @ 12:26 AM
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As pointed out above, market forces will change how and what people buy. We have a midsize SUV its a ULEV vehicle but not a hybrid. WHy do we have it? Well its easier to lug our son and his stuff around in it. We also go to Tahoe at least 5 times in the winter so having the 4WD is appealing to us.

Also we did the math on hybrids and it does not add up. Figuring $4 a gallon, the Civic hybrid would take us 8-10 years to recoup the cost based on our driving patterns and the wildly optimistic EPA MPG rating. That is also assuming that the battery pack works that long and does not require a change etc. That also factored in a Federal tax rebate as well.



posted on Oct, 16 2005 @ 04:29 PM
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Originally posted by FredT
As pointed out above, market forces will change how and what people buy. We have a midsize SUV its a ULEV vehicle but not a hybrid. WHy do we have it? Well its easier to lug our son and his stuff around in it. We also go to Tahoe at least 5 times in the winter so having the 4WD is appealing to us.

Also we did the math on hybrids and it does not add up. Figuring $4 a gallon, the Civic hybrid would take us 8-10 years to recoup the cost based on our driving patterns and the wildly optimistic EPA MPG rating. That is also assuming that the battery pack works that long and does not require a change etc. That also factored in a Federal tax rebate as well.



bet you didnt know that honda sells a 4wd civic did you
well they do just not here, its known as the honda ferio (same as sedan) its 4wd and can come witha 6spd manual trans


hybrids are still pretty rough in my opinion, but i must admit one thing is that toyota pretty much has the hybrid game on lock with their synergy drive (man thats hard to say being a honda guy) but i think that new direct ijection engines can get just as good if not better milage than current hybrids and make just as much power if mot more.



posted on Oct, 16 2005 @ 04:36 PM
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In the UK we pay road tax. Anything above 1.4 litre is subjected to a higher road tax bill.

I have just changed a 4x4, 2.2litre for a smaller car with a 2.0 litre engine, and i am still paying the same amount of road tax as before.

It is all about reducing the 'Gas Guzzelers', but my new car does do more to the gallon than my 4x4 did, therefore i cannot see the logic in paying the same road tax as something that does 15 miles to the gallon.

Governments, dont ya just love em?



posted on Oct, 16 2005 @ 05:10 PM
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While looking at the Toyota Yaris, that start to sell in Canada, I ran across the Toyota site in France, and I saw the Aygo (look at the specifications):

www.aygo.fr...

3.4 liter per 100 km on highway (diesel engine), this is very good, close to a "Smart".
5.3 liter per 100 km in city.
4.1 liter per 100 km (combined city - highway), about half of my Pontiac Vibe, which is a very efficient car.

These type of cars, need to be available for Canada and desesperatly more so in the USA.



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