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Should Karl Rove be Indicted?

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posted on Oct, 10 2005 @ 03:12 PM
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As sweet as it would be to see this lead to Jr (and his impeachment), it has to bring down the VP first, because that's who we'll be stuck with in the event of...




posted on Oct, 10 2005 @ 03:28 PM
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Originally posted by TrueLies

Besides you being the word police and turning the thread into one about semantics, I think we all get what she meant.


What you call semantics, someone incarcerated would definitely regard as reality. Contact an individual in a correctional facility, and inquire as to whether they prefer being convicted vice indicted; see how far your "semantics" go to comfort them.

Word police indeed. :shk:



posted on Oct, 10 2005 @ 03:42 PM
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That's true Mirthful One, when you stop to consider that an indictment is still a presumption of innocence until proven guilty. Then we have a conviction.

Fitzgerald's job is to find the evidence, present it to the grand jury which then decides if there is enough there to take to trial to prove guilt--whichever rock it's hidding under.



posted on Oct, 10 2005 @ 06:43 PM
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Rove is lucky he's not bound by Napoleonic law, or he'd be in the crowbar motel already. Sometimes the system seems too lucrative when you have the power and money, cause then it comes down to your personal honor and morals.

As his legal advisor, I would recommend a "Don't Hate Me Cause I'm Fat, Bald and Ugly" t-shirt for his next grand jury testimony.



[edit on 10-10-2005 by Regenmacher]



posted on Oct, 10 2005 @ 06:45 PM
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"Meanwhile, lawyers for possible indictment targets are boning up on the Espionage Act, used to charge Daniel Ellsberg, leaker of the Pentagon papers, say people close to the probe.

Fitzgerald would face fewer hurdles proving a case under the statute, which bars transmitting "information relating to the national defense" to anyone not entitled to receive it, than under the more exacting Intelligence Identities Protection Act.

But national-security lawyer Kate Martin says, "Civil libertarians have always objected to [the Espionage Act] being used to prosecute leaks to the press."

Though Ellsberg's indictment was dismissed, the statute was used to convict naval analyst Samuel Morison, in 1985 for giving a satellite photo to a defense magazine, and Pentagon official Lawrence Franklin last week for passing secrets to a pro-Israel group. "

www.cnn.com...



wouldn't that be a good kick in the ole pants........Espionage??



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