SCI/TECH: Ancient Interstellar Collision: May Help Explain Climate Change

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posted on Jan, 29 2007 @ 03:58 PM
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A cosmic sleeper post rises form the ashes like a Phoenix.

Thanks for raising the Galactic Titanic, Sofi... I haven't given much thought about GRBs and terresterial events lately, since the sun is in hibernation mode. I should of probably paid more attention, since our heliosphere is not as strong, we are more apt to be effected large space collosions, supernova, black hole formation, pulsars, and magnetars.

It's been a long running debate that a gravity wave preceding a GRB on December 27th may have been responsible for the Christmas Tsunami.

9.0 tsunami quake N. Sumatra: December 26, 2004 at 00:58:53 UTC
Record gamma ray burst: December 27 at 21:30:26 UTC

Currently, we are under the influence of a coronal stream, so if the clipper front that is forecasted to hit the US central plains suddenly dies, I wouldn't be too surprised.

Extraterrestrial Climatic Effects CO2 Science
Space Weather Prediction with Cosmic Rays bartol.udel.edu

As for an ice age coming, I wouldn't count on one anytime soon...

[edit on 29-1-2007 by Regenmacher]




posted on Feb, 26 2009 @ 10:27 AM
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Bump.

Spin your wheels to distraction, or ask your representatives the important question: "What is being done to ensure this nation's survival, and the survival of the human species?"

.



posted on Feb, 27 2009 @ 10:56 PM
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reply to post by soficrow
 


I am so glad to have seen this outstanding thread!


Awesome work, soficrow. I can't believe I missed it the first time around.

I should be busy for days to come with all of the great info!

[edit on 27-2-2009 by loam]



posted on Feb, 27 2009 @ 11:33 PM
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I find it strange how most of you believe "astro-environmental" causes are more likely than things actually happening right here on our planet. Local causation just seems much more likely. You have the Hadley cells, air currents, the global ocean currents system, thermal convection, the carbon feedback cycle, etc. Phytoplankton are even making clouds...

astrobio.net...


Discovery of the new link between clouds and the biosphere grew out of efforts to explain increased cloud cover observed over an area of the Southern Ocean where a large bloom of phytoplankton was occurring. Based on satellite data, the researchers hypothesized that airborne particles produced by oxidation of the chemical isoprene which is emitted by the phytoplankton may have contributed to a doubling of cloud droplet concentrations seen over a large area of ocean off the eastern coast of South America.


Also, we are moving carbon around in unpredictable fashion. In terms of comparable methods of carbon release in other organisms, humans have surely invented the oddest ways to do so. Smokestacks send carbon emissions shooting vertically into the air. Cars and planes jet out exhaust in random distribution as they travel horizontally across space, destined to wherever their passengers feel like enjoying their winter vacations. There's no predictability governing the emission of carbon from human sources. I don't see this trend as being very stable.

In an effort to deny the reality of our affect on the planet, we shift our attention to so-called phenomena in space, which we have absolutely no control over. That seems like a nice coincidence, doesn't it? It takes the blame off us, and allows us to spend and consume without moral recourse for the costs we are incurring on the planet. We can now truly live in excess without care for cause.

[edit on 27-2-2009 by cognoscente]



posted on Feb, 28 2009 @ 12:05 PM
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Originally posted by cognoscente
I find it strange how most of you believe "astro-environmental" causes are more likely than things actually happening right here on our planet. Local causation just seems much more likely. You have the Hadley cells, air currents, the global ocean currents system, thermal convection, the carbon feedback cycle, etc. Phytoplankton are even making clouds...

...
In an effort to deny the reality of our affect on the planet, we shift our attention to so-called phenomena in space, which we have absolutely no control over. That seems like a nice coincidence, doesn't it? It takes the blame off us, and allows us to spend and consume without moral recourse for the costs we are incurring on the planet. We can now truly live in excess without care for cause.




Agreed, noted and starred. Thanks cognoscente!

FYI - I DON"T believe " "astro-environmental" causes are more likely than things actually happening right here on our planet." I emphatically do not believe that an "either/or" presentation is useful.

...I think it's clear that our planet is a complex dynamic system, impacted and influenced by a variety of factors near and far. I also agree that human activity has profound and complex effects on our environment and planet's system(s). Kind of a no-brainer, IMO.

I do not believe that acknowledging a variety of relevant truths detracts from understanding - rather, such acknowledgment leads to greater knowledge, and better potential for appropriate action.

So true - we cannot control "so-called phenomena in space," BUT we can clean up our own act and get our own house in order.

I hope accurate information will highlight the urgency of the problem, and the need for global planning and response.



BTW - I believe in the democratic process - despite its failings and drawbacks. I do NOT believe that short-circuiting the process by censoring information leads to more "efficient" or effective responses. Yes, it takes a frustratingly long time for people to assimilate and integrate new and apparently contradictory information - but in the end, I respect the process, and the need for it.

.



posted on Mar, 6 2009 @ 08:40 PM
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Originally posted by cognoscente
I find it strange how most of you believe "astro-environmental" causes are more likely than things actually happening right here on our planet. Local causation just seems much more likely.


Actually, the astro-environmental cause is the most influential impact on climate. How anyone could think otherwise leads me to believe there has been an awful lot of cool-aid drinking going on out there.

The sun is not stable as far as its emissions and its solar winds influence climate on this and every other planet in the solar system.

Therefore, a changing climate has been and always will be. In fact, as far as climate is concerned, the only constant is that it will change. If you want a static climate, you are on the wrong hunk of rock. Carbon taxes, horse-drawn carriages, a statue to Algore and the Church of Global Warming; nothing this puny human race can do to stop it.



posted on Feb, 7 2010 @ 05:54 PM
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Originally posted by astrocreep

Originally posted by cognoscente
I find it strange how most of you believe "astro-environmental" causes are more likely than things actually happening right here on our planet. Local causation just seems much more likely.


Actually, the astro-environmental cause is the most influential impact on climate. How anyone could think otherwise leads me to believe there has been an awful lot of cool-aid drinking going on out there.

The sun is not stable as far as its emissions and its solar winds influence climate on this and every other planet in the solar system.

Therefore, a changing climate has been and always will be. In fact, as far as climate is concerned, the only constant is that it will change. If you want a static climate, you are on the wrong hunk of rock. Carbon taxes, horse-drawn carriages, a statue to Algore and the Church of Global Warming; nothing this puny human race can do to stop it.



Gawd you're good astrocreep - can't believe I missed this post.


At the same time, I think the evidence shows clearly that human activities do indeed impact the planet, sometimes dramatically.

...At the moment, I'm most concerned about our l'il rock's geophysical (in)stability. Far too much mucking about with seismic events and triggers, imho.

Respectfully,
moi



posted on Apr, 16 2011 @ 01:29 PM
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NOTE: Itop1's new thread, Extreme weather is moving tectonic plates, scientists claim made me remember this one. Thanks, Itop1.

...Seems that many solar, galactic and interstellar events can affect our planet - and maybe it starts with affecting the magnetic field and weather...

So - The single-cause-single-effect bandwagon is a HUGE mistake. Systems theory will provide more answers, and maybe some kind of solutions to the woes we face as a species and inhabitants of Planet Earth.



edit on 16/4/11 by soficrow because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 16 2011 @ 04:19 PM
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Great thread soficrow!
S & F!

Has Al Gore been notified? I wonder how long it will take him to come up with a theory to counter this claim?

(Looking @ watch)....gotta go! Time has snuck up on me. I'll return to read some more responses.



posted on Apr, 16 2011 @ 08:20 PM
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Originally posted by Intelearthling
Great thread soficrow!
S & F!


Thanks.




Has Al Gore been notified? I wonder how long it will take him to come up with a theory to counter this claim?


Awww. Give him some credit - he tried. Kinda like the Personal Responsibility in Health Act - nobody wants to admit we're totally screwed, it's all out of control and there's NOTHING we can do to stop the cosmic tsunami - so they focus on the 0.0001% where we might maybe have a bit of a particle of personal power and a speck of a chip of control. And then they hold us accountable, like we're the Titans.



...It's times like these that Taoism makes a LOT of sense.


edit on 16/4/11 by soficrow because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 25 2012 @ 12:15 PM
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WOW! My research has lead me to this thread!


So....what do you make of this thread now OP?

Here is something worth while...its a lengthy read but I think you will see....it relates.


www.etheric.com...

There are a lot of Earth Changes going on and I feel as though this is just the beginning. No fear here...just realistic.

This video is also lengthy..but it too goes hand and hand with what is going on.


www.youtube.com...
edit on 25-2-2012 by MamaJ because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 25 2012 @ 07:48 PM
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reply to post by MamaJ
 


Thanks MamaJ - great links too.
...It will take me a while to go through them though. ...Our world does change a lot doesn't it? Trying to get a handle on it is like raising a kid - just when you figure out what's happening, they're into another phase or stage. And you're miles behind again.

Oh yeah - I think this thread is still relevant. Lots of good questions, directions.

Thanks for commenting,
sofi



posted on Feb, 26 2012 @ 07:33 AM
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Originally posted by soficrow
reply to post by MamaJ
 


Thanks MamaJ - great links too.
...It will take me a while to go through them though. ...Our world does change a lot doesn't it? Trying to get a handle on it is like raising a kid - just when you figure out what's happening, they're into another phase or stage. And you're miles behind again.

Oh yeah - I think this thread is still relevant. Lots of good questions, directions.

Thanks for commenting,
sofi



Thanks to you too! Please take your time...but by all means go through what I laid out before you and know this....there are plenty more links saved in my favorites.
I have done a lengthy investigation and of course with any seeker...it is still ongoing.



posted on Feb, 26 2012 @ 08:11 AM
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reply to post by MamaJ
 


This is a bit off the wall, but our discussion here sparked a niggling memory and after some effort I tracked down the title. I suspect the work is at least somewhat relevant even though I've never seen or read it. Author Zindel is a science teacher: The Effect of Gamma Rays on Man-in-the-Moon Marigolds.

btw - I certainly know we exist in a much larger context than our own little planet and solar system, but take great exception to the argument that because we are so "small" and the universe is so "big" that nothing we do matters or can have any impact. I have no doubt that human activities impact life and our planet in diverse and mysterious ways - many destructive.



posted on Feb, 26 2012 @ 09:27 AM
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Originally posted by soficrow
reply to post by MamaJ
 


This is a bit off the wall, but our discussion here sparked a niggling memory and after some effort I tracked down the title. I suspect the work is at least somewhat relevant even though I've never seen or read it. Author Zindel is a science teacher: The Effect of Gamma Rays on Man-in-the-Moon Marigolds.

btw - I certainly know we exist in a much larger context than our own little planet and solar system, but take great exception to the argument that because we are so "small" and the universe is so "big" that nothing we do matters or can have any impact. I have no doubt that human activities impact life and our planet in diverse and mysterious ways - many destructive.



I totally agree. Thoughts are powerful imo and what we put out is equally as powerful.

Have not heard of the play or book but I will research the topic and see what I come up with.


Man has not learned from history and this to me is sad! How did we end up sooooo far from where we should be in regards to who we are, why we are here, and how to care for our home/Planet?



posted on Feb, 26 2012 @ 04:27 PM
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What a fantastic thread, really enjoyed reading hard science for once, glad I'm on ATS.com.
As for the thrice damned CO2, after years of asking I have still to get an answer to this question ' with CO2 being 383 parts per million, that's less than one percent of the atmosphere, how can so little heat so much?'



posted on Feb, 27 2012 @ 07:39 AM
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reply to post by pikestaff
 


You need to think "complex interactive system" instead of direct "cause and effect." Maybe start with the "cascade" concept?




posted on Apr, 14 2014 @ 09:06 AM
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Mauddib's old thread always reminds me of this one.


...I think it's clear that our planet is a complex dynamic system, impacted and influenced by a variety of factors near and far. I also agree that human activity has profound and complex effects on our environment and planet's system(s). Kind of a no-brainer, IMO.

I do not believe that acknowledging a variety of relevant truths detracts from understanding - rather, such acknowledgment leads to greater knowledge, and better potential for appropriate action.

So true - we cannot control "so-called phenomena in space," BUT we can clean up our own act and get our own house in order.

I hope accurate information will highlight the urgency of the problem, and the need for global planning and response.



BTW - I believe in the democratic process - despite its failings and drawbacks. I do NOT believe that short-circuiting the process by censoring information leads to more "efficient" or effective responses. Yes, it takes a frustratingly long time for people to assimilate and integrate new and apparently contradictory information - but in the end, I respect the process, and the need for it.





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