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NEWS: Archeologists Claim Odysseus' Tomb and Capital Ithaca Found

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posted on Oct, 3 2005 @ 01:33 PM
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In what may be a case of portions of myth turning out to be historical fact, Greek archeologists assert that they have discovered the tomb and legendary capital of Odysseus, hero of Homer's The Odyssey. For years, many have searched the island of Ithaca (Ithaki) for the ruins of the capital described in Homer's works, assuming that it would lie there since the isle and the mythical city share the same name. However using Homer's descriptions as a guide, the 1991 revealing of a tomb apparently used to bury royalty and artifacts found within, combined with studies of surrounding landmarks and ancient structures, have led archeologists to claim that the village of Poros on Kefalonia Island is the site of the City of Ithaca and Odysseus' resting place. The former governor of the the region has also claimed conspiracy to cover up the revelations in order to protect the tourist industry of modern-day Ithaca.
 



maderatribune.1871dev.com
But two pieces of fairly recent evidence suggest archeologists were looking in the wrong place. In 1991, a tomb of the type used to bury ancient Greek royalty was found near the hamlet of Tzannata in the hills outside Poros. It is the largest such tomb in northeastern Greece, with remains of at least 72 persons found in its stone niches.

One find there is particularly telling. In Book XIX of the “Odyssey,” the just-returned and still disguised Odysseus tells his wife (who may or may not realize who she’s talking to; Homer is deliberately ambivalent) that he encountered Odysseus many years earlier on the island of Crete. He describes in detail a gold brooch the king wore on that occasion. A gold brooch meeting that precise description lies now in the archeological museum at Argostoli, the main city on Kefalonia, 30 miles across the island from Poros.

Greek archeologists also found sections of ancient city walls extending for miles through the hills around and well beyond Poros. These surround both the village and a steep adjacent hill which bears evidence it once served as an acropolis, what the Greeks called hilltop forts in most of their major cities. The stones of the walls date to about 1300 B.C., the approximate time of events described in the “Iliad” and “Odyssey.”


Please visit the link provided for the complete story.


Can anyone shed more light on the search for Ithaca, and whether or not these new claims are bunk? Is this just a ploy to bring tourism dollars?

I've started a thread with maps and pictures in the Ancient & Lost Civilizations forum of the locations mentioned here:
www.abovetopsecret.com...

Related News Links:
www.freerepublic.com
www.atrium-media.com

[edit on 2005-10-3 by wecomeinpeace]




posted on Oct, 4 2005 @ 05:04 AM
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Even if it is a ploy, who cares?

Maybe I'm in the minority, but ancient civilisations have alsways fascinated me. Where I am now I can see ruins that are hundresd of years old, but not thousands. This sounds like the search for Arthur's capital, Camelot. Brits are still combing Cornwall looking for clues and hints, why shouldn't the Greeks be doing the same?

People are still searching Israel for clues that will prove the New Testament, the most recent find was the well/pool of someone or other...(could anyone vague that up for me!)

I'd need half a decade to see all the things I want to in the cradles of civilisation, Tigris/Euphrates valleys, Greece/Rome and the Nile valley. And then I'd need another five years to explore all the stuff that I found out about after I arrived.

That's before I even contemplate hacking my way through south and central American jungles...



posted on Oct, 4 2005 @ 05:13 AM
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Anicent Greek always fascinates me. Even my favourite Nintendo game was Battle of Olympus, there is something about Greek mythology and culture that just draws me in.

I also remember reading the Odyssey when I was 10 years old and it left me spellbound. If they have found Ithaca its just one more reason added to hundreds to visit Greece. Its definately on my 'to do list'.



posted on Mar, 21 2006 @ 10:51 AM
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Sarcophagus bears scenes from Homer



Chicago Tribune

By George Psyllides
Associated Press
Published March 21, 2006

NICOSIA, Cyprus -- A 2,500-year-old sarcophagus with vivid color illustrations from Homer's epics has been discovered in western Cyprus, archeologists said Monday.

Construction workers found the limestone sarcophagus last week in a tomb near the village of Kouklia in the coastal Paphos area. The tomb had been looted during antiquity.

"The style of the decoration is unique, not so much from an artistic point of view, but for the subject and the colors used," said Pavlos Flourentzos, director of the island's antiquities department.

Only two similar sarcophagi have been discovered in Cyprus before. One is housed in New York's Metropolitan Museum of Art and the other in the British Museum in London, but their colors are more faded, Flourentzos said.

He said the coffin dates to 500 B.C., when Greek influence was gaining a firm hold on the eastern Mediterranean island.

Experts believe the ornate decoration features the hero Ulysses in scenes from Homer's "The Iliad" and "The Odyssey," both hugely popular throughout the Greek world.

Archeologists think the scenes hint at the status of the coffin's occupant.

"Why else take these two pieces from Homer and why deal with Ulysses? Maybe this represents the dead person's character--who possibly was a warrior," Flourentzos said.

Homer's epics probably were composed around 800 B.C. and written in the 6th Century B.C.

Please visit the link provided for the complete story.


*That's the entire article there.

Found some more info on this at: edition.cnn.com...


This image shows two warriors on a chariot, one of several scenes from Homer painted on the sarcophagus.

Experts believe the ornate decoration features the hero Ulysses in scenes from Homer's Iliad and Odyssey -- both hugely popular throughout the Greek world.

In one large painting, Ulysses and his comrades escape from the blind Cyclops Polyphemos' cave, hidden under a flock of sheep. Another depicts a battle between Greeks and Trojans from the Iliad.

Archeologists think the scenes hint at the status of the coffin's occupant.

"Why else take these two pieces from Homer and why deal with Ulysses? Maybe this represents the dead person's character -- who possibly was a warrior," Flourentzos said.

Other drawings depict a figure carrying a seriously injured or dead man and a lion fighting a wild boar under a tree. These are not believed to be linked with Homer's poems.

Reflecting a long oral tradition loosely based on historic events, Homer's epics were probably composed around 800 B.C. and written down in the 6th century B.C.

Please visit the link provided for the complete story.



posted on Mar, 21 2006 @ 01:18 PM
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I have always felt that the major proof that the Illiad and Odyessy cycle and their asociated tales, myths and plays was the richness of detail that they contian, ranging from physical discriptions to individual motivations. It is too elaborate to be entirely legend.



posted on Mar, 21 2006 @ 01:20 PM
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o.p. by HRIV
People are still searching Israel for clues that will prove the New Testament, the most recent find was the well/pool of someone or other...(could anyone vague that up for me!)


They think they found the place near the River Jordan where John the Baptist used to do his thing.



KIBBUTZ TZUBA, Israel — Archaeologists said Monday they have found a cave where they believe John the Baptist anointed many of his disciples — a huge cistern with 28 steps leading to an underground pool of water.


I am also fascinated by Greek Mythology and the prospects of this find. I'm looking forward to following this story.



posted on Mar, 21 2006 @ 01:59 PM
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I love mythology.

I am the believer that behind every tale of or saga from the ancient times has real roots of real events.

The problem with the veracity of the stories is the way that people will refer to them and embellished them to make them so interesting and many times hard to believe.

The heroes of mythology could have been just simple men with exceptional qualities.

But they have been enhanced to the point of not just exceptional but incredible.

What is the down side of this? Well when discoveries are made the entire picture that we have created in our minds change, we do like fantasy and fantastic tales after all.

At least I do.

I hope we may learn more about this discovery.



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