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Freemason Regalia

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posted on Sep, 19 2005 @ 05:05 PM
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Do freemasons have a lot of stuff that they need to wear at the lodge? If so, is there a locker there where they can leave it, or do they have to bring it home? Does it need to be kept out of sight from family members?

What about associated books? Can they stay at the lodge?




posted on Sep, 19 2005 @ 05:16 PM
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Regalia varies enormously between jurisdictions and orders. I have mine own apron, collar and gloves whereas a typical US mason would use an apron provided by the lodge. Some side orders require full dress with swords, the full monty. Others don't even have aprons any more.

Take your pick!



posted on Sep, 19 2005 @ 08:11 PM
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i keep my apron gloves and collar thingy (hows that called in english?) in a case i bring with me on lodge nights. The rest like swords and the like are kept in a locker. I got to browse in those lockers once, and there is a lot of stuff in there : like material used for initiations (like a coffin, its used for the master degree initiation). litterally tons of stuff.



posted on Sep, 19 2005 @ 08:22 PM
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Your not realy required to wear anything symbolic to lodge(unless your an officer). But it does seem to be protocol(or mannors) to wear something semi-formal. Like a suit.
Most of the stuff in our closet, belonges to the youth groups. Or eastern star.



posted on Sep, 19 2005 @ 10:35 PM
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In my lodge, everyone is required to wear an apron, but these are supplied by the lodge, and left on a rack as you enter/leave. Dress is semi casual to tuxedos, I have seen tshirts, but no shorts.



posted on Sep, 19 2005 @ 10:48 PM
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Nobody brings anything. IF you show up with one of those briefcase thingies, everyone suspects you're from the GL of TX!

There are a whole bunch of linen aprons on a couple of pegs in a little foyer outside the lodge room. We usually make a couple of jokes about needing to tie a couple of them together to go around the fat guys. Then we joke about who's doing the dishes now that we've eaten.

As far as "collar thingy" (masons usually refer to it as a "Jewel"), they are a mark of office, and are kept in the lodgeroom for use by a substitute if you can't show up. If you are Grand Poobah of the Mystic Viewmaster, and you can't make it, someone else puts on your 3-D glasses and says the lines, so that the lodge is opened in due form. (titles and objects in this paragraph have been changed, to protect the innocent)

I haven't been in a Texas lodge where they wear gloves (except for officers, maybe). Our stewards, deacons don't usually carry their staves around, either.

My lodge is incredibly informal. There are a lot of young guys, and telecommuters. One dude shows up in those baggy pajama-looking pants, and the other officers sort of roll their eyes. A few of us try to wear a necktie and jacket, but a lot of the factory types aren't about to go for that.

The funny thing is that while the lodge fronts on a sidestreet downtown, most people park in the parking lot of a pool-supply company across the alley, and actually go in and out through what is technically the back door. If somone knocks on the front door, the whole dinner assembly of guys and their wives spins around and stares.

As far as the differences between states, the ritual varies about like reading different translations of the Bible in English. The words are the same, just slightly different order. Texas has kept a lot of fairly archaic English. One of my friends was telling me that California and Kansas both have "modernized" the language--on the other hand, they still walk around with staves and gloves and tails, like it was a jack the ripper movie.


There isn't every joking DURING the ritual itself. Otherwise, the same old jokes every mason knows. I made some of them myself after the EA degree. "Initiation room? I thought you were all going to the men's room! I was trying to follow you into the toilet!" and the ever popular "Where's the cake? You all have on aprons and carry those little pie-servers, but where's the Cake!" (Frau Dr. actually originated that one!)

Not that there haven't been funny moments in the ritual itself but you'll have to sit on my side of the lodgeroom, and we can whisper about them while we're waiting for the stated meeting to begin.



posted on Sep, 19 2005 @ 11:02 PM
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Sounds exactly like a texas lodge.


I am quite found of the archaic language, and hope they do not modernize anything.



posted on Sep, 19 2005 @ 11:33 PM
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Damn I had just bookmarked a site on regalia but it didnt save! UGH so pissed it had Masonic antiques to I love that old stuff. There is no gadgets like Masonic gadgets do you agree? Anyway if someone has a link of the like please do indeed post.

Oh and tuxedos! Ugh I have seen lodges that are all in tuxes! I do not own one....yet :Z How many of you have to wear tuxes? I prefer suit/sportscoat or just prof. dress.



posted on Sep, 21 2005 @ 01:29 AM
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Oh found the link
www.phoenixmasonry.org...

There was another one with drawings/degrees I will post once I pull it up again. Let me know what you think of the above.

I would love to find one of those fold out key fobs or the fold out cane. Very nice stuff. I wish they still made products with such detail.



posted on Sep, 21 2005 @ 01:34 AM
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japike

If you're interested in regalia there's a lot of modern English regalia here.



posted on Sep, 21 2005 @ 01:43 AM
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Ahh great link Trinity! I will never get any sleep at this rate lol


Here is one of those FOBs I was talking about:
www.thefreemason.com...

Here is the old one better pic:
www.phoenixmasonry.org...

pyramid fob:
www.phoenixmasonry.org...

Cane:
www.phoenixmasonry.org...

Oh I see they have tracing boards to I like these:
www.thefreemason.com...


[edit on 21-9-2005 by japike]



posted on Sep, 21 2005 @ 06:36 AM
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I just counted five briefcases containing assorted regalia specific to different functions. I no longer bother with the custom of false bottoms to a multi-purpose briefcase, and some of these dusty things get little use!

BTW japike...

Mood is not Mood backwards, but Doom is.




posted on Sep, 22 2005 @ 12:29 AM
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if we dont dress ''business-casual'' (suit and tie and the like) we are not allowed into the lodge. It is also mandatory that we dress in black and white only. probably to fit with the tiles on the floor.



posted on Sep, 22 2005 @ 01:16 AM
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Bahaha I'm such an idiot! How in the heck did I do that? I really need to practice that rule of thumb measure twice cut once




Originally posted by MaskedAvatar
I just counted five briefcases containing assorted regalia specific to different functions. I no longer bother with the custom of false bottoms to a multi-purpose briefcase, and some of these dusty things get little use!

BTW japike...

Mood is not Mood backwards, but Doom is.




posted on Sep, 23 2005 @ 10:23 AM
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Originally posted by moonchild
if we dont dress ''business-casual'' (suit and tie and the like) we are not allowed into the lodge. It is also mandatory that we dress in black and white only. probably to fit with the tiles on the floor.

I must admit I've not heard that explanation before. In England we wear black ties to commemorate the fallen in World War I.



posted on Sep, 23 2005 @ 11:24 AM
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Originally posted by Trinityman

Originally posted by moonchild
if we dont dress ''business-casual'' (suit and tie and the like) we are not allowed into the lodge. It is also mandatory that we dress in black and white only. probably to fit with the tiles on the floor.

I must admit I've not heard that explanation before. In England we wear black ties to commemorate the fallen in World War I.


I find the word "probably" in his statement to be suspect...

Seems like if it was mandatory the symbolism or reason behind it would be explained. That's just me though.

It also seems, from my studies and conversations with Masons, that this sort of thing is at the discretion of the Worshipful Master; though a break with tradition is perhaps unlikely.

[edit on 9/23/05 by The Axeman]



posted on Sep, 23 2005 @ 05:42 PM
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But I suppose that each lodge votes on it. Although the grand lodge, or a master and officers might issue an edict.

Although a lot of people the master can do whatever he wants, he's actually quite constrained. Like most social system, there's checks and balances at work.

Personally, as I have written elsewhere, I think the idea of checks and balances in the US constitution has its origins in the lodgeroom. I believe that the United States was the first masonic republic. Texas may have been the second.




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