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Hurricane Rita ( Bad News For Gulf )

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posted on Sep, 20 2005 @ 05:48 PM
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Originally posted by dangermouse
Here ya' go Harry55, Katrina was the 3rd lowest pressure at landfall at 920 and the 4th lowest recorded Atlantic hurricane at 902.


Thanks I also found this WashingtonPost

National Hurricane Center cleared its throat and upgraded Katrina to a Category 5 hurricane -- the designation for storms capable of truly catastrophic damage and deadliness. That, however, wasn't the center's most significant statement. The real news was the center's chilling declaration that, at 902 millibars of internal barometric pressure -- the lowest barometric pressure ever recorded in the Gulf of Mexico -- Katrina was "comparable in intensity to Hurricane Camille of 1969 . . . only larger."

We forget how strong these storms are capable of getting. Lets hope Rita does not do the same.




posted on Sep, 20 2005 @ 05:58 PM
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Latest Satellite image of Rita:




Rita didn't live up to her billing in the Keys. She's intensifying on her way toward Texas. On ABC News at 7pm, they are predicting she will become a category 4 by the time she hits the Texas and Lousiana coasts.

[edit on 20-9-2005 by Mirlin11]



posted on Sep, 20 2005 @ 07:21 PM
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8 pm from NOAA

Moving toward west at 12 mph. Should maintain this direction the next 24 hrs. Sustained winds 105 mph. Strong cat 2 likely to become cat 3 are larger over next 24 hrs. Minimum central pressure now 969 mb.



posted on Sep, 20 2005 @ 07:27 PM
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She's definitely developing a distinct eye and somewhat overall symmetrical shape.



posted on Sep, 20 2005 @ 07:34 PM
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Latest hunter flight shows steady lowering pressure, now 967mb with 94kt/108mph winds and a closed eye formation.



posted on Sep, 20 2005 @ 08:03 PM
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I have been watching the BOUYS in the Gulf near Rita. The surface wind has been around 70 mph average gusts. If I am converting properly knots to mph. Kind of interesting to watch the reports come in and see what the storm is doing. You might want to check it out if you have not already. Waves, barometric pressure and wind speed. Just learning to do this.



posted on Sep, 20 2005 @ 08:16 PM
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Rita has a 27 mile wide eye...

Gulf of Mexico - AVN Color Enhanced Infrared Loop



posted on Sep, 20 2005 @ 08:21 PM
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Originally posted by Harry55
I have been watching the BOUYS in the Gulf near Rita. The surface wind has been around 70 mph average gusts. If I am converting properly knots to mph. Kind of interesting to watch the reports come in and see what the storm is doing. You might want to check it out if you have not already. Waves, barometric pressure and wind speed. Just learning to do this.


Yeah, those are cool and a good source of info. I've been also checking the Hurricane Hunter website to get the latest flight data.



posted on Sep, 20 2005 @ 08:27 PM
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I like the loop above better, wider view, but this one is nice too:

Floater - Rainbow Enhanced Infrared Loop


Model map:




posted on Sep, 20 2005 @ 08:43 PM
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Here is how I think its going to play out, she will be a 3, if she stays on the most southern path the stronger she will be. Each path north of the the most southern projected, weaker and weaker north.

A lot of the colder water from deeper in the gulf was churned by katrina close to NO and east of that. If Rita stays low she might be as big as katrina.

If there are more storms this season, no bigger than a 3. As if a 3 is little.



posted on Sep, 20 2005 @ 08:47 PM
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Psyopswatcher, They pretty well point to texas. If I was in that projected path I would be getting out soon. Can you imagine how many people there must be in that swath ? With Rita shaping up like it is this very possibly could be another once in a life time storm.



posted on Sep, 20 2005 @ 08:51 PM
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Joe Bastardi was on FOX, he said it would become a 5 and hit as 4 or 5 and would be the most powerful storm to hit that region in over 100 years. I wouldn't take this lightly, it really does look it could be another Katrina.

[edit on 9/20/2005 by djohnsto77]



posted on Sep, 20 2005 @ 08:55 PM
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With all the homeless and evacuated out of New Orleans and other Katrina hit areas where are all the folks in Texas going to retreat to ? This is going to be a big problem. I hope the goverment is ready for this one.



posted on Sep, 20 2005 @ 08:56 PM
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Originally posted by djohnsto77
Joe Bastardi was on FOX, he said it would become a 5 and hit as 4 or 5 and would be the most powerful storm to hit that region in over 100 years. I wouldn't take this lightly, it really does look it could be another Katrina.

[edit on 9/20/2005 by djohnsto77]


He seems to be one of the more accurate meteorologists out there, if I lived ANYWHERE on Texas coast I'd get out right now, tonight.



posted on Sep, 20 2005 @ 09:53 PM
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I just looked at the water vapor satelite of Rita and noticed the colors go off the chart. Also notice the color in the band that is hiting Miami Dade County this is where worldwatcher is at. We have not heard from her in a while and hope she is safe. Rita must be having some pour down rain in her outer bands. Parts of Fla. still getting pounded.



posted on Sep, 20 2005 @ 10:13 PM
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Well looks like the intensity forecasts were all severely underated.

A clear eye has appeared on IR imagery, and the radar appearance is that of a major hurricane (cat 3+). It appears this is another very dangerous situation facing the United States, zeroing in on Corpus Christi. There is nothing that will prevent Rita from becoming a category 4 or 5 hurricane in the Gulf of Mexico.

There is not expected to be any shear, dry air, and the slightly cooler waters of the western Gulf should not play much of a role.

Last visible satellite image of the day:


Note: Rita is much larger than was Katrina in this similar location, which means Rita may expand to a size similar to Katrina.

Tornado Watch for South Florida:
EFFECTIVE THIS TUESDAY AFTERNOON AND WEDNESDAY MORNING FROM 430 PM UNTIL 100 AM EDT.



www.spc.noaa.gov...



[edit on 20-9-2005 by Regenmacher]



posted on Sep, 20 2005 @ 10:43 PM
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If you are curious about the strength of Rita and what it could possibly build to please read the 11 pm disscussion at NOAA . This does not sound good. The storm projected tract has been moved some east. Chances of cat 5 is very good. Pressure is down and winds are up .11 pm report



posted on Sep, 20 2005 @ 10:57 PM
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Looking at the latest satellite image and radar from Key West I'm going to speculate that the 2am advisory will have this storm at cat 3 strength with 120mph winds. I also want to mention that with each passing run the models are shifting the storms track a little further right (east) each time. The BAMM model which posted at 8pm has the track into the very western end of LA. AVN which posted at 2pm has the storm going in at the very eastern edge of TX. Also the NHC is forecasting winds of 140mph in 72 hours. The odds seem very high that we will be looking at the 2nd major hurricane this year to hit a large city center.


cjf

posted on Sep, 20 2005 @ 11:02 PM
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I reside just west of Houston and persons in our neighborhood are taking the advisories seriously. Our local municipal government has issued warnings that sustained wind will be expected to reach 110+ mph in our immediate area should Rita make landfall as a cat 4 or strong cat 3. We experienced no flooding during Allison; but the probable winds are what most persons in my area are watching very closely.

I also have a house down on Bolivar Peninsula (Crystal Beach). The projected storm surge (if Rita lands where predicted) would wipe out our small community there. I have contacted some of the neighbors in our section which are full time residents and they are all moving out no later than Wednesday night. Interstate 45 inbound to Galveston will be closing in the morning for outbound traffic only and a mandatory general evacuation is expected to follow. Galveston and the surrounding areas, in my experience, are fairly proficient when facing these types of threats and transportation is organized for persons 'unable' to evacuate.


.



posted on Sep, 21 2005 @ 12:59 AM
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Rita goes to catagory 3

RITA BECOMES FIFTH MAJOR HURRICANE OF THE 2005 SEASON AS IT MOVES
WESTWARD AWAY FROM THE FLORIDA KEYS. MAXIMUM SUSTAINED
WINDS...115 MPH. MINIMUM CENTRAL PRESSURE... 960 MB....NHC

Category Three Hurricane: Winds 111-130 mph (96-113 kt or 178-209 km/hr)




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