It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

So Cydonia...

page: 1
0

log in

join
share:

posted on Sep, 18 2005 @ 08:51 AM
link   
As you all are no doubt aware,
, Cydonia is supposed to be a region of Mars that is rife with proof that Aliens once existed there.

Anyway, i was looking through some old pictures on my computer and came across some pictures. One was an artists impression of what Mars would look like with water, and another was, I think, a Topographical map of Mars.

I'm not sure exactly where Cydonia is located on Mars, but I had the thought,

Would Cydonia have actually been underwater when/if Mars once had oceans?

Just something I thought might be worth posting on here, see what people thought about it.




posted on Sep, 18 2005 @ 09:57 AM
link   
Underwater you say? Very interesting, this could be the deathblow for the whole Cydonia idea. It being underwater could indicate why the features look so out of place. Land formations that are under-water develop and erode differently then ones that were always on land resulting in some groovy formations, thus they look out of place. This can also indicate why the face sits in a basin, water flowing would create a ditch around it.

Can you link us to these images and topographic maps, if they are still available to you. If not I will go look for them myself (but if you link them they will save me a lot of time).



posted on Sep, 18 2005 @ 10:06 AM
link   

Originally posted by GoldEagle
Underwater you say? Very interesting, this could be the deathblow for the whole Cydonia idea.


Yeah right... Hoagland will just say that the beings that lived on Mars lived underwater then.


And yeah, if you have links to the topo maps, that would be great!



posted on Sep, 18 2005 @ 10:07 AM
link   
Perhaps something will come out of the news conference NASA is scheduling soon...
www.nasa.gov...

sorry...link works now...conference is scheduled for Sept 20/05

[edit on 18-9-2005 by masqua]

[edit on 18-9-2005 by masqua]



posted on Sep, 18 2005 @ 10:34 AM
link   
Thanks for posting


I'm not sure of the original links, as I found them via google, but I uploaded them to a site.

The first one is the pic of mars with water,

www.fawcettsoftware.com...

Next two are the topographics, ones like a whole planet stretched out flat, the other is the same portion of Mars as the picture above.

www.fawcettsoftware.com...

www.fawcettsoftware.com...

As I said, I wasn't sure where Cydonia was actually located, but I got the impression it was in the general area of the right most blue part in about the middle of the picture on the last link.



posted on Sep, 18 2005 @ 11:06 AM
link   
Earth is 70% underwater, and plenty of civilisation are around today,
maybe Cydonia was once underwater, but just as Earth changes geographically, would'nt Mars change also?

www.msss.com...



posted on Sep, 18 2005 @ 11:26 AM
link   
Mars doesnt have the benefit of plate tectonics that Earth has. So the geography would be not be altered too much. Erosion is the key factor in the surface development of Mars.

Mars' low gravity lead to it losing much of it's atmosphere and the heavier Carbon Dioxide remained. Water vapor also may have escaped into space.

My opinion, the location of Mars would have made it a cold, tundra wasteland planet even an billion years ago. No habitible for human life at all. New discoveries of Argon concentrations in the rocks of Mars may indicate that Mars has been cold for a very long time.



posted on Sep, 18 2005 @ 01:01 PM
link   
Check out this link if your interested in the geography of the Cydonia region on Mars: -Here-


The Past Environment of Cydonia

The morphology of the terraces seems to say much about the geologic environment of this area of Cydonia. The continuity of the terraces suggests that they may have been formed in part as erosional features and may reflect evidence of wave-cut benching. Since several of the terraces appear to encircle the central core of the landform, the landform may have been an "island" in the midst of a paleo-lake at some time in the Martian past and the landform may have been modified by both aerial and subaerial geologic processes. The identification of the four distinct terraces at varying elevations suggests that periods of regression and transgression occurred and that the lake was not a constant feature.


From what i know most of Cydonia, especially what is considered to be an ancient "city", is believed to have been an ancient shoreline, or 'island' which imo does give the "ancient city" idea some credence. Cydonia is very 'weird' geologically speaking and interesting to study...artificial or not, however i do tend to lean towards the latter tho.


But if you think the "face" is a strange anomoly check out "dolphin lake"

Also check out this page for more on the dolphin and Cydonia.


New evidence indicates that a substantial ocean once existed in Mars' northern hemisphere. Indeed, it's been theorized that the Cydonian "City" complex once sat on a shoreline, with the Face emerging as an artificial island. Surely the presence of a "dolphin" next to the Face invites inquiry.


Like i said artificial or not, it's very cool stuff.





[edit on 18-9-2005 by Rren]



posted on Sep, 18 2005 @ 04:24 PM
link   

Originally posted by GoldEagle

Mars doesnt have the benefit of plate tectonics that Earth has.



You might yet be right, Gold Eagle...but the jury isn't in on that just yet.



Nasa's Mars Global Surveyor has discovered surprising new evidence of past movement of the martian crust...

www.science.nasa.gov...



Also here:

www.sciencenews.org...

So far it is just 'evidence' since water works as a lubricant for plate movement, but, if there was a great deal of water on Mars at one time, then the evidence of tectonics will be substantiated.

[edit on 18-9-2005 by masqua]

[edit on 18-9-2005 by masqua]



posted on Sep, 18 2005 @ 08:27 PM
link   
I've always been interested in Cydonia. Thanks for the link to the dolphin lake Rren.
These two are really cool too.
Face 1
Looks like a Pharoh to me.

Just like how there was the face of Jesus on Google Maps, looks like there's the face of Jesus on Mars too.

Jesus



posted on Sep, 18 2005 @ 09:53 PM
link   

Originally posted by Nventual
Face 1
Looks like a Pharoh to me.


It's odd how you see a pharaoh and I see a coagulation of dark material on the surface of a the Martian tundra. Either I might have lost all my imagination for these things or what I see is purely natural. Honestly, you can see the surface features that indicate that environmental forces created the image. Our brains are tuned into looking for faces, it's a fact of our nature, that's why we see these things.

Also the Cydonia people use erosion to explain why there precious "Face of Mars" is in such unidentifiable shape in the high resolution images. They say that it was eroded away over a period of millions of years. Wouldn't erosion strong enough to make the "Face" unidentifiable, surely do away with the images on the surface a long time ago?

Look at the image at different angles or flip it upside down, would you notice it was a pharaoh then?



posted on Sep, 18 2005 @ 09:58 PM
link   

Originally posted by GoldEagle
Look at the image at different angles or flip it upside down, would you notice it was a pharaoh then?

No, but you can say that about alot of things man-made here on earth too that you see from the sky.



posted on Sep, 19 2005 @ 02:51 PM
link   
Here is a topographic map of Mars
antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov...

FYI the Cydonia region is about 40.8 N, 9.6 W and appears to be 3000-4000m altitude below the average. In order for it to be a "island" or shoreline area you would have to have a very specific water depth since the area is not on a steep slope. and the fact the objects in the Cydonia area are not much bigger also the fact taht the height of the Cydonia "face" mesa is only about 300 meters (which also covers an area 3000 meters wide) the "face" Mesa and any nearby "city" hills are not any more unusual then any other objects in the area, or other parts of the planet

THe only reason the Cydonia area has any intrest for people other then the Tharsiss bulge, Valles Marineris, or Hellas Planita, is because of the "face" the viking orbiter found. otherwise the area would not be reciveing such scrutiny

It is jsut a group of hills and mesas that had thier picture taken in less then ideal lighting which sharpend the shadows and edges to make it appear like it was something it was not

[edit on 9/19/2005 by Jehosephat]



posted on Sep, 19 2005 @ 03:20 PM
link   
You know, I bet if you took away all the cities, vegetation, water, and just left the bare Earth to be seen there would be some pretty interesting looking things too.


Not to mention a lot of the things Hoagland and other support comes from outdated pictures.



posted on Sep, 19 2005 @ 06:32 PM
link   
But there's a pyamid or two on Cydonia though with perfect sides.



posted on Sep, 19 2005 @ 06:41 PM
link   

Originally posted by GoldEagle
It's odd how you see a pharaoh and I see a coagulation of dark material on the surface of a the Martian tundra.


I went to the original photo and scrolled around and readily found the image there. The head looks pretty obvious, although anything below the neck (as was drawn in for the righthand pic) does not look like anything to me. I even see the eye, pupil, and eyelashes. To me it looks like the front of an "indian head penny" (although the model for that penny was not a real Indian but that's another topic).

Anyway, I make no claims this is manmade but it does look pretty cool. Thanks for posting it.



posted on Sep, 19 2005 @ 10:07 PM
link   
Excuse me if I am wrong, but doesn't current theory call the existance of oceans on mars into question?
Either way Hoagland IMO is grasping for straws on all of his theories.



posted on Sep, 19 2005 @ 10:22 PM
link   

Originally posted by Jorik

I'm not sure exactly where Cydonia is located on Mars, but I had the thought,



The Cydonia region of Mars is located at 41° north latitude, 10° west longitude on the red planet.

As for the ocean maps of mars those are far from the be all end all. They are just illustrating what Mars could have looked like today if it still had the massive amount of water researchers believe was present at its formation



new topics




 
0

log in

join