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You cant have or keep a gun here

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posted on Sep, 18 2005 @ 01:37 AM
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And how is it a God given right, TC??? In some countries, like the one I'm living in it's illegal to actually own a gun without a gun permit you know.

And in other countries it's illegal to own one period.




posted on Sep, 18 2005 @ 01:46 AM
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As I have said above, Im not saying you cannot own a gun. im saying that as a property owner I can restrict YOUr right to have such a weapon on MY property (Im a gun owner myself BTW) If you sign the rental contract, you are giving up the right to keep a gun on my property, not your right to own one. It just cannot be kept within the boundries of my land.

Okay everybody to the tune of "This land is"

"This my land is my land"
"It isnt your land"
"You can't keep a shotgun"
"Cause I don't want one"
"You signed a agreement"
"Its a legal co-on-tract"
"Violate it and I will evict you"



[edit on 9/18/05 by FredT]



posted on Sep, 18 2005 @ 01:56 AM
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Bandit, down through the centuries, nations have restricted God-given rights, this is nothing new. Especially firearms, as the government would never want to have to worry about the citizenry getting a belly-full and taking their country away from tyrants and arbitrary rulers, which is exactly why our Founding Fathers saw fit to add it to the Bill of Rights.

So, Fred, if you were my landlord, would you prevent me from uttering the word, "Shrubery?"



posted on Sep, 18 2005 @ 01:59 AM
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Originally posted by Thomas Crowne
So, Fred, if you were my landlord, would you prevent me from uttering the word, "Shrubery?"





Well it depends, are you refering to "Shrubery?" as in landscaping or a more biblical sence



posted on Sep, 18 2005 @ 06:21 AM
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Interesting thread a very American question. While the idea of banning guns in the likes of rental apartments is sound in theroy, in practice it could be tricky to enforce.
Are landlords going to search rooms for guns?

Besides it shouldnt bother Americans that they cant take guns into there homes after all the lease dosnt say anything about keeping a missile platform, tanks and other arms.
Drive that tank up your driveway , store those WMDs under your bed.
If any non american asks you why you need the arms tell them hand guns arent enough. You watched a person with hand gun get evicted from there home on TV .

Finaly it must be time to ask a question.
Why are your tax dollars still paying for the up keep of the US military?
After all every one has a private army in there backyard.


[edit on 18-9-2005 by xpert11]

[edit on 18-9-2005 by xpert11]



posted on Sep, 18 2005 @ 02:03 PM
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Originally posted by TheBandit795
Fred beat me to it. In the U.S. you have a right to bear arms. But you do not have that right on private property if the owner does not wish for you to bear arms.




Of course, property owners who forbid weapons are opening themselves to huge lawsuits. What if someone broke in to one of their tenants' apartments and killed that tenant--who, by the way, had NO means of defending themselves? That tenant, who, if they were allowed to have a gun, would still be alive?

I really hope someone brings up a lawsuit if something like this happens. That is just plain ridiculous!


As we all know, when guns are outlawed, only outlaws will have gun. You should be able to defend yourself!



posted on Sep, 19 2005 @ 06:04 AM
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Hypotethical situations.

Let me bring one here: What if a tenant shot his landlord, because the landlord raised the rent?

And why should there be lawsuits?? IF the tenant signed a contract, that means he AGREES that he's not going to have guns in the appartment. Period! If he didn't agree, he would look for another appartment. Or is the justice system there so screwed up that they're not going to look at a contract which the tenant signed??



posted on Sep, 19 2005 @ 06:24 AM
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If I wasn't deathly allergic to law enforcement I'd shoot my landlord.

My girlfriend's sister just bought into a community such as you're speaking of, they have odd rules such as only allowing white drapes in the windows. Although as far as I know I think the company that owns the development is limited in what it can do. I remember we were setting off fireworks and the worst threat we recieved was a lean against the house. I think a landlord's right to restrict your gun ownership is dependant on whether you're renting, or you actually bought into a community.

Here in New York City firearms are very strictly regulated, it pretty much goes that if you're not a cop you shouldn't have a gun. Limited carry permits are granted to armed security guards that allows them to carry the gun to and from their job. Everyone's obvious explaination for the restrictions is safety issues, but couldn't that be said for the rest of the coutnry as well? I sincerely doubt that NYC would turn into South Central LA jsut because we were allowed fire arms. The criminals already have them, the celebrities have them, the cops have them, the rich people have them, but us regular people are stuck with our Yankees souvenier baseball bats



posted on Sep, 19 2005 @ 06:31 AM
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Originally posted by Amethyst
Of course, property owners who forbid weapons are opening themselves to huge lawsuits. What if someone broke in to one of their tenants' apartments and killed that tenant--who,


Hypothetical alarmism. SO what if they are allowed to pack heat and still get broken into adn are still killed is the landlord still liable? No nor would he be in previous scenario as well.

But if the moon is full and there is a breeze out of the SW at 5 mph and your watching TV, and get broken into without a gun, you MIGHT have a case



posted on Sep, 19 2005 @ 06:40 AM
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If you think about it, it makes total sense for them to not allow this for at least two reasons.

First, if someone had an accidental discharge of a firearm in an apartment then the bullet is going to go through another person’s apartment.

Second reason why it makes sense is that the facility personnel in your apartment complex have the right to access your apartment in an emergency with no notice. Like if you are asleep and a pipe bursts and is flooding into another apartment. If they knock on your door and you sleep through it, and don’t answer, and wake up to find them in your place, they don’t want you to shoot them thinking they are burglars.



posted on Sep, 19 2005 @ 06:49 AM
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I ran into the "no guns" clause when I moved into university housing in graduate school. And the clause stated not keeping one in your car, either.

I stored my guns in a you-store-it place that held guns for campus hunters.

But I had recieved a can of mace from the LO agency where I worked. It was professional grade, and could shoot a pencil thin stream of mace 50 ft. So I kept THAT in case some maintenance man came through to "stumble" upon my weapons cache.

Of course now I'm a giant sized dwarf of a bourgiouse capitalist oppressor, with my own micro-fiefdom, which is armed like a prison-camp.

So I don't care about this anymore.



posted on Sep, 19 2005 @ 07:19 AM
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Well, why don't they ban baseball bats too, because they can be every bit as lethal! Or pepper spray. Or a chair--you can nail someone with a chair.

I would NOT move anywhere where someone would make me sign away my Second Amendment rights to live there! Maybe everyone ought to take a cue here and not rent from people who do not allow guns.

It wouldn't be that hard, either. I've heard it's pretty hard to rent out nowadays.

This weapons banning comes from plain ignorance IMO. Not everyone who owns a gun has an itchy trigger finger!



posted on Sep, 19 2005 @ 07:27 AM
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DC isn't a state and therefore the residents don't have certain rights.
One of those rights denied them is the right to own a gun. Also,
guns are not allowed in schools and hospitals. (except law enforcement).

I don't know if apartments, or housing areas, can make rules that
go against your constitutional rights. Hmmmm ... it's an interesting
question. Wonder what the lawyers could do with it?



posted on Sep, 19 2005 @ 07:28 AM
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Well maybe because there are more steps and a closer range involved with picking up a chair and getting into swinging range to hit someone, as opposed to pulling something from next to the bed and firing it. Then there is the fact that a baseball bat, chair, and pepperspray are essentially much less lethal, and don’t penetrate walls into your neighbor’s apartment.



posted on Sep, 19 2005 @ 07:44 AM
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Im mostly liberal, but wehn it comes to firearms, im in the conservitive tent.

I do not think a landlord should be able to infrenge on our 2 amendment.

We have the rights to own guns in the US, and im not going to let some simple minded landlord stop me.

II Amendment is as follows:

" well regulated Militia, being necessary to the security of a free State, the right of the people to keep and bear Arms, shall not be infringed."

-Jared



posted on Sep, 19 2005 @ 07:48 AM
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But at what point does your right to have a firearm overlap the rights of your neighbors and your complexes workers rights to Life, Liberty and the pursuit of happiness . When bits of lead get unjustly slung their way?



posted on Sep, 19 2005 @ 08:34 AM
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The main problem that I see with FredT's arguement is that I am paying you rent for the use of said property. The lease that I sign gives me certain rights as well. I would be interested in how this would stand up in a court of law (a real court California doesn't count). I also wonder what your view on this would be if the prospective tennant is a police officer or FBI agent. If I rented off of you and signed the lease agreeing to not owning a firearm and then had one any way I don't think that it could be used for grounds to evict me. Now what you could do would be to refuse to renew the lease when it expired.



posted on Sep, 19 2005 @ 08:49 AM
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Originally posted by FredT
As I have said above, Im not saying you cannot own a gun. im saying that as a property owner I can restrict YOUr right to have such a weapon on MY property (Im a gun owner myself BTW) If you sign the rental contract, you are giving up the right to keep a gun on my property, not your right to own one. It just cannot be kept within the boundries of my land.

Okay everybody to the tune of "This land is"

"This my land is my land"
"It isnt your land"
"You can't keep a shotgun"
"Cause I don't want one"
"You signed a agreement"
"Its a legal co-on-tract"
"Violate it and I will evict you"



[edit on 9/18/05 by FredT]




If you won't allow others to own guns on your property, why do you feel the need to own one?

Strikes me as a touch elitist....



posted on Sep, 19 2005 @ 08:55 AM
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but a basic tenet of contract law is that making ANY agreement that binds you to ANYTHING is a decision to alienate your OWN rights.

Marriage is an excellent example where you enter an agreement and knowingly forsake rights you otherwise had.

The court assumes that adults don't enter into agreements that don't serve their own interests.

You have a right to property. But when you enter into an agreement to sell your home, you by definition are trading away your rights.

Any court in the 50 will tell you that if you don't like the terms, then don't sign it until you negotiate the ones you want.

The reason for special laws about renting to minorities is because, other than THOSE laws, it's the landlord's right to set the rules--a right that HE'S not about to sign away.

It surprises me that more of you can't grasp this.

You have a right to free speech, mkay? but you don't have a right to go up to a CNN reporter and start talking into his microphone. You don't have a right to demand that the Networks air the new sitcom you've written. And why not? Because your rights do not trump someone else's property rights, unless they sign a contract with you concerning those rights.

How hard is that?

No one compels you to rent from this landlord, and no other. When I lived in a "gun-free" apt., it was a choice I made. I could have decided to live off campus, or I could have decided not to go to college on those terms. See?



posted on Sep, 19 2005 @ 09:35 AM
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What I'm saying is, you're in MORE danger living in a gun-free complex. Why? Because people who break the law don't have any qualms against violating a lease by having a gun.

How hard is this to figure out?
You live in a "gun-free" area you're asking to be attacked, because criminals LOVE unarmed victims!



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