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Scottish rite Age for degrees?

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posted on Sep, 16 2005 @ 12:11 PM
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Hi,

I was on the local Scottish Rite lodge's website and mentioned you had to be 33 years of age. Is this for 33 degree only?

I am not worried about 33 but I am concerned about 4 and up..No one is ever home at these lodges when I call ;p

Here is exactly what I read:



The Scottish Rite of Freemasonry is an extension of the first three degrees
of Craft Freemasonry. Here the member witnesses degrees from the 4°
through the 32°. Each degree provides a moral lesson that can help the member
be a better person. The 33° is conferred annually upon a select number of 32° Scottish
Rite Masons who have contributed outstanding service to Freemasonry or Scottish Rite
or who have exemplified in their daily lives, the true meaning of the Brotherhood of Man
under the Fatherhood of God. A recipient must be at least 33 years of age and may not
apply for the degree.



[edit on 16-9-2005 by japike]




posted on Sep, 16 2005 @ 12:56 PM
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The age requirement for the 4° - 32° is the same as the Grand Lodge of the jurisdiction in which the Scottish Rite Temple exists. For example, if the Grand Lodge of Iowa allows 18 year olds to become Masons, then Scottish Rite organizations in Iowa also would admit 18 year olds. If the Grand Lodge of Alabama required candidates to be 21, Alabama Scottish Rite organizations would also require 21.

The only universal requirement is at least 33 years old for the 33°.



posted on Sep, 17 2005 @ 10:34 AM
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Thanks for clearing that upf or me. Also I got thrown off by this statement they(Scottish Rite Grand Lodge) made

"Once you receive the mandatory 4 degrees you are considered a 32 degree Mason."

Unless they are reffering to grouping a set of degrees together I am lost? Any idea?

Thanks again.



posted on Sep, 18 2005 @ 04:35 AM
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Could be a typo - there are 14 manditory or (significant) degrees in the Scottish Rite and the 32nd Degree is a revision of them all.

www.freemasonry101.org.uk...

Or they could be just plain lying to you.



posted on Sep, 19 2005 @ 07:56 AM
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Originally posted by japike
Thanks for clearing that upf or me. Also I got thrown off by this statement they(Scottish Rite Grand Lodge) made

"Once you receive the mandatory 4 degrees you are considered a 32 degree Mason."

Unless they are reffering to grouping a set of degrees together I am lost? Any idea?



There are actually five mandatory degrees: the 4°, 14°, 18°, 30°, and 32°. In classes where the candidates go from 4° - 32° in one day, these are usually the only degrees that are conferred.

I should point out that this is true in the USA only. In the UK, the only mandatory degree is the 18°.



posted on Sep, 19 2005 @ 11:39 AM
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Thanks for the info guys.

Did at one point in history a Mason have to obtain all degrees? I know that the one day thing is new but never knew it was done in the Scottish Rite.



posted on Sep, 19 2005 @ 12:16 PM
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Originally posted by japike
Thanks for the info guys.

Did at one point in history a Mason have to obtain all degrees? I know that the one day thing is new but never knew it was done in the Scottish Rite.


It's actually pretty much always been done like that in the Scottish Rite. When the Scottish Rite was first founded in 1801, they would simply give a cover obligation to the candidate; this "covered" all the degrees from the 4° - 32°. They would then be presented with the written rituals for study, and become a 32° Scottish Rite Mason by proclamation. Albert Pike himself was initiated in this manner, and went from being a Third Degree Master Mason to a 32° Scottish Rite Mason in about 5 minutes while sitting in Dr. Albert Mackey's study.

Nevertheless, after Pike became Grand Commander, he had a vision of actually conferring the degrees in a ceremonial fashion. He revised them several times in order to improve their teachings; while he did this, he also created several dramatic masterpieces, and the degrees slowly began to be conferred in a ceremonial iniatiatory setting.

Today, Scottish Rite Temples are required to at least confer the 5 mandatory degrees, but many Temples also confer many more. The Temple in Guthrie, Oklahoma confers all 32 degrees in full form, but they also offer one day classes where only the 5 mandatory degrees are conferred.



posted on Sep, 20 2005 @ 12:43 AM
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Ah very good! Thank you kindly. I Love your detail!

Where you from Masonic Light? You would be a very good brain to pick



posted on Sep, 20 2005 @ 01:08 AM
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masonic is it true that freemasonry is alot like babylonian witchraft?



posted on Sep, 20 2005 @ 06:31 PM
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Originally posted by Masonic Light
The Temple in Guthrie, Oklahoma confers all 32 degrees in full form, but they also offer one day classes where only the 5 mandatory degrees are conferred.






Does that mean ML that they have two separate groups? I was talking to someone in CO- Masonry the other day and they said they go through each degree the long way so to speak, in fact I believe they said you have to take your first three degrees over if you have gone through a regular lodge of such.



posted on Sep, 21 2005 @ 07:52 AM
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Originally posted by TgSoe
Does that mean ML that they have two separate groups?



No, it's the same group, the Valley of Guthrie, Orient of Oklahoma. They give candidates the option of receiving each degree in long form or taking only the mandatory degrees in a one day class.



I was talking to someone in CO- Masonry the other day and they said they go through each degree the long way so to speak, in fact I believe they said you have to take your first three degrees over if you have gone through a regular lodge of such.


Yes. Co-Masonry isn't really Masonry, and they do not recognize the first three degrees of Masonry as a part of their organizations.



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