Steps of Freemasonry Illustration Origin

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posted on Sep, 16 2005 @ 06:44 AM
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Can any one on these boards tell me where this illustration is from?



It’s available as a poster, but it must have originated in a book.

Thanks in advanced.




posted on Sep, 16 2005 @ 06:57 AM
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Ok, I've found the picture with higher resolution for those who might find it interesting:

www.shawneemasoniclodge54.com...

(the same, as on the following post
)

What's that building on the background, temple of solomon? For me its entrance somewhat resembles what I've seen in the pictures of the Supreme Council building in US. Couldn't read the full name, but the picture seems to be drawn by 32degreee mason.

Those two highest degree masons standing on the top of the steps could present an all-seeing eye. And that blue masonic symbol they are holding - it seems to symbolize the top of the pyramid. Nice picture


[edit on 16-9-2005 by The Conspiracy Follower]



posted on Sep, 16 2005 @ 07:04 AM
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Sorry Conspiracy Follower, I should've provided a link:

www.shawneemasoniclodge54.com...

Its 2145 x 1419 pixels, I hope that high enough for you.



posted on Sep, 16 2005 @ 10:03 AM
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Originally posted by ConspiracyNut23
Can any one on these boards tell me where this illustration is from?



It was originally published in an article about Masonry in Life Magazine back in the '50's. I have the poster too, they're available from Macoy.



posted on Sep, 16 2005 @ 10:58 AM
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Also seen here on one of my local lodges

See also of intrest: emblematic structure of freemasonry
www.thebluecoats.org...



posted on Sep, 16 2005 @ 11:19 AM
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from freemasonry.bcy.ca...

"The Structure of Freemasonry." Life. vol. 41, no. 15. 8 October 1956. Time Inc., Chicago. [from a painting by Everett Henry] printed size: 21" x 14".



Finally!
Thanks ML that was a very good lead, but unfortunately since the poster is titled "Steps Of Freemasonry" I couldn’t find it.

However, jagpike’s scan from his lodge reveals the title used in the Life Article," Structure of Freemasonry”" . A google search quickly uncovered the article. BTW there’s a 5.5 MB version of the illustration available here.

And Follower it is indeed Solomon's Temple...



Thanx guys.


I wonder why they changed the temple for the poster? Does anyone recognize the temple in the Life illustration?

Edit: for clarity

[edit on 16/9/05 by ConspiracyNut23]



posted on Sep, 16 2005 @ 11:38 AM
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Originally posted by The Conspiracy Follower
Those two highest degree masons standing on the top of the steps could present an all-seeing eye.

I'd think that giant flying all seeing eye with the G for Geometry would represent the all seeing eye.

I'm curious as to why the men next to the colum on the left are middle aged-younger, and the men around the column on the right are older. I know that the colums are supposed to represent some aspect or virtue or another, wonder if its saying that one is a youthful virtue and the other is one that comes with old age?? Can't help but wonder why the all seeing eye is on the York rite side and the volume of presumably sacred law (or is it the bible that usually has the square and compass on it?) is associated with the scottish rite side either.


Are there no other major appendant bodies within regular masonry than these two??


Seems like the picture is unbalanced, since Kings Hiram and Solomon are on different levels, or at least its not symmetric anyways.

[edit on 16-9-2005 by Nygdan]



posted on Sep, 16 2005 @ 11:50 AM
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Here is the Life Magazine illustration for those who wich to compare the two.

Life Magazine

external image

Poster: (from above)



Interesting observations Nygdan.



[edit on 16/9/05 by ConspiracyNut23]



posted on Sep, 16 2005 @ 12:48 PM
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Cut away of Solomon's Temple:
www.irr.org...

If direct image link above doesnt work here is the page its on:
www.irr.org...

Any takes on the other building?



posted on Sep, 18 2005 @ 01:03 AM
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Another interseting thing is that the Time Life pic has the library of alexandria, rather than solomon's temple.



posted on Sep, 18 2005 @ 05:28 AM
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This structure pretty much confirms my understanding of the hierachy of US Freemasonry.
It seems to imply that the York (American) Rite is appendent to the Scottish Rite although all FellowCrafts are received into it.
I'd say the placement of items like the book of law etc... are purely for aesthetic purposes as the All Seeing Eye appears to be on par with the 33rd Degree which is not correct (The Royal Secret is attained in the 32nd Degree.)

Good to finally see a diagram with The Shriners on it - confirms what GadFly told me (that it is equivilent to a "Lodge of Perferction" but with physical hazing and an Oriental/Mystic theme.)



posted on Sep, 19 2005 @ 03:57 PM
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Originally posted by MrNECROS
imply that the York (American) Rite is appendent to the Scottish Rite

??? Er, how? They are both shown as stemming from the same branching point, the 3rd Degree. How is York appendant to Scottish here??



posted on Sep, 20 2005 @ 09:28 AM
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No they aren't - there is no stepping stone from "Master Mason" onto the York Rite side of the pyramid.
The Scottish Rite begins at the 1st Degree and finishes at the 32nd (or 33rd depending on how you look at it.)
Just ask Pike or McClenechan...or anyone really.

It's only in the US that the York Rite has any significance at all (and Mexico of all places I believe...) It's not even recognised in Europe as far as I'm aware, it appears to be a "dead branch" that was formed in the new world but dwindled into obscurity soon afterwards (Both Pike and McClenechan say that it was being phased out during their day...over 100 years ago.)



posted on Sep, 20 2005 @ 11:22 AM
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What are you talking about? There are three steps, then a step for the 4th degree in the scottish rite, and on the same level a step for the Mark Master of the York Rite.



posted on Sep, 20 2005 @ 11:41 AM
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Originally posted by MrNECROS

It seems to imply that the York (American) Rite is appendent to the Scottish Rite although all FellowCrafts are received into it.


What are you on about now? The York and Scottish Rites are completely independant of one another, and you have to be a Master Mason to join either of them. The York Rite is alive and well, I assure you.


Good to finally see a diagram with The Shriners on it - confirms what GadFly told me (that it is equivilent to a "Lodge of Perferction" but with physical hazing and an Oriental/Mystic theme.)


The Shrine was created as a sort of parody; a place where Masons could meet as Masons without all the somberness of the lodge... have some fun, have some drinks, etc.


www.shrinershq.org...

In 1870, several thousand of the 900,000 residents of Manhattan were Masons. Many of these Masons made it a point to lunch at the Knickerbocker Cottage, a restaurant at 426 Sixth Avenue. At a special table on the second floor, a particularly jovial group of men used to meet regularly.

The Masons who gathered at this table were noted for their good humor and wit. They often discussed the idea of a new fraternity for Masons, in which fun and fellowship would be stressed more than ritual. Two of the table regulars, Walter M. Fleming, M.D., and William J. Florence, an actor, took the idea seriously enough to do something about it.



posted on Sep, 20 2005 @ 02:00 PM
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Originally posted by Nygdan
What are you talking about? There are three steps, then a step for the 4th degree in the scottish rite, and on the same level a step for the Mark Master of the York Rite.



You are absolutely correct, and (of course) Necros is absolutely in error.

Aside from Necros' misstatement, which is in all probability an intentional one anyway, the terms "York Rite" and "Scottish Rite" are sometimes misunderstood.

The York Rite is, in effect, "original" Freemasonry, and is the most common form of Freemasonry. It is called "York Rite" because the Regius Manuscript refers to it being founded in York, England in the early middle ages.

Originally, the York Rite consisted of only two degrees (Entered Apprentice and Fellow Craft). Eventually, the degree of Master Mason was added to the system in the early 1700's.

After this, several "side degrees" developed, along with the Royal Arch Degree, although the Royal Arch was originally conferred in a very primitive version as part of the Master Mason degree. The United Grand Lodge of England has officially stated that "pure, antient Masonry consists of only three Degrees, viz., Entered Apprentice, Fellow Craft, and Master Mason, which includes the Supreme Order of the Holy Royal Arch".

Around the same time, Lodges of Mark Master Masons began popping up in England, and a Grand Mark Lodge now has jurisdiction over them. The Order of Knights Templar was, at this time, conferred in Blue Lodges.

This has caused a great deal of confusion over terminology here in the states. Pike and Mackey (rightly, in my opinion), considered "York Rite" to consist only of the three Blue Lodge degrees, while they called the degrees conferred by the Chapter, Council, and Commandery "American Rite". The American is grafted onto the York Rite in the United States in systematic sequences, while these degrees belong to disassociate bodies in the UK.

However, common usage in the US is that the Chapters, Councils, and Commanderies are "York Rite" proper, and they will probably continue to be called that forevermore.

The Scottish Rite, on the other hand, is a system of 33 degrees that was founded in the US in 1801. Although it has its own version of the first three degrees, they are not worked. Instead, those who are Master Masons in the York Rite will join the Scottish Rite beginning at its own 4°. It is in this sense that the Scottish Rite is appendant to the York Rite (and not the other way around, as Necros falsely claims).

Master Masons in good standing may continue in the York Rite by applying for admission into a Chapter of Royal Arch Masons, or they may apply for admission into the Scottish Rite beginning at the 4°, or they may do both, or they may do neither.



posted on Sep, 20 2005 @ 02:05 PM
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^^^

Or that.



posted on Sep, 21 2005 @ 02:35 PM
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Originally posted by Nygdan
Another interseting thing is that the Time Life pic has the library of alexandria, rather than solomon's temple.


How do you know? I can't find any illustration of the great library. Only the new one they build in its place and the interior from some Sagan movie.



posted on Sep, 21 2005 @ 03:30 PM
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Originally posted by Masonic Light
The Scottish Rite, on the other hand, is a system of 33 degrees that was founded in the US in 1801.

? I thought it was largely made by Knight Ramsay in France??

Master Masons in good standing may continue in the York Rite by applying for admission into a Chapter of Royal Arch Masons, or they may apply for admission into the Scottish Rite beginning at the 4°, or they may do both, or they may do neither.

Are these different physical buildings, or is it all confluent with the local lodge?

conspiracy nut
How do you know?

Aplogies, I'm an idiot, i mean its the Pharos, the lighthouse of alexandria, or at the least looks like a lighthouse to me and that woudl be keeping in the mythic/wisdom motif. Interestingly that the book is on the pharos side, and is illuminated from below by it.



posted on Sep, 21 2005 @ 03:52 PM
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Originally posted by Nygdan

? I thought it was largely made by Knight Ramsay in France??


Ramsay is credited with being the first Mason to claim that Masonry is derived from orders of chivalry in the Crusades, but there is no evidence that Ramsay himself held any degrees besides the first three. His theory, however, inspired the creation of hundreds of new degrees.

The Scottish Rite was formed in 1801 when 11 York Rite Masons organized the first Supreme Council 33° in Charleston, South Carolina, electing John Mitchell as first Grand Commander. The 33 degrees they used were a combination taken from 3 French Rites which they had various patents for.



Are these different physical buildings, or is it all confluent with the local lodge?


Usually, the Scottish Rite organizations own their own Temples. These are generally larger buildings with large auditoriums, dining halls, libraries, etc. Usually, the words "Scottish Rite Temple" are engraved somewhere on the front of the building, along with the Double-Headed Eagle.

Smaller Lodge buildings usually only host Blue Lodges (the Blue Lodge name and number will be seen on the building's sign). Medium-sized buildings whose signs simply read "Masonic Temple" usually have both a Blue Lodge and York Rite bodies who meet there.





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