It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Apple Xserve G5 and Xserve RAID

page: 1
0

log in

join
share:

posted on Sep, 13 2005 @ 10:32 PM
link   
Apple updated their Xserve G5, Xserve RAID, and Xserve Cluster Nodes today.

Talk about some sweet gear!

www.apple.com...








[edit on 13-9-2005 by FallenFromTheTree]




posted on Sep, 13 2005 @ 10:49 PM
link   
Indeed man very space age Hal 9000 would be proud of what his little brothers have grown up to be. Seeing that multiple terrabytes of hdd space amazes me in some ways. I remember when a 1gb hdd cost roughly as much as the average kids first car lol.



posted on Sep, 13 2005 @ 11:04 PM
link   
16 GIGS of RAM...thats amazing, I remember hearing a quote from Bill Gates that no one would ever need more than 2 or 3 megs of RAM. I am glad to see that Apple is putting more thought into their computers for once instead of falling into the never ending cycle of iPods.



posted on Sep, 13 2005 @ 11:38 PM
link   
This is obviously their serious top of the line gear for number crunching
and render farms but just for jolleys, I maxed out a custom built configuration on one
of deez schweet machines.



Specifications

Dual 2.3GHz PowerPC G5
16GB DDR400 ECC SDRAM - 8x2GB
1500GB ADM (3x500GB 7,200rpm ADM)
SuperDrive (CD-RW/DVD-R)
Hardware RAID PCI card - (lower slot)
Fibre Channel PCI-X card (upper slot)
Xserve RAID (14x500GB)
Mac OS X Server, Unlimited License
Mac OS X Server Maintenance 36 Mths Unl. Client (Single Server), price per server
AppleCare Service Parts Kit for Xserve G5
AppleCare Premium Service and Support for Xserve
No video card

Subtotal $34,496 USD

Will they take a check?


Mac OS X Server v 10.4 unlimited client edition $999.00
www.apple.com...


XSAN $999.00 per node
www.apple.com...
High-Performance Storage Networking
Xsan version 1.1 takes advantage of the 64-bit file system in Mac OS X v10.4 “Tiger” — so users in your organization can share files and volumes up to two petabytes (2PB) in size. Dozens of systems on the SAN can read and write to shared storage simultaneously, unlike other solutions which gate access at the volume level. Even better, using a SAN lets you pool data across multiple RAID devices for better performance, while each client can access this centralized data as if connected directly to it. And by connecting users directly to a high-speed Fibre Channel network, Xsan eliminates the need to transfer files over slower Ethernet-based networks. Using Fibre Channel multipathing, in which two Fibre Channel cables connect a computer to the SAN, an Xsan client can theoretically achieve throughput of up to 400MBps, perfect for multiple editors working on a video project or a compute cluster that needs fast access to data to ensure each node crunches at full capacity.



posted on Sep, 14 2005 @ 12:16 AM
link   

Originally posted by The_Final
16 GIGS of RAM...thats amazing, I remember hearing a quote from Bill Gates that no one would ever need more than 2 or 3 megs of RAM. I am glad to see that Apple is putting more thought into their computers for once instead of falling into the never ending cycle of iPods.


I have heard of that quote from bill gates and its actually 640k's of ram though.



posted on Sep, 14 2005 @ 12:28 AM
link   



posted on Sep, 14 2005 @ 12:36 AM
link   

Originally posted by tarzan
I have heard of that quote from bill gates and its actually 640k's of ram though.


Thats good that somone remember, but still I still think that the point was made that "a long time ago" no one thought that we would need such things. Yea I wasn't sure about the actually number. Thanks for the clarificaiton



posted on Sep, 14 2005 @ 12:38 AM
link   

Originally posted by tarzan

Originally posted by The_Final
16 GIGS of RAM...thats amazing, I remember hearing a quote from Bill Gates that no one would ever need more than 2 or 3 megs of RAM. I am glad to see that Apple is putting more thought into their computers for once instead of falling into the never ending cycle of iPods.


I have heard of that quote from bill gates and its actually 640k's of ram though.




In all honesty, Apple charges insane prices for their RAM.

In the above cluster that 16GB RAM is priced at $11,600

You can find 16GB (8 X 2GB ) of Corsair PC3200 ecc RAM for $5296 on pricewatch.



posted on Sep, 14 2005 @ 12:52 AM
link   

Originally posted by The_Final

Originally posted by tarzan
I have heard of that quote from bill gates and its actually 640k's of ram though.


Thats good that somone remember, but still I still think that the point was made that "a long time ago" no one thought that we would need such things. Yea I wasn't sure about the actually number. Thanks for the clarificaiton


yeah it was from 91 i googled but cant find the full article but did cut and paste some famous tech quotes

Famous technology quotes

"Who in their right mind would ever need more than 640 K of RAM?" (Bill Gates, 1981)
"Computers in the future may weigh no more than 1.5 tons." (Popular Mechanics, 1949)
"I think there is a world market for maybe five computers." (Thomas Watson, chairman of IBM, 1943)
"There is no reason anyone would want a computer in their home." (Ken Olson, president, chairman and founder of Digital Equipment Corp., 1977)
"Everything that can be invented has been invented." (Charles H. Duell, Commissioner, U.S. Office of Patents, 1899)



posted on Sep, 14 2005 @ 01:56 AM
link   


When the Hypersonic Missile Technology (HMT) team at COLSA Corporation and the U.S. Army need to model hypersonic flight on a computer system, they’ll no longer have to wait two months to get results.

The HMT team, headed by senior scientist Dr. John Medeiros, now has access to one of the world’s largest and most powerful computers: a supercluster of 1,566 64-bit, dual-processor Apple Xserve G5 servers.

Called MACH5 — an acronym for Multiple Advanced Computers for Hypersonics — the Apple cluster “gives us more than 60 times the computational power of our current production machine,” says Medeiros. What used to take two months can now be done in a day.

“A single person using a hand-held calculator — without pausing to eat or sleep — would need more than two million years to calculate what the Apple supercluster can calculate in a single second.”

”Once you have that kind of computational power,” Medeiros adds, “you can look at things with higher resolution and see other problems you want to investigate. Plus you can tackle much larger problems.”

25+ Teraflops
Medeiros and the COLSA team chose the Xserve-based supercluster to model the complex aero-thermodynamics of hypersonic flight for the Research, Development and Engineering Command (RDECOM) of the U.S. Army at nearby Redstone Arsenal. Working with the COLSA team, Drs. Billy Walker and Kevin Kennedy of RDECOM conduct leading-edge analysis of hypersonic flight for a number of important military programs.

At its peak, the supercluster can exceed 25 teraflops — calculating more than 25 trillion floating-point operations per second. By comparison, the world’s fastest computer — NEC’s $350 million Earth Simulator — runs at a peak speed of 40 teraflops. A single person using a hand-held calculator — without pausing to eat or sleep — would need more than two million years to calculate what the Apple supercluster can calculate in a single second.

ENIAC


inventors.about.com...
The ENIAC contained 17,468 vacuum tubes, along with 70,000 resistors, 10,000 capacitors, 1,500 relays, 6,000 manual switches and 5 million soldered joints. It covered 1800 square feet (167 square meters) of floor space, weighed 30 tons, consumed 160 kilowatts of electrical power. There was even a rumor that when turned on the ENIAC caused the city of Philadelphia to experience brownouts, however, this was first reported incorrectly by the Philadelphia Bulletin in 1946 and since then has become an urban myth.


UNIVAC
en.wikipedia.org...

In 1968 you could pick up a 1.3 MHz CPU with half a megabyte of RAM and 100 megabyte hard drive for a mere US$1.6 million. Oh, and you want a printer too...?
UNIVAC I used 5,200 vacuum tubes



posted on Sep, 15 2005 @ 09:25 PM
link   
The next 2 years are going to be very interesting.

This goes for average home users, small business and the enterprise.

The hardware in all platforms is moving to dual core processors with far more efficiency
and lower energy demands.

The multi-billion dollar question will be what to buy and when.

Unix based Mac OS X and Linux vs. Microsoft Vista

I know where I'd put my money if my career depended on security and stability.



posted on Sep, 16 2005 @ 09:39 AM
link   
Yeah, it's going to be very interesting. I'm wondering what the big benefit of Vista over XP will be. I dont think many companies will migrate to Vista within the first two or three years. Switching over to Vista also means buying new hardware, or at least a RAM upgrade for every workstation in most cases.

Linux has improved a lot, the last couple of years. Unfortunately, its still not as user friendly as XP.



posted on Sep, 16 2005 @ 10:08 AM
link   
still waaaay too slow for me



posted on Sep, 16 2005 @ 11:26 PM
link   
I've used XP and I've used Mac OS X, but never had the patience to try Linux.

Mac OSX is far more user friendly than XP by leaps and bounds with ZERO viruses, ZERO Adware or Spyware and far more stable.

As you can see from the links above, more and more big league users are discovering
the benefits of OS X and very pleased with the results.



posted on Sep, 17 2005 @ 12:46 PM
link   
Believe it or not most distros of Linux now install with the same easy graphical user interface "GUI" that most others such as OS X and XP have. I really encourage you to take a gander over to linux. Did I mention they are all free, as well as the thousands of free software programs?

www.debian.org...
www.slackware.com...



posted on Sep, 17 2005 @ 02:33 PM
link   
Apple have this quite intersting video about ther use in science on there site
Here



posted on Sep, 17 2005 @ 04:21 PM
link   
There are indeed many very well written distros of Linux written with great care
and consideration by many gifted programers.
Far more gifted than myself.
It is also wonderful that most can be used on nearly any hardware.
I imagine that as time goes on they will also continue grow in use and contribute
to the needs of many users.
Many of these Linux distros are individual applications meant to add functions to the
operating system, but unless the application and the operating system are both optimized
together for the hardware, this is where you run into compatibility and stablilty conflicts.
Even so, I would still prefer Linux over Microsoft's current offering.

The benefit of OS X is that it has taken the best features of open source UNIX and BSD
and put it together in a remarkably beautiful and easy to use interface with features, stability
and security that are frankly second to none.
Each individual application and the primary OS are fully optimized for the user's hardware.
The number of free and shareware applications for OSX is also growing by leaps and bounds
almost daily as more creative programers join the ranks of other developers.
Very much like Linux, the Mac community is continuously involved in the review and improvement
of these offerings.

Even the most seasoned Mac users know that Microsoft Office for Mac is still needed
in many working environments.
Fortunately the Mac version is seemlessly compatible and even
easier to use than the P/C version.

Many Mac users eagerly await Open Office 2 and there is also growing interest in NeoOffice.

Apple's iWork suite offers "Pages" for desktop publishing and "Keynote" which many users report
as far superior to Microsoft Powerpoint.

FileMaker Pro is the leading database and project management suite.

FileMaker now can import directly from Microsoft Excel's native XLS file format, making it easier to
slurp in data from existing spreadsheets. It can, if you wish, create a new table and fields from the
imported data. Version 8 can also export data to XLS files and report to PDF files. The program also
includes a mail-merge capability that lets you send customized batches of e-mails easily (though
the resulting e-mails are text-only, not HTML)."

www.pcmag.com...

The point is that both the Mac community and the Linux community can't wait to
leave Microsoft Office and the Windows operating system in the dust.



posted on Sep, 21 2005 @ 09:15 AM
link   
While the Xserves are pretty hot, you'll never find an Apple branded server in my NOC.

(before i get flamed here - i am a longtime apple geek. i cut my teeth on various apple 2 systems back in the day and use a PowerBook as my main laptop. I also do some random video work on my trusty G4 in my spare time
)

Basically if i'm going to be spending that much money on a server, give me Sun gear. To me, Solaris and the SPARC platform is feild tested and feild proven. OSX (while based on BSD and Mach) IMO still needs to mature a bit.



posted on Sep, 23 2005 @ 01:37 AM
link   
A whole bunch of people were hoping to see an IBM 970 MP powered dual core PowerMac
at the Paris Expo this week and at least a small speed bump to the PowerBooks.

Steve Jobs said the Intel Macs are on track for June 2006.

While the upcoming dual core Intel models will probably delight many who have been waiting
for the elusive G5 PowerBook, most seasoned users will wait to see what happens to the Rev A's
rather than playing crash test dummy.

Right now plenty of people are quite content to grab one of the PowerPC models.

Suprisingly, the 17"WS iMac G5 2.0 GHZ, 128VRAM model is one of the best price-performance
machines apple has ever built. For the average user and even some advanced users, it gives the best overll bang for your buck.

The 12" and 14" iBooks are a well proven and a greatly improved big seller with students.

The PowerMac G5 dual 2.3 is the sweetspot in performance desktops.

My G5 2.0 dual kicks ass already and I'm adding another GB of RAM and a 250GB SATA cuda drive.

I'm actually blown away by the prices today.

250 GB Seagate Barracuda SATA for $109.00 at Newegg, less than $.50 a Gig.

1 GB of DDR 400 SDRAM PC 3200 (2X512) for $104.00

We forget way to easily what this kinda stuff would have cost 6 years ago.

But none of this great gear means diddly squat without a sold and secure OS.

Even thoughI'm clearly pro Mac,
I would love to see a loaded 4 GB Alienware ALX AMD dual core with 512MBVRAM
running OS X natively.

Give it 2 years.



new topics

top topics



 
0

log in

join