Help ATS with a contribution via PayPal:
learn more

Its starting, and the media is still quiet.

page: 1
0
<<   2  3  4 >>

log in

join

posted on Sep, 2 2005 @ 08:59 PM
link   
I live near Baltimore and work downtown. A rumor was going around this afternoon that there were lines at the pumps, but I figured people were just all getting gas now instead of spread out over a few days and that it was no big deal. I left for home around 5:00pm (eastern US time) and as I headed home past gas station after gas station that was closed.

Out of gas.

The county where I live was the same. After checking 6 stations I found one that was still selling high grade for $4.50 a gallon but the line for it was long.

Georgia, South Carolina, North Carolina, Virginia, DC, and Maryland are out of gas. The cities are dry and the rural areas of the states are being drained quickly.

Here is a picture I took of a nearby gas station all closed up.

The national media isn't mentioning it yet as more than a side note, but its going to grow.

The local news station is reporting on the event very lightly.


WBAL-TV 11 News reporter David Collins reported that Baltimore City police officers have responded to many gas stations to control crowds.
Source

The news is saying that its nothing, but it is. I can't get gas. Most people can't. And where there is gas, there are arguments breaking out. This just hit us today, but already is happening all over the south east US.

Airlines are starting to cancel flights and even shut down now, and there is a rumor much of the mass transit system will slow or shut down soon.
Airports Closing

If this only goes for the 3 day weekend, I think we can recover, but if it keeps up, something serious is going to erupt in the south east. THere is a strange quiet over the city right now, I think people are waiting to see how much, if any gas is out there tomorrow, but tension is high. And since there was no disater in this area, there is no overwhelming urge to show good nature either. I'm not scared, but I am rather concerned about the next few days. And i'm curious to see what people do, and if the situation changes for better or worse.

edit: fixed link



[edit on 2-9-2005 by Quest]




posted on Sep, 2 2005 @ 09:20 PM
link   
This is what I have been saying all along. This hurricane will affect the entire country. If something can't be done fast, it's going to be more than just the gulfcoast folks that are unemployed and homeless. Can you imagine living in this country without oil?



posted on Sep, 2 2005 @ 09:34 PM
link   
No gas in parts of Northern Ohio as well. I filled up and a tanker was there... the driver said they had no more tankers coming for upwards of a week.. or more



posted on Sep, 2 2005 @ 09:59 PM
link   
Check this out..

en.wikipedia.org...


The movie deals with the impact that a fictional Category 4 (not a Category 5, the highest actual category) hurricane in the Gulf of Mexico would have if it hit New Orleans, destroyed large numbers of offshore oil rigs in the Gulf, and crippled the primary nerve center of the Gulf Coast petroleum industry at Port Fourchon, Louisiana. It shows how the effects of that disaster could reasonably ripple throughout the United States, even in areas far removed from landfall.

While the loss of life and property in the storm is staggering, the greater impact is on the crippled energy industry. Due to the destruction at Port Fourchon and in the Gulf, oil prices skyrocket, and the U.S. government is forced to take immediate action to rebuild the Gulf's energy infrastructure. Once the storm passes, the government starts to rebuild the infrastructure at Port Fourchon (requiring a minimum of 8 months) and repair or replace damaged offshore rigs (requiring a similar amount of time). Also, shipping that would normally go to Port Fourchon is rerouted to the Port of Houston, and the government requires Houston's port facilities to work around-the-clock.

With widespread gas lines and prices over $3.00 per gallon, the U.S. persuades Saudi Arabia to increase its oil production. The Saudi decision to aid America causes a backlash among a restive Muslim population already energized because of the U.S. intervention in Iraq. Local terrorists stage an attack in an upscale shopping mall in Riyadh which kills about 300 Americans associated with multinational oil companies. This attack leads the U.S. to send troops to Saudi Arabia. In the meantime, the oil crisis escalates when two large tankers collide in the narrow Houston Ship Channel, shutting down the Channel.






Not so fake after all?


The real life catastrophe of Hurricane Katrina nearly parallels the events in the movie in an almost prophetic way.

On August 28, 2005, Hurricane Katrina was in direct path to hit Port Fourchon and New Orleans. Many of the initial scenes of Hurricane Julia were playing out in real life with Hurricane Katrina, such as the mandatory evacuation of New Orleans, the opening of the Superdome, and the changing of traffic to contraflow.

On August 29th, 2005, at 7 AM CDT, it was reported on CNN that Hurricane Katrina directly hit Port Fourchon, another fictional event in the movie to come true in real life. Also it was reported that the fate of many oil rigs set up in the Gulf is currently uncertain. Saudis agree to up oil production to help with the crisis.[1]

On August 30th, 2005, many gas stations raise prices by a considerable amount putting most of america over $3.00/gallon as shown in the movie. Some analyists predict that gas will hit $4.00/gallon.[2]

On September 1st, 2005, gas stations throughout the country begin to run out of fuel due to worries of mass shortages. Some stations in Atlanta were selling gas at nearly $6/gallon.


View Promo

[edit on 9/2/2005 by QuietSoul]



posted on Sep, 2 2005 @ 10:04 PM
link   
do you have ANY IDEA how many dry gas stations we passed en route to texas for evacuation? LOTS. and thats just because there were so many people evacuating at once. With the rigs shut down, its only getting worse.

you should need a permit or something to own anything bigger than a pickup truck.



posted on Sep, 2 2005 @ 10:10 PM
link   
After reading this thread, I thought "yeah, right..." Then I decided that since I have several gas stations near my home, I'd check a few. Went through three before I found one that still had gas. I asked the attendant how long he thought they would have gas, he said the rest of tonight, maybe tomorrow morning....thereafter, they have no idea how long they'll have to wait. OK, I'm normally very calm and rational, but this has me worried. If you find gas, I'd work on nonperishable food next. Trucking is going to get slammed here.

Good luck everyone, we are entering uncertain times.



[edit on 2-9-2005 by loam]



posted on Sep, 2 2005 @ 10:11 PM
link   
Thank god, I dont drive. I live In NY but never use heat anyway in the Winter,

I love the Cold.



posted on Sep, 2 2005 @ 10:12 PM
link   

Originally posted by Kitsunegari
you should need a permit or something to own anything bigger than a pickup truck.


I was about to buy a car next weekend. Thats on hold for the moment, but I'm probably getting a scooter (90mpg) or at WORSE a motorcycle of high effeciency car. This is of course assuming things get some-what back to normal. If not, I'll be getting some extra hiking boots.



posted on Sep, 2 2005 @ 10:14 PM
link   
People are riding bikes with gas cans to get fuel where i live in Indiana, this is making me nervous.



posted on Sep, 2 2005 @ 10:15 PM
link   
and i thank you for thinking of how having a car would not only make you poor very rapidly, but also affect the rest of the country in a negative way. im refusing to drive unless this situation gets a LOT better. and even then i dont know.



posted on Sep, 2 2005 @ 10:18 PM
link   
I'm thinking that this thread needs to be moved back to CURRENT EVENTS. We should ask ATS members to verify their status and location. Let's see how quickly this situation is spreading.....

[edit on 2-9-2005 by loam]



posted on Sep, 2 2005 @ 10:20 PM
link   
what do you mean 'verify their status and location' ?



posted on Sep, 2 2005 @ 10:21 PM
link   
DUDE! You fell for those rumours.
wjz.com...


Governor Robert L. Ehrlich, Jr., issued the following statement: "Marylanders can ignore the rumor that the State is closing down gas stations today, or any other day. The rumor is absolutely and entirely untrue. Marylanders should continue to lead their every day lives, while being mindful to conserve energy when appropriate. We are already taking the precautionary steps to help ensure every Marylander has access to adequate supplies of gasoline. Again, continue leading your everyday lives, conserve energy when appropriate, and enjoy the holiday weekend."

A Baltimore radio station apparently gave out false information saying gas stations would be forced to close at 4 p.m.


The truth is. Which I just learned from local television. Is some idiot gas owner decided to create a buying frenzy by raising prices to $7 and saying they were running out of gas so people would pay ridiculas prices for it thus big profits.
ITS ALL A LIE



posted on Sep, 2 2005 @ 10:25 PM
link   

ITS ALL A LIE


No its not! I just went through three before I found one with gas! READ MY POST! I am not in the business of falling for scams or hoaxes. Nor do I perpetrate them. I went to test this one, because I could. QUEST is right on this one. I don;t care what the media or government says. This one I have seen with my own eyes.

Perhaps it's localized, but we have the means on this board to go out and verify this easily and report accordingly.

[edit on 2-9-2005 by loam]



posted on Sep, 2 2005 @ 10:26 PM
link   
no loam, he said maryland was DRY. meaning completely DRY.



posted on Sep, 2 2005 @ 10:30 PM
link   

Originally posted by Kitsunegari
no loam, he said maryland was DRY. meaning completely DRY.


Oh, sorry. Even after rereading that post, I still don't get that, but ok.

Look, I think this thread needs to be moved to ATSNN of CURRENT EVENTS and get more visibility.



posted on Sep, 2 2005 @ 10:36 PM
link   
Well as it turns out I am also in the baltimore region and I live in line of sight of two gas stations and I see everything is as it should be. Gas is expensive but theres plenty to go around.
Loam where exactly do you live?



posted on Sep, 2 2005 @ 10:36 PM
link   
In Western Kentucky, my town has four gas stations. Three of the four are down to selling 87 only. The fourth is completely out of gas. And the other three are out of diesel (bad for farmers). All four are/were selling gasoline at 2.99 and diesel at 2.89.

The larger towns have cars stretched for miles attempting to get gasoline. The prices, however, seem relatively low for the larger town. $2.39 at one gas station.



posted on Sep, 2 2005 @ 10:37 PM
link   
There are unconfirmed rumors circulating around Western NC that they may be letting kids out of school over the gas supplies. I love all the Leaders comming out and saying "No we aren't out of gas, don't panic, just conserve", but when you drive down to the local station and they and every other station for miles is out of gas, then you get on the net and read everywhere else is too, then something is up.
"Don't Panic..."
Nero might have said it no better.



posted on Sep, 2 2005 @ 10:40 PM
link   
I'm in Corpus Christi, TX. We still have gas here, but this is a refining town. The trucks will need gas to transport the gas. I still remember the oil crisis in the 70s. I fear this may be worse. All we can do now is prepare. Wait and see what happens next.





new topics

top topics



 
0
<<   2  3  4 >>

log in

join