How Katrina will affect the US

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posted on Aug, 31 2005 @ 08:57 AM
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I worry that malaria could appear:


I'd worrry more about West Nile Fever.

Katrina will bump up oil prices in the short term, which in turn will probably cause a few jutters on the stock marcket. In 6 months things will pick up as reconstruction gets under way.




posted on Aug, 31 2005 @ 10:43 AM
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Originally posted by WestPoint23
whaaa you should consider the field of helping depressed people, I think you could speed up their suicides exponentially.






I call it like I see it! Do you want me to sugar coat it for you WestPoint?

Sometimes the truth hurts; but at least I'm volunteering for a relief agency.
I expect you will doing the same eh? Or will you be hanging out on the www critizing folks for telling the truth as they see it?




[edit on 31-8-2005 by whaaa]



posted on Aug, 31 2005 @ 10:51 AM
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I call it like I see it! Do you want me to sugar coat it for you WestPoint?

Sometimes the truth hurts; but at least I'm volunteering for a relief agency.
I expect you will doing the same eh? Or will you be hanging out on the www critizing folks for telling the truth as they see it?


No sugar coat required, but you express your thoughts on things that might happen as a result from this storm. I hardly call that the truth.

Anyway I live a considerable amount away form the damage and don’t have the time to volunteer. I am however donating money and goods for the affected areas.

[edit on 31-8-2005 by WestPoint23]



posted on Aug, 31 2005 @ 01:10 PM
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Guys, please.
We are discussing the effects of Katrina, so let's keep the drama our of it.

Back on topic



posted on Aug, 31 2005 @ 02:21 PM
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Originally posted by Amuk
I know if I still did construction me and my entire crew would be headed south right now.

Most of what yall site is bad but temporary, the reconstruction will go on for YEARS

Yes, this is the silver lining - there will be tons of jobs in nearly every sector once the rebuilding begins.

I just heard on the radio that the administration is relaxing some controls that currently exist on gasoline, in order to minimize the effect at the pump. Controls such as the degree to which gas needs to be refined in order to accomodate environmental rules. This will be put into effect immediately and last until Sept. 15. Sorry for the sparse details; I just caught a snippet of the report.



posted on Aug, 31 2005 @ 03:13 PM
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Sorry DTOM

CNN is currently talking about the public health implications as a result of Katrina.

As bad as the drowning fatalities were, the deaths from mosquito borne diseases could be catostrophic all over the south, even in areas unaffected by flood waters.

I guage the economic health of the country by watching spot precious metal prices. Gold and sterling just jumped 5 points.

America needs to brace itself because this catostrophy is truely of Biblical proportions. In the grand scheme of things this is not something that is just a local problem; this will have global implications.

This is another disaster where all differences racial, political and cultural must disappear or we as a nation will never be the same.

ONE LOVE


[edit on 31-8-2005 by whaaa]



posted on Aug, 31 2005 @ 03:39 PM
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but there is still a full month of prime time hurricane season left to go....



i think new orleans is an apt metaphor for the US economy. vulnerable, protected by a series of barriers [similar to levees] that keep out the huge flood of consequences.

consequences that we've incurred from all the fiscal irresponsibility [both on a national and individual level] that's characterized post-modern america.

at this point there is not much left to keep the economic deluge from rushing in and overwhelming everything.


geez louise, what happens to the economy if we nuke iran next month??










posted on Aug, 31 2005 @ 04:42 PM
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Coast to Coast guest Scott Stevens and Richard C. Hogland suggests that what is left of the soviet union is actually engaged in war with us using weather control technology that has finally been mastered.

The Chinese gov't also boasts of weather control ability.

There may be something to this, and then again perhaps not.

Ivan and Katrina are Russian names though, and it was almost a slap in the face to the national hurricane weather center there in Florida. The eye passed right over it.



posted on Aug, 31 2005 @ 04:49 PM
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Im due to fly back to England by means of Delta through cinncinati later this week, I hope there arnt any problems with fuel or they dont raise prices.

Vorta



posted on Aug, 31 2005 @ 06:13 PM
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It's not just NOLA that is affected. Although they certainly are in dire straights right now. When you look at this map, remember that September is usually the busiest month for hurricanes in the gulf. This may just be the tip of the iceburgh for some of the other states and certainly for Louisanna if they get the rain fall.





posted on Aug, 31 2005 @ 06:48 PM
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Posted elsewhere but relevant to this thread.

The wife and I filled up Sunday night at $2.65 in Syracuse area. I reloaded today at $3.00 at a local retailer and my wife at $2.85 at Mobil. Across the street from Mobil it was $3.19. I have 3 5 gallon containers on standby just in case -- but you can't let it sit too long or it turns bad. You never know how people will react when they hear about potential shortages or rationing. Our plan is to top off the tanks every couple of days just in case. We're "averaging up" in investment terms.

I fully expect $4 by this weekend. We're rather far from refineries and ports. On an aside, I think we're going to Sam's tonight to stock up on durable goods to potentially offset the inevitable rise in prices of everything.

My wife and make a very good combined income and have no kids but we find ourselves wondering about the impacts. I can only imagine what people less fortunate our going through as prices have already begun rising.



posted on Aug, 31 2005 @ 07:41 PM
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I live in Corpus Christi, TX. This is a refinery city. Last night I filled my tank at $2.59 a gallon. Today the same station is selling the same octane at $2.99 a gallon. This is going to be nation wide so get used to it. The majority of the gulf coast has been wiped out and will be hard down for possibly months.

The cable networks seem to be fixated on NOLA, but this is one hurricane that affected the entire country!



posted on Aug, 31 2005 @ 08:24 PM
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Throwing The Good Book At Us


Originally posted by whaaa
America needs to brace itself because this catostrophy is truely of Biblical proportions. In the grand scheme of things this is not something that is just a local problem; this will have global implications.

If my "predictions" are correct, this is nothing compared to what's coming, and it won't be limited to earthquakes, nor to the U.S., nor the "Lands of the West".

And I continue to feel strongly that Something Big is coming in mid-December, although I hope nothing does, because I'm pretty fed up with this whole stupid prophecy business, to be honest.

But I don't get to choose my visions or dreams, and though I haven't been posting them, they still come.

While I am probably the world's biggest optimist in the long term, the short-term outlook is very, very grim.

As heartbreaking as this Katrina business is, I'm trying to maintain a certain Zen attitude about it, because I am confident that this is a drop in the bucket compared to what's coming down the pike.

More storms, more floods, earthquakes, plagues, pestilence, famine (yes, even in the U.S.), riots, wars and worse. And over all of it, I am haunted by the warning of ill winds, dark winds, poison winds, that kill many people, and a pall of genuine, elemental, primordial evil that will envelop the world.

On the one hand, I hope I'm wrong about the "doom and gloom", but on the other hand, if I'm right, and my "visions" (which I postulate are actually memories) are more or less accurate, then what comes after the horrors ahead will be well worth the misery.

Meanwhile, we must live our lives as best we can, and as sure as the sun rises and sets, people will do exactly that, as we always have.

Sorry to get all "fire and brimstone" outside the prophecies forums, but well, this has a ring to it, and someone said "Biblical"...

Fearsome things are happening, and worse is coming, but there is no need to fear.

Just be prepared for the worst and hope for the best.



posted on Sep, 1 2005 @ 10:05 PM
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Originally posted by victor was right
but there is still a full month of prime time hurricane season left to go....


i think new orleans is an apt metaphor for the US economy. vulnerable, protected by a series of barriers [similar to levees] that keep out the huge flood of consequences.

consequences that we've incurred from all the fiscal irresponsibility [both on a national and individual level] that's characterized post-modern america.

at this point there is not much left to keep the economic deluge from rushing in and overwhelming everything.


geez louise, what happens to the economy if we nuke iran next month??


Could not agree more victor. And the White House press secretary said that flood control was a major priority since "day one."
How much was the Army Corps of Engineers flood control request cut? And never mind those pesky wetlands...

One thing is for sure though. The National Guard is great for responding to such crises at home. Traditionally, that is one of their major roles. But where are so many thousands of them? Of course, Iraq, fighting an abnormally expensive war of dubious necessity. Of course, makes perfect sense when it comes to the security of the homeland.


How much less anarchy would be going on if they were deployed en mass in New Orleans?



posted on Sep, 2 2005 @ 07:05 AM
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I would hope that this opens people's eyes to the huge gap between rich and poor in the US, and maybe the gap between black and white, too.

It's standard attitude in America that you ought to look out for yourself. The "Me Atttitude". That's why you have people ripping off TVs and booze and causing trouble in New Orleans. They are looking out for themselves. Grab as much Gatorade off that shelf as you can, because nobody is going to help you but you, pal. No Gatorade? Well someone's gonna grab that TV soon, so it may as well be you.

There is a definite lack of sense of community that is adding to the chaos in New Orleans. I can't for the life of me fathom why aid is taking so long to get to those who need it. What makes New Orleans so different from Florida that it takes days to mobilize aid? Poverty?


I just hope that people get the help they need and that nobody gets shot for taking actual food.

jako



posted on Sep, 2 2005 @ 12:14 PM
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It seems to have sure changed some views of America around the world.



LONDON (Reuters) - The world has watched amazed as the planet's only superpower struggles with the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina, with some saying the chaos has exposed flaws and deep divisions in American society.

World leaders and ordinary citizens have expressed sympathy with the people of the southern United States whose lives were devastated by the hurricane and the flooding that followed.

But many have also been shocked by the images of disorder beamed around the world -- looters roaming the debris-strewn streets and thousands of people gathered in New Orleans waiting for the authorities to provide food, water and other aid.

"Anarchy in the USA" declared Britain's best-selling newspaper The Sun.

"Apocalypse Now" headlined Germany's Handelsblatt daily.

The pictures of the catastrophe -- which has killed hundreds and possibly thousands -- have evoked memories of crises in the world's poorest nations such as last year's tsunami in Asia, which left more than 230,000 people dead or missing.

But some view the response to those disasters more favorably than the lawless aftermath of Hurricane Katrina.

"I am absolutely disgusted. After the tsunami our people, even the ones who lost everything, wanted to help the others who were suffering," said Sajeewa Chinthaka, 36, as he watched a cricket match in Colombo, Sri Lanka.

"Not a single tourist caught in the tsunami was mugged. Now with all this happening in the U.S. we can easily see where the civilized part of the world's population is."



Continue reading

[edit on 2-9-2005 by andpau66]



posted on Sep, 2 2005 @ 12:50 PM
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If Katrina had hit Miami instead of NO; Would the disaster response have been so slow?

I'll bet the National Guard would have been there in hours rather than days.

The response to this was disgraceful. What are all our tax dollars going to FEMA being used for? High salaries for the admistration I'll bet.



[edit on 2-9-2005 by whaaa]



posted on Sep, 2 2005 @ 04:00 PM
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As Katrina has wiped out most of the oil production capacity in the region (that accounts for over a quarter of total national consumption) Could we expect to see a foreign-policy/military response to secure further oil reserves outside of Iraq to shore-up US national demand???

Also, as the largest supertanker oil-import transfer network has been severely damaged, what kind of effect is this going to have on an already fragile inflationary economy??



posted on Sep, 2 2005 @ 10:53 PM
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This is one answer....

www.abovetopsecret.com...



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