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Camel through the eye of a needle?

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posted on Aug, 26 2005 @ 03:35 AM
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'It is easier for a camel to go through the eye of a needle than for a rich man to enter the Kingdom of God.'

I believe the bible was mistranslated with that passage. Instead of :
'It is easier for a camel to go through the eye of a needle than for the rich to enter the Kingdom of God.'

It should say,

'It is easier for a rope to go through the eye of a needle than for the rich to enter the Kingdom of God.'

A quote from Strange Stories, Amazing Facts by Readers Digest, page 533:

'The original Greek tells not of a camel, but a rope (kamilos). When it was translated into Latin, 'kamilos' was confused with 'kamelos' (camel). The error has been perpetuated in almost every language in which the Bible has been printed.

If this is so, then what other false passages are in the current bibles? I remember hearing once the original text shall not be misquoted / changed but it seems inevidable these days. Another example:

www.abovetopsecret.com...

- Nazgarn




posted on Aug, 26 2005 @ 08:34 AM
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interesting...I had heard that the "camel through the needle" thing was actually a reference to a mountain pass that was narrow and treacherous - it was called "The Eye of the Needle" in those days.

Now, I can't remember where I heard or read this but, I do remember it being from some source that I considered reliable at that time.

Anybody else?

Edited to add:
I don't this is a very popular parable these days, anyway - especially not in the new "prosperity" ministries that are popping up all over.


[edit on 26-8-2005 by Al Davison]



posted on Aug, 26 2005 @ 12:23 PM
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Originally posted by Al Davison
interesting...I had heard that the "camel through the needle" thing was actually a reference to a mountain pass that was narrow and treacherous - it was called "The Eye of the Needle" in those days.

Now, I can't remember where I heard or read this but, I do remember it being from some source that I considered reliable at that time.

Anybody else?
I had heard the rope thing. Which makes sense, to me, in that it is saying a rope is too wide to go through a narrow opening--essentially:

Enter ye in at the strait gate: for wide is the gate, and broad is the way, that leadeth to destruction, and many there be which go in thereat: Because strait is the gate, and narrow is the way, which leadeth unto life, and few there be that find it.
Matthew 7:13-14

Money--and the love of it and desire to have as much as possible--makes many people accept things not acceptable for any other reason, and often they compromise their own set of personal ideals or standards in order to obtain money--especially when they're in a hard place that money would get them out of. Sometimes, it's just greed, but even need can cause compromise.

I understand 'evil' to truly be self-orientation and selfishness that is exclusive of considering anyone else. A lack of kindness and generosity to others, an absence of love. And so, the love of money is truly the root of all evil. It's not by default--but can lead even the most well-intentioned person to a place where they care only for their own wants/needs/comforts.


Edited to add:
I don't this is a very popular parable these days, anyway - especially not in the new "prosperity" ministries that are popping up all over.


[edit on 26-8-2005 by Al Davison]
No doubt! I am a harsh and unrelenting critic of those who say 'I trust God' yet worry about their weekly paycheck--especially salaried 'ministers of the word.' Why should I trust a man who is paid to please a congregation?

The main reason there is such misinformation and criticism of the bible, and the those who truly believe in it (Not church, but the bible) is because of those who put themselves in a position of authority about what it says--who didn't study to know, but to earn a living--and who still fear for their lives and believe that to have one's life saved is a miracle--to tell others you are saved, but then pray like crazy when the plane is going down, that is true hypocrisy. It's not bad to not feel secure--but wrong to say you are but show otherwise.

No good examples in this world.



posted on Aug, 26 2005 @ 03:33 PM
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Originally posted by queenannie38

I had heard the rope thing. Which makes sense, to me, in that it is saying a rope is too wide to go through a narrow opening--essentially:


I never heard it, but it makes ALOT of sense !!!


Originally posted by queenannie38

I understand 'evil' to truly be self-orientation and selfishness that is exclusive of considering anyone else.


I've never heard it defined better than this !!!



posted on Aug, 26 2005 @ 04:38 PM
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so what kind of hair did John the Batists to make his clothing with? since it was suppose to be camel hair.

How about Matthew 23:24 " You blind guides! You strain out a gnat but swallow a camel."

not to metion the word "rope" was never used in the gospels

THe verse in question is an obvious hyperbole. Something that is impossible, now becomes doubly impossible by using hyperbole.



posted on Aug, 26 2005 @ 04:40 PM
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Does it really make a difference in this passage?

Niether a camel nor a rope would fit through the eye of a needle. That was the point of the story.

---Pineapple



posted on Aug, 26 2005 @ 08:50 PM
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Originally posted by pineappleupsidedown
Does it really make a difference in this passage?

Niether a camel nor a rope would fit through the eye of a needle. That was the point of the story.

---Pineapple
LOL
I read your post, and my memory suddenly reminded me that I had this discussion somewhere else, some time ago--because I remembered someone else made that same point! Obviously a good one.



posted on Aug, 26 2005 @ 09:37 PM
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the point is that to go through the eye of the needle (which was the gate utilized to enter jerusalem at nightime when the main gate is closed), you have to unload the camel of all of its goods before it can go thru crawling. Its a analogy that you have to unload all ill gotten gains before you can enter the city of peace during your nightime here on earth.



posted on Aug, 26 2005 @ 11:07 PM
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OK, that's another good and plausible explaination that is new to me.

To answer the obvious question - nope. none of this changes the moral of the story or the message. Still, geeks like us just love this stuff. Heheheeee!



posted on Aug, 27 2005 @ 12:01 AM
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What is the point of this post?

I suppose the importance of this is:

One word (rope) was mistranslated as (camel). This is not very well known I don't think. The point being -- what ELSE isn't correctly translated? Due to the different variations in bibles as well there are minor differences which can totally change the meaning of a story / parable. An example of this is in this thread:

www.abovetopsecret.com...

- Nazgarn



posted on Aug, 27 2005 @ 02:17 AM
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Keep in mind those examples are of the Jehovah's witnesses, which most Christian groups consider to be a type of cult, not actually a christian denomination.

---Pineapple




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