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Aircraft bombed!

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posted on Aug, 24 2005 @ 08:52 AM
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www.lookatentertainment.com...


words cannot describe the event!


real in cockpit footage of a birdstrike :

www.lookatentertainment.com...


and finally - how low is this 747!

www.lookatentertainment.com...




posted on Aug, 24 2005 @ 09:11 AM
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The one in the jumbo jet might be in Crete, near Hersonisos (or whatever the captial was), aircraft frequently came in that low over the water.

The birdstriked aircraft crashed? did he bail?



posted on Aug, 24 2005 @ 09:24 AM
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yes , you can clearly hear the `eject eject eject`



posted on Aug, 24 2005 @ 09:35 AM
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What kind of aircraft was the second one? I though military aircraft could take a bird strike to the engine?



posted on Aug, 24 2005 @ 09:38 AM
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It might have been an F-16 since it only has one engine.

It had some spike on the nose, typical for experimental planes.



posted on Aug, 24 2005 @ 10:10 AM
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Looks like an A-4 Skyhawk not an F-16.



posted on Aug, 24 2005 @ 10:27 AM
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Originally posted by GrOuNd_ZeRo
It might have been an F-16 since it only has one engine.

It had some spike on the nose, typical for experimental planes.


Yes, it's not an F-16...First look at the tail wing, wich in the F-16 is positioned on the same hight as the engine, not above. Secondly The
F-16 has two tails under the engine, the plane here in question doesn't have them. Thirdly the canopy is different from the F-16, And fourth, look at their size. The Hornet (in picture) and the
"F-16" are about as big. F-16: Lenght 49 feet, wing span 31 feet. F-18 Lenght 56 feet, wing span 37 feet. The planes in the video are totally diferrent size!



[edit on 24-8-2005 by Figher Master FIN]



posted on Aug, 24 2005 @ 10:30 AM
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So my guess would also be the Skyhawk, since the tail wing is above the engine, not on the same hight!




posted on Aug, 24 2005 @ 02:51 PM
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Also, The '18 was in it's original testing McDD livery. The Navy would have used A4's to spot during these tests.



posted on Aug, 24 2005 @ 03:12 PM
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Wow, that ejection footage had my heart racing. Just goes to show you that when flying high-performance aircraft, you can go from feast to famine really, really fast.......



posted on Aug, 24 2005 @ 06:10 PM
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Guys, WestPoint23 was asking about the bird strike video.

It's a BAE Hawk mk 115. Here is the accident report from the accident.

And yes, the "victim" jet in the fly away bomb video was an A-4. There really isn't another jet that looks like the Skyhawk.... Ugly hunchbacked thing, but supposedly a joy to fly.

[edit on 8/24/2005 by CyberianHusky]



posted on Aug, 24 2005 @ 06:32 PM
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I've got to admit, that bird into the engine and ejection video had my heart going thumpity thump too.

My question is why can't they build a titanium cage that would fit over the intake that would keep birds from making it into the engine. Something super strong with large enough ports to insure adequate air intake. It could even be retractable so at higher altitudes where there is less chance of running into a bird it could be pulled back to allow maximum intake.

I'm sure theres a good reason for this, but since i'm not that highly schooled in the dynamics of jet aircraft, I just thought I would ask.

Wupy



posted on Aug, 24 2005 @ 07:27 PM
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The simple answer for why they don't put a cage over the intake, is weight. Every pound of weight is an extra pound of drag. You try to keep the weight down as low as possible with fighters to maximize speed and manuverability.



posted on Aug, 24 2005 @ 07:33 PM
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Originally posted by WestPoint23
What kind of aircraft was the second one? I though military aircraft could take a bird strike to the engine?


It was a trainer aircraft. The pilots survived by ejecting. I believe it was during a multinational training event in Canada.



posted on Aug, 24 2005 @ 08:46 PM
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Originally posted by jetsetter

It was a trainer aircraft. The pilots survived by ejecting. I believe it was during a multinational training event in Canada.


It was probably a trainer. I think you're right. Note that the video says "bird hits aircraft Landing Gear", which is untrue because it says "engine failure" on the radio several times. I'm surprised they don't put cages on trainers though, cuz they don't do any real-time combat duty, except perhaps in a live-fire excersize like Red Flag.



posted on Aug, 24 2005 @ 08:50 PM
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It's also not an American aircraft. US built planes use a female voice for warnings in the cockpit.



posted on Aug, 25 2005 @ 12:02 AM
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Originally posted by Zaphod58
It's also not an American aircraft. US built planes use a female voice for warnings in the cockpit.

That's true? What's the program called that is installed into the aircraft? And is it standard on all aircraft?

There has to be some american aircraft that have different tones of voices, does the tone of voice on the program really make a difference?

Shattered OUT...



posted on Aug, 25 2005 @ 12:04 AM
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It's called B*tching Betty. They used a womans voice because they discovered that pilots respond better to a female voice than a male voice. It's a standard program on all US fighters. It's actually pretty emotionless, but I've heard it before, and you really do listen to it when it talks.



posted on Aug, 25 2005 @ 02:18 PM
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You know... if you would just read the ACCIDENT REPORT that I posted earlier then you would know exactly what kind of aircraft it was and where it happened.


And you don't put a cage over an intake simply because it would obstruct airflow and make whatever air does come in inconsistant in its flow.



posted on Aug, 25 2005 @ 02:37 PM
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Originally posted by ShatteredSkies
There has to be some american aircraft that have different tones of voices, does the tone of voice on the program really make a difference?

Shattered OUT...


Actually yes...it does matter. The aircraft industry and military has spent TONS of money on research into such matters, tone of voice, volume, male/female, emotion/calm all has to do with human reaction time and attention given.




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