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To 'Opt-Out' is to opt-out of the Yearbook

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posted on Aug, 22 2005 @ 04:23 PM
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I'm still having a hard time accepting this one. Apparently if a high-school student or his parents sign an 'Opt-Out' form, to prevent their information from being released to the military recruiters, the kid is left out of the yearbook, college scholarship lists and honors!



Under the No Child Left Behind Act, schools that receive federal funds are required to provide names of high school juniors and seniors, their addresses, and telephone listings to military recruiters upon request.
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The only "out" for parents to eliminate phone calls from recruiters is to sign an "opt out" form.
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"If a student or their parents sign the (opt out) form, their name and private information is excluded not only from recruiters, but from all lists, such as college scholarships, honors and even the yearbook," said Boyle County High School principal Elmer Thomas. "All the districts have similar opt out forms. However very few sign it because the students do not want to be left out of their high school yearbook." "What senior doesn't want to be in the yearbook? That is the only reason I signed. My son has collected yearbooks since elementary school," Allen said.


Source

What do you think about this?




posted on Aug, 22 2005 @ 04:27 PM
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What! Thats insane. I cant believe the army would even take your phone and address from your school! Whats worse is that when you opt out you cant be included in scholarships or yearbooks. What idiot signed this into law



posted on Aug, 22 2005 @ 04:31 PM
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Yeah.

I think it's because the opt-out form is to prevent release of student information to ANY 3rd party (like colleges or photographers, etc). They need to develop a form especially for recruiters.



posted on Aug, 22 2005 @ 04:55 PM
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Whats the big deal if a recruiter gets your name or address? Its not as if they can force you to join the military, you still have the choice to say "No thank you", and besides, if the military wanted your name that badly, wouldnt they be able to get it from another goverment database, such as the DMV?

Also i opted out of the yearbook in highschool after 9th grade because i found out they were putting the pictures taken on picture day into the computers. Sorry, i want to be as anonymous as possible, dont want my name, all my information and my picture in any database if i can help it. And it worked too, despite them trying to force me to have my picture taken in 12th and 13th grade.



posted on Aug, 22 2005 @ 05:34 PM
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If you're male you're supposed to register with Selective Services anyway when you become 18. So if they are looking to recruit you they can just use that list.

More Info:
www.sss.gov...



posted on Aug, 22 2005 @ 06:21 PM
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Originally posted by mOjOm
If you're male you're supposed to register with Selective Services anyway when you become 18. So if they are looking to recruit you they can just use that list.


Yes, but we're talking about school age children, 9th graders, not 18 year olds.

AlanSmithee, have you read about the pressure these recruiters are putting on high-school kids? You think peer pressure is bad... These are adults using psychology to manipulate impressionable minds. If a child had the wherewithall to say "no thanks" there wouldn't be a teen drug problem or teen pregnancy problem.

When they're 18, then they can make up their own minds, but until then, I don't want an adult trying to manipulate my child into doing something he's not mature enough to decide to do. I don't want them anywhere near my child.

Recruiters Lies

Recruiters Canvas 6th Graders

Recruiting Tactics for Kids



posted on Aug, 22 2005 @ 07:53 PM
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The "opt out" is part of the privacy act. I have no idea how it has been interpreted to keep some child out of a year book. Unless year books suddenly publish addresses with names it would not make sense.



posted on Aug, 22 2005 @ 08:10 PM
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Originally posted by Benevolent Heretic
Yes, but we're talking about school age children, 9th graders, not 18 year olds.


Well, I don't know why we're talking about 9th graders since this has nothing to do with them.

Under the No Child Left Behind Act, schools that receive federal funds are required to provide names of high school juniors and seniors, their addresses, and telephone listings to military recruiters upon request.

High School Juniors and Seniors is what it says, not Freshman.

Unless of course they are a Freshman who's been held back enough to actually be an 18 y/o Freshman in which case they are probably exactly what the military is looking for.



posted on Aug, 22 2005 @ 08:40 PM
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Originally posted by mOjOm
Well, I don't know why we're talking about 9th graders since this has nothing to do with them.

Under the No Child Left Behind Act, schools that receive federal funds are required to provide names of high school juniors and seniors, their addresses, and telephone listings to military recruiters upon request.


You're right, I missed that. I'm sorry.


Originally posted by anniejhops
The "opt out" is part of the privacy act. I have no idea how it has been interpreted to keep some child out of a year book. Unless year books suddenly publish addresses with names it would not make sense.



The Opt-out is a form that says, in essence,"Do not release my child's name, etc. or any information to anyone". (That happens to include recruiters, having the kid's name in the yearbook, releasing his name to college recruiters, etc) Like I said, they need to devise a form especially for releasing information to military recruiters. But, as has been pointed out, they can get the info from the DMV anyway.

I'm just glad I don't have a child in that predicament. The recruiters say the parents are their biggest obstacle, and I certainly would be that.



posted on Aug, 22 2005 @ 08:46 PM
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I don't understand here in GA as soon you get your license you are put into the list, so if you want a license you will have to be register with the government.


That is why you only get a license good until you are 18 and then you have to get another one that's went you name goes into the nations archives. he,he,

Is not way out they got your number anyway.



posted on Aug, 22 2005 @ 09:14 PM
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I think every state is different.

And I admit to a huge chip on my shoulder about the military approaching the kids so strongly. Going into the schools and hanging out and having lunch with them and becoming their 'pals' so they can have more influence over them. It's manipulation plain and simple. They're dishonest with the kids and it just seems so slimy. And I especially hate it during this particular war.

And it's not like college recruiters. You don't get shot at in college (usually)



posted on Aug, 23 2005 @ 12:50 PM
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There is a very simple solution to this and it has nothing to do with the schools. When you turn 18 years of age all you have to do is to simply write a letter to each recruiting office (Air Force, Army, Navy and Marines) stating that you do not want to be contacted by them. It's that simple. One catch, you have to do this yourself and you have to have had your 18th birthday. Your parents can send the letter for someone under 18 but when you turn 18 you have to send another letter. This does not mean that you don't have to register for Selective Service. You want to register, trust me. I never had to register because I was on active duty on my 18th birthday. 15 years later when I was trying to apply for financial aid for college my application was held up for three weeks because I didn't have a Selective Service code. It turns out that I was issued one when I was discharged but nobody knew what it was.









 
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