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Russia test fire new sub launched ICBM

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posted on Aug, 21 2005 @ 08:23 AM
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SEVEROMORSK. Aug 17 (Interfax) - A Northern Fleet strategic nuclear submarine, the Yekaterinburg, fired an intercontinental ballistic missile at 11:08 a.m. on Wednesday, the fleet's headquarters told Interfax on Wednesday.

Yekaterinburg "launched a ballistic missile from a subsurface position in the Barents Sea at the Kura testing ground in Kamchatka," a headquarters source said.

The Space Forces monitored the launch and are accompanying and controlling it, the Space Forces' press service said.


www.interfax.ru...


Hmmm...it appears that the missile was the very latest variant of the SS-N-23.




posted on Aug, 21 2005 @ 08:43 AM
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hmmm.. this puts a rest to all those critics of the Russian SLBM capability..



posted on Aug, 21 2005 @ 10:03 AM
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Yep, managed to get 1 launch right (we think), so everything is back to 100% combat capability.....

I don't think so...



posted on Aug, 21 2005 @ 11:07 PM
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Originally posted by Starwars51
Yep, managed to get 1 launch right (we think), so everything is back to 100% combat capability.....

I don't think so...


I am with him. They have had some pretty bad mistakes with subs, so they need to show that they can perform consistently before we should give them too much credit.



posted on Aug, 23 2005 @ 12:01 AM
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Well you chaps probably don't know that before the failures in 2004 the russians never had a single SLBM missile failure..
This makes it 3 failures out of 40 launches..



posted on Aug, 23 2005 @ 02:23 AM
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And you know this how? Probably becuase the Russians were completely open and honest about their SLBM tests during the cold war and into the 1990s.

Oh, wait a minute, that's certainly not the case... unless you have had access to western or Russian monitoring equipment there is no possible way you could know how much success (or lack thereof) there has been.



posted on Aug, 23 2005 @ 03:23 AM
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Originally posted by Daedalus3
Well you chaps probably don't know that before the failures in 2004 the russians never had a single SLBM missile failure..
This makes it 3 failures out of 40 launches..


Yeah I agree with StarWars. They have had 2 failures last year with arguably their most modern SLBM. No doubt there have been numerous failures over the last 40 years.
Whose to say this test wasn't a failure, they hvaen't mentioned how accurate it was, could have landed 50 miles away for all we know



posted on Aug, 23 2005 @ 04:20 AM
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Look at how long it took them to admit to the failures in their space program. And that was an "open" project. Do you seriously think they're going to admit to failures in their ICBM project in the last 40 years?

[edit on 23-8-2005 by Zaphod58]



posted on Aug, 23 2005 @ 05:43 AM
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The Yekaterinburg submarine launched the missile from a submerged position, and the missile then traveled some 8,000 km toward its target at the Kura test range on the eastern Kamchatka peninsula. Vladimir Putin observed the firing of the missile and the Northern Fleet’s other military exercises from another ship, Pyotr Veliky


link



posted on Aug, 23 2005 @ 06:04 AM
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Sub-Launch


From the source article:
The Space Forces monitored the launch and are accompanying and controlling it, the Space Forces' press service said.

You can bet your bottom ruble they weren't the only ones monitoring the launch.

Now Russia knows a little more about its SLBM situation, and so does its friends.


How effective is Russia's SLBM arsenal?

Let's hope we never have to find out.



posted on Aug, 23 2005 @ 10:40 AM
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Originally posted by rogue1

Yeah I agree with StarWars. They have had 2 failures last year with arguably their most modern SLBM. No doubt there have been numerous failures over the last 40 years.
Whose to say this test wasn't a failure, they hvaen't mentioned how accurate it was, could have landed 50 miles away for all we know


Well, "Arguably" as it were
the launches that failed in 04'were infact one of the oldest Russian SLBMs still in service, inducted way back in the early 80s

I got my info from here..
www.nti.org...
exercept:

announced that there had been no decision to withdraw the SS-N-23s from service and said that these missiles are considered among "the most reliable." Out of 36 launches in the 1990s this was only the second failure

If you can get other links which "definitely" state otherwise, I'm eager to see them..Until then this holds..

Here's a little eye opener:


3/26/96: NORTHERN FLEET HOLDS LARGEST EXERCISES SINCE SOVIET COLLAPSE (successful SLBM launch)

6/28/96: PACIFIC FLEET CONDUCTS TRIPLE TEST LAUNCH

7/15/96: TWO SSBNS CONDUCT TEST LAUNCHES

10/3/96: SLBM TEST LAUNCH BY NORTHERN FLEET

1/15/97: SS-N-18 SLBM TEST LAUNCH

7/23/97: PACIFIC FLEET SSBN LAUNCHES SLBM

11/19/97:EXPERIMENTAL SLBM TEST FAILS, MISSILE DESTROYED
(yes I posted the failure(s) too..
)

2/19/98: TWO SLBMS SUCCESSFULLY LAUNCHED FROM DELTA-IV SSBN

8/21/98: YELTSIN VISITS NORTHERN FLEET, OBSERVES SLBM LAUNCH

4/1/99: DELTA III SUCCESSFULLY FIRES SLBM

10/1/99: PACIFIC AND NORTHERN FLEET SSBNS CONDUCT TEST LAUNCHES

10/2/99: PACIFIC FLEET DELTA III SSBN CONDUCTS SLBM TEST LAUNCH

11/17/99: TWO SLBMS FIRED BY NORTHERN FLEET SSBN

3/27/2000: NORTHERN FLEET SLBM TEST LAUNCH SUCCESSFUL

9/12/2000: NORTHERN FLEET SLBM LAUNCHED FROM SSBN IN WAKE OF KURSK ACCIDENT

12/27/2000: RUSSIAN SUBMARINE LAUNCHES SLBM

2/16/2001: NORTHERN FLEET SLBM LAUNCH

7/20/2001: RUSSIAN SSBN LAUNCHES SCIENTIFIC SATELLITE
(Thats a first for me!)

9/18/2001: RUSSIA SUCCESSFULLY TESTS SLBM

9/27/2001: RUSSIA TESTS SLBMS

7/12/2002: SSBN LAUNCHES CONVERTED SLBM

10/12/2002: SLBMs LAUNCHED AS PART OF LARGE TRAINING EXERCISE

9/2/2003: SUCCESSFUL SLBM TEST BY PACIFIC FLEET

2/17/2004: FAILED SLBM LAUNCHES DURING SECURITY-2004 EXERCISES
(This what I presume yall are harping about)

And of course the most recent test in 05'..
Now, even if there have been many "hidden" failures as many on this thread claim, the number of launches(each described in some detail in the link given above) that have been successful just in the last ten years is overwhelming..over 20 successful launches..
:p

[edit on 23-8-2005 by Daedalus3]



posted on Aug, 23 2005 @ 11:10 AM
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Originally posted by Daedalus3

Well, "Arguably" as it were
the launches that failed in 04'were infact one of the oldest Russian SLBMs still in service, inducted way back in the early 80s


Umm, so what you're saying is you have no idea what missiles were fired, duh.

The Novomoskovsk nuclear submarine failed to fire an SS-N-23 missile after two attempts in 2004, notes Xinhua
missilethreat.com...

Production of SS-N-23 missiles had ceased in 1998, but was reportedly restarted in 1999
The SS-N-23 is Russia's most advanced SLBM currently deployed, reaching IOC in 1986.
missilethreat.com...



And I'm just eager to see all that amazing intel you've gathered on failed Russian SLBM launches in the last forty years..

Gosh..I hope you've read the ATS motto now...


Well, people just aren't as gullible as you are
Deny Ignorance



posted on Aug, 23 2005 @ 11:13 AM
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Originally posted by Daedalus3
Now, even if there have been many "hidden" failures as many on this thread claim, the number of launches(each described in some detail in the link given above) that have been successful just in the last ten years is overwhelming..over 20 successful launches..
:p

[edit on 23-8-2005 by Daedalus3]


LMAO, and who guages these tests as successful ? The Russians. Now they're hardly going to say that there SLBM deterrance is crap.



posted on Aug, 23 2005 @ 11:32 AM
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Oh.. I'm sorry.. so who is supposed to gauge the credibility of these launches if not the russians..
You'd rather have them call you over everytime as an international observer??!

And besides the site I gave the link to was not russian..and it has records of all the successful launches I mentioned in my prev post..
You have problems excepting info from a US founded neutral international
site (NTI) while you expect me to swallow info from a site called "missilethreat" which is most definitely an all american yankee site..
no offence to missile threat but going by your logic, its an pro-american site afterall

another quote from the same link:


It is even unclear which missiles were launched: the general assumption has been that these were RS-54s, which entered service in the mid-1980s. Their service lives have already expired, but were extended, as is the standard practice now in Russia. There is at least one report, however, that the failed missiles were the 1999 modification of the SS-N-23 called Sineva


So you're saying that we are not the believe the russians w.r.t. their SLBM launches..because you asy it may be falsified info

Who's more gullible now..
plus you conviniently ignored all those successful launches which I oh so meticulously posted posted to ..umm.. enlighten you..




posted on Aug, 23 2005 @ 01:52 PM
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Originally posted by Daedalus3


Who's more gullible now..
plus you conviniently ignored all those successful launches which I oh so meticulously posted posted to ..umm.. enlighten you..



lol, get over yourself, you edited and put in all that stuff after I had posted. Please your ambush tactics won't work on me.

And yes, Russian SLBm cpapbility is sketchy.



posted on Aug, 23 2005 @ 06:25 PM
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There were also many successful space launches from Russia, but they are STILL just releasing information about the failures. The only reason people heard about ANY of their failures during the Cold War was when they were tied into something major, like the Soyuz Rendevous between the Soviet and American craft, where the Cosmonauts were killed by decompression after they undocked. The Russians aren't going to come out and admit their failures openly, just as the US doesn't always admit them.



posted on Aug, 24 2005 @ 07:41 AM
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yeah well thats because on hindsight I doubted your ability to actually go and read the ENTIRE article at the link posted and so I well pasted it all here..
That what I edited or didn't doesn't change the fact that Russia infact does have
a credible SLBM deterent.. as indicated by a non-russian site..Thats the crux of the matter..
And that is exactly what you are trying to rebuke..
Or were you actually just engaging me in a strawman arguement now??..


And please dont discredit the Russian space program.. for the last 2 years it has been the only way to space for manned flight.. Nobody's saying its "better" than the american program.. but when you talk about how many failures the program was ridden with and veiled in secrecy, please remember that their delivery system works just fine today, and until recently was the only way americans could get to/and get off (in case of an emergency) the ISS..

[edit on 24-8-2005 by Daedalus3]



posted on Aug, 24 2005 @ 08:09 AM
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Originally posted by Daedalus3
yeah well thats because on hindsight I doubted your ability to actually go and read the ENTIRE article at the link posted and so I well pasted it all here..

No you didn't post the link and just said a few lines of ramble.




blah blah blah ....and until recently was the only way americans could get to/and get off (in case of an emergency) the ISS..


Yeah in an emergency, as a last resort. LOL.



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