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Nanotech Breakthrough of the Decade

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posted on Aug, 23 2005 @ 03:46 PM
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oh, thanks sardion2000, I thought I had the link right...guess not.

and what is that pic of? (your first one)




posted on Aug, 23 2005 @ 08:46 PM
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Can someone explain to me whats happening in that video, is the clearish white ribbon being create byb nanomachines and the machine is moved down the ruler. and what is that ribbon.



posted on Aug, 23 2005 @ 08:58 PM
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I don't have time to explain thouroughly, but here is a link to something that may help you:

(Those are Carbon Nanotubes being created by the way)

Nanotubes

I haven't looked through the site myself, I just have it bookmarked right now, so I'm not sure how well this may answer some of your questions.



posted on Aug, 23 2005 @ 09:35 PM
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Here is something I found that I have included in my paper, but thought I should go ahead and share it. This pretty much tell how we could purify sea water and any other source.


Much water today is wasted because it is almost but not entirely pure. Simple, reliable mechanical and electrical treatment technologies can recover brackish or tainted water for agricultural or even domestic use. These technologies require only initial manufacturing and a modest power supply. Physical filters with nanometer-scale pores can remove 100% of bacteria, viruses, and even prions. An electrical separation technology that attracts ions to supercapacitor plates can remove salts and heavy metals. The ability to recycle water from any source for any use can save huge amounts of water, and allow the use of presently unusable water resources.



posted on Aug, 23 2005 @ 09:48 PM
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Originally posted by Murcielago
and what is that pic of? (your first one)


That one on page one? That's the guy using the "spinner" to create a nanotube ribbon. Click on it for the video.

To SmokeyTheBear the secret is apparently a Post-It Note. Well kinda of lol


Using sticky paper similar to a Post-it Note, the scientists teased out long sheets of the material from clumps of carbon fibres prepared in their laboratory. The sheets were initially full of holes but could easily be squeezed into dense ribbons capable of supporting drops of water and orange juice some 50,000 times their weight.



posted on Aug, 23 2005 @ 11:33 PM
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hmm, I didn't no they were thin enough to see through.



posted on Aug, 24 2005 @ 03:21 AM
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Originally posted by Murcielago
hmm, I didn't no they were thin enough to see through.


Also I should note in one of the articles they stated that even though it's so thin that you can see through it, it can still support 50,000 times it's own Mass. I forget the exact context of the quote cuz it's late, but if you comb through this thread and the links you should find it



posted on Aug, 27 2005 @ 12:51 PM
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What is the difference between polymers and this nanotube idea? Where are nanotubes being used, how much do they cost per tube?

I hear about this technology and how it is going to be the future of everything on television and read about it in magazines, but then I start talking about it and people say it is decades off from achieving a desired market value.



posted on Aug, 27 2005 @ 01:28 PM
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It is 15 to 20 years off of becomeing the leader in all manufacturing. Right now it is fairly expensive for the tubes, seeing as how this is a developing technologfy,. but it will soon become cheaper than any current manufacturing process. Everything that is produced will be cheap enough for anyone to afford. Everyone always imagines the world with highly advanced technology as being one highly crowded... almost like the Star Wars planet of Couracant or however you spell it, but in reality, the world will become cleaner, with more efficient energy, more/cleaner water, and more land area. I can't remember the main difference between polymers and nanotubes, besides the fact that nanotubes are EXTREMELY durable. If I get the chance to re-look it up for you today, I will. I should be spending a lot of my time continuing research today for my paper.



posted on Aug, 27 2005 @ 01:45 PM
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Im very excited about nanotech, I think it will change the world and improve the enviroment.I think you guys might like to see this video of a nano factory at work.While its cgi its still pretty nice representation.

www.i-am-bored.com..." target="_blank" class="postlink">Productive Systems : From molecules to super products

[edit on 27-8-2005 by Merkeva]



posted on Aug, 27 2005 @ 03:37 PM
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The reason I ask what the difference between polymers and nanotubes are, is due to the fact that they sound exactly the same. A research proffesors at the University of Houston even calls this technology polymer nanocomposites.

www.egr.uh.edu...
www.chee.uh.edu...

I think maybe the difference in scale is the only attribute separating the two, nano.



posted on Aug, 27 2005 @ 03:44 PM
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Originally posted by Frosty
I think maybe the difference in scale is the only attribute separating the two, nano.


Correct, but that is a HUGE different, the difference between Micro and Nano is Nano is 1000x smaller then Micro
Another name for these things are Fullerines after Buckminster Fuller. The reason why people seperate them is because once you get below 100 nanometers wierd things start to happen. Quantum Physics, Surface Tension and Van der Waals forces rules the world of the Nanoscale.

[edit on 27-8-2005 by sardion2000]

[edit on 27-8-2005 by sardion2000]



posted on Aug, 27 2005 @ 06:10 PM
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Wow, they made many breakthroughs with nanotech in the last few years. Mabey that space elevator that I called all of you guys crazy for might actually get built, sorry about that.

I still think that Liftport is a con meant to steal patents and never will build the elevator. The CEO and executives will then flee to a tropical island and live in oceanside masons. I think NASA will be the one that will eventually build it in about 50 - 80 years time.

Nanotechnology can benifit in the world fresh water shortage. We do have plants that make ocean water drinkable, but have you ever actually tasted the water? It tastes chloronated and has a metal after taste. Nano sized filter screens can remove impurities without the usage of chemicals or energy consuming distillation.



posted on Aug, 27 2005 @ 07:57 PM
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Originally posted by GoldEagle
Mabey that space elevator that I called all of you guys crazy for might actually get built, sorry about that.

No worries, it usually takes a few years of study to see just how fast a tech is progressing, and as I have been studying it for some 6 odd years now, I'm constantly astonished to see my expectations for development time be completely blown out of the water. Now some of the breakthroughs will take a while to get out to the Consumer, like the Nanotube Diode for example I predict it won't reach any product for at least 10-15 years, allthough it will be used by more performance consious Gov'ts and Corps rather soon production won't ramp up for a while in that case IMHO. As for this breakthrough? Well I predict that we will see initial products start to seep out in the next few years. Car's, Space Vehicles and Sports Equipment will be the first to benefit IMHO.



The CEO and executives will then flee to a tropical island and live in oceanside masons. I think NASA will be the one that will eventually build it in about 50 - 80 years time.

Do you have any evidance that they will do as you say? Did you do a background check and dig up some dirt I'm not aware of? As for them trying to squat on some patents, that's very risky without any backing. 50-80 years for a Human Capacity elevator yes, Cargo elevators will be first and will be built much sooner. No later then 2040 Imo. The inventors of this new textile will be entering it into the Tether Competition for the SpaceElevator prize(or whatever it's called) I believe it's the very first entrant in the Tether category.


Nanotechnology can benifit in the world fresh water shortage. We do have plants that make ocean water drinkable, but have you ever actually tasted the water? It tastes chloronated and has a metal after taste. Nano sized filter screens can remove impurities without the usage of chemicals or energy consuming distillation.

That's near term, we have Nanofilter's on the market right now, they can even filter our virus'. And Desalinating Nanofilters will still need some electricity just not as much.



posted on Aug, 27 2005 @ 08:06 PM
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Originally posted by GoldEagle
Nanotechnology can benifit in the world fresh water shortage. We do have plants that make ocean water drinkable, but have you ever actually tasted the water? It tastes chloronated and has a metal after taste. Nano sized filter screens can remove impurities without the usage of chemicals or energy consuming distillation.


Not sure if you saw my post above already... but it explains how the water would be purified... no matter how filthy it is.



posted on Aug, 27 2005 @ 08:18 PM
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Two carbon nanotube sheets support droplets of orange juice,
water and grape juice. The mass of each droplet is up to 50,000
times that of the contacting sheets.


www.msnbc.msn.com...

Another article with a really nice photo



posted on Aug, 27 2005 @ 08:39 PM
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Originally posted by sardion2000
Do you have any evidance that they will do as you say? Did you do a background check and dig up some dirt I'm not aware of? As for them trying to squat on some patents, that's very risky without any backing.


It just seems suspicious how someone decided one day to start a company that will build a space elevator in 15 years time. In a few years the dirt may start to show. When a large company contracts a bunch of small companies into something that hasn't been done before, what I pointed out is the norm. I by no means however I'm saying that the space elevator is not going to be constructed, it will, later then sooner though.

I'm going into the feild of Biochemistry, probably end up working for Petro-Canada or something like that. I'm very interested in Carbon Nanotubes, I never got a definitive answer to:

What's it's melting point or the point it denatures at (breaks up)? I heard 700C once and at other time more.
Is it a polymer (contains hydrogen, like a plastic)?



posted on Aug, 27 2005 @ 08:47 PM
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I'm thinking of going into Nanomechanical Engineering at Waterloo, this breakthrough makes me wanna go even more, but I have to go back to school to upgrade Math and Biology :p


What's it's melting point or the point it denatures at (breaks up)? I heard 700C once and at other time more.

It's higher the 700C I believe, remember it conduct's heat in certain configurations.


Is it a polymer (contains hydrogen, like a plastic)?

A carbon nanotube is made of Carbon. That's it. A Buckyball (which would be more pertinent to a biologist IMHO) is a C60 molecule. Pure Carbon. The Purer the better for strong polymer chains.

[edit on 27-8-2005 by sardion2000]



posted on Aug, 27 2005 @ 08:52 PM
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I did just a quick search for the melting point and came up pretty empty. I think to truly find that out would require a little bit of research. I did find this however:



Further, carbon nanotubes are structurally
stable nearly up to a the melting point of graphite, i.e., up to about
3,500 degrees Celsius.



posted on Aug, 27 2005 @ 09:00 PM
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Ya you have to take Biology [gr12] and Calculus [gr12] in highschool to make it into Biochemistry. Discreet Math [gr12] (the worst math imaginable, no one has ever gotten above 75% in it while I was in high school and you need a 75% minimum) and Chemistry [gr12] to get into Nanomechanical Engineering. Waterloo is a good school but it's more focused on Psychology. I recommend UofT or York for that.

I was refering to this diagram that there are hexyl groups attached to the carbon nanotube structure. Hexyl contains hydrogen.



EDIT: Whoops, not Heptyl it's Hexyl, I miss counted the carbons.

[edit on 8/27/2005 by GoldEagle]



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