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NEWS: Biodiesel Mushrooms In Netherlands As Oil Prices Soar

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posted on Aug, 15 2005 @ 09:49 PM
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Popularity of biofuels which are seen as a more environmentally friendly and cheaper fuel source is rising and project to produce the fuels made from rapeseed have mushroomed in The Netherlands. The Biofuel is sold at a price of .65 cents PL in one service station which also sell the crude oil diesel at $1.24 per litre. Tax incentives will be introduced to farmers to raise acreage under the rapeseed which currently does not have enough land available to keep up with the rising demand.
 



www.planetark.com
EU countries have pledged that biofuels, which turn organic matter like vegetable oils, grains and sugar cane into energy, would make up 2 percent of their total fuel consumption this year and 5.75 percent by 2010.

The cost to convert an ordinary car engine was about 3,000 euros and some 6,000 euros for a truck's engine, he said, adding the spending was compensated fairly quickly by the slashed fuel bills.


Please visit the link provided for the complete story.


This is excellent news for The Netherlands and the rest of the world. It has been said that the biodiesel is more expensive than crude but by the looks of the article that is not true. So why are we not doing this on a massive scale to convert completely to the biodiesel and stop the destruction and stop the control of the crude oil industry?

I have a suggestion if The Netherlands does not have the acreage available I am sure there is enough land free here in Australia to grow the product to export to the world.


[edit on 15-8-2005 by Mayet]




posted on Aug, 16 2005 @ 12:29 AM
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I agree with the sentiment that we should be producing this as much as possible, but it is also possible for the price of Biofuel to rise above that of Crude, as demand for Crude decreases and demand for Biofuel increases. I mean that Biofuel may be more expensive than the current price of Crude, all because we have a limited amount of space which the fuel can be produced on, because of the fact that it is a crop and takes much more maintenence than a machine. There are too many variables currently to say whether or not Biofuel is a more cost effective form of fuel.



posted on Aug, 16 2005 @ 02:10 AM
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We have many kinds of mushrooms here in the US, some of which sprout from cow patties and are highly prized by those who seek to enlighten themselves through introspection and a supposed enhanced communication with the spiritual world, but I have never heard of these biodiesel mushrooms.

Oh! Wait a minute. I got confused there for a moment.

It is interesting to note that a recent study claiming that biodiesel is a dead-end because it is not cost effective has been alleged to be seriously flawed.

Herald Tribune


[edit on 2005/8/16 by GradyPhilpott]



posted on Aug, 16 2005 @ 02:54 AM
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What utter madness. Using prime agricultural land to produce fuel. How about using prime land for food and trade with the some of the hotter countries for energy. They can use their sunshine (in deserts !?!?) to produce fuel/energy. Conversely some of the bleak windier areas could also generate fuel/energy whilst we grow the food.

Of course this would mean a coordinated effort to solve the worlds problems......no chance. So the EU will carry on ploughing back tons of unsellable food because stupid consumers think all fruit and veg is the same colour and shape whilst children in Africa are dying of hunger because too much sunshine (energy!) caused a drought.

It's a mad world isn't it ?



posted on Aug, 16 2005 @ 03:41 AM
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Originally posted by GradyPhilpott
We have many kinds of mushrooms here in the US, some of which sprout from cow patties and are highly prized by those who seek to enlighten themselves through introspection and a supposed enhanced communication with the spiritual world, but I have never heard of these biodiesel mushrooms.

Oh! Wait a minute. I got confused there for a moment.

It is interesting to note that a recent study claiming that biodiesel is a dead-end because it is not cost effective has been alleged to be seriously flawed.

Herald Tribune


That is interesting you say that as I was reading the other day here on ATS someone saying that biodiesel is expensive and not cost effective. Why are these people Poo Poo'ing a good idea that solves agricultural problems and is more environmentally friendly

The way I understand it and I am no expert, the biodiesel is made from a process using sugar to make methane and seed crop to make the diesel (by the way a side note, has anyone looked a using hemp seeds which are prolific when grown natural). Here in Australia our sugar inductry is having over supply problems. It wasn't included in the free trade agreement with the USA for some strange unknown to me reason.

We have vast areas available to plant seed crops and I have heard biodiesel can be made from a variety of seed crops. So here in Australia we have the ideal conditions to begin this process and yet our government insists on playing the "crude" game and saying that biodiesel is too expensive. No i disagree, it may just be that the government will lose the import taxes and so on from the ultimate consumer. I mean here is a country that pays 1.13 to 1.30 a litre for crude produced diesel. 59 cents of that price goes to tax and not only that gst is placed on top of that tax, being another ten percent. Thats a whopping tax margin for a product. So I can see why the detracters are pushing the idea onto the backburner.

This issue is in serious need of open public debate. More studies need to be done, tax breaks given to potential producers and farmers and the government needs to get green.

Malcr your reply stunned me. Utter madness to use crops instead of crude oil reaped from the depths of the earth ? .....Crops are sustainable and can be planted year after year to replace without much damage to the environment. The government could go the whole hog and get more with the ideas of desalinization plants and reusing refuse water to sustain these crops.

Yes we should be going solar, once again though I can see our local electricity companies not being too happy about the cuts to their massive profits *insert sarcasm here.

Its all big business. Our government is talking selling off Telstra to get some cash in their pocket and the company made 4.4 billion dollars of that cash in profit last year alone. Instead of selling the government should be holding it's asset and using the profit for these tax breaks and to further development of green energy.

We are slaves to a greater power though. Free trade agreement with the USA is not so.

We as a nation have ceased to speak for ourself and to go our own way. We have given those rights over to nations like the USA. We do not do anything that might displeasure our masters.

Children are starving in africa, children are also starving here while the sale of Telstra takes money out of every Australian's pocket and puts it into the pockets of the few elite rich shareholders.

What do we do, stand back and let it happen? It seems so, now even native title laws so hard fought for ten years ago are being changed in legislation quietly quietly and fast fast before anyone sees whats going on.

All the laws and ideals we fought hard for over the past twenty or thirty years is being arrogantly changed by our liberal government who has control of both houses of parliament, privatization of government assets, industrial relation and unfair dismissal changes, uranium mining in the northern territory, free health scrapped and the native titles.

The government has really made the last 30 years of moving forward and fight for rights worthless. The opposition which is really the right hand of the left hand is making mouse whimpers of pretend opposition. members speaking out are quickly silenced into agreeing with these changes.

When are people going to wake up and see their rights stripped to nothingness.

Australia, the lucky country.....where the rich get richer and the poor are expendable.

This just doesn't go for Australia though, it is happening in other nations to as we march in tune to The New World Order.

I started reading about the NWO in the 80's when I was young and free and I could never believe back then that it would happen. It was even more underground and hushed up than it is today. Throughout the 90's it was quiet but now I find with the dawn of the New Century upon us, " the big bang". It exists, it's here alive in 2005.

[edit on 16-8-2005 by Mayet]



posted on Aug, 16 2005 @ 05:26 AM
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Some one said something about these new alternative fuel sources eventually being overpriced when the demand goes up. That's actually very wrong when you are talking about a developing technology that has not "found its market" yet. There is a fixed cost in making shroom-gas, corn-gas or whatever-gas, and that cost remains the same whether you're making two hundred gallons or 2000 gallons (as long as you stay within the capacity of your shroom-gas factory). So if two people are buying shroom-gas, you have to dole out the overhead to two people, and if two million are buying, you get to dole it out to two million. So when you're in the early stages of an emerging technology, the price will be off the equilibrium point of the Supply/Demand curve. This has been most apparent in such electronic devices as TV's, PC's, DVD's, etc. Ask somebody how much the first VCRs were - it will blow your mind. Eventually, if the market can be created, the price will come down. Then, once the market is established, it will follow the traditional S-D curve. In the graph below we are on the Qs vertical line for an emerging technology. Increased demand will shift the price to the left.



[edit on 8-16-2005 by Valhall]



posted on Aug, 16 2005 @ 05:34 AM
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And then somebody said something about it being ridiculous to use good farm land for this type reason. Actually, with the employment of rotating crops, things like this can easily be worked in to what has long been known to be land usage best practices. I assure you there is some complimentary food crop that is stripping certain nutrients from the land, that if a shroom crop is planted and harvested ever so often would replenish those nutrients.

Don't worry - the farmers know how to do this.

[edit on 8-16-2005 by Valhall]



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