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Sage herb 'can boost memory'

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posted on Aug, 29 2003 @ 01:23 AM
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Centuries-old theories that the herb sage can improve memory appear to be borne out by modern research

news.bbc.co.uk...

I'd like to try out this sage oil and see if it helps me out, or if it's just a placebo...

Hmm never know, maybe it is all in our heads.

[Edited on 29-8-2003 by Lysergic]




posted on Aug, 29 2003 @ 06:55 AM
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Hmmm, but the article doesn't specify which type of sage. The sage genius (Latin name Salvia) consists of over 900 species. Do they mean common sage - Salvia officinalis which I have growing in my garden? I sometimes make a tea using sage leaves. Deni Bown's book The New Encyclopedia of Herbs & Their Uses says sage is used medicinally for indigestion, gas, liver complaints, night sweats, anxiety, depression but that it is toxic in excess or over long periods. Doesn't mention anything about it improving memory.

Common sage contains a camphoraceous oil, consisting of about 50 percent thujone which in excess is hallucinogenic, addictive and toxic. My books say Salvia lavandulifolia (Spanish sage) doesn't contain any thujone so maybe this is a type of sage that could be taken on a daily basis without any of the side effects of the other varieties. I guess I wouldn't be comfortable using it (the essential oil) on a daily basis but I use the leaf of common sage as a culinary and tea herb quite often.




posted on Aug, 29 2003 @ 07:12 AM
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And of course, then there's the problem of REMEMBERING to take the darn sage.

I have this memory and brain booster formula. Only I do forget to take it... no kidding!



posted on Aug, 29 2003 @ 07:42 AM
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On a more serious note, I did some prowling through my university's electronic library and did come up with the name of the center (centre, since it's British) where the studies took place. Here's their list of recent publications, but the initial study about sage appears to be 1998-ish and previous reports go back to 1995:
www.ncl.ac.uk...

There was a book published, "The Sage of Enlightenment." However, there's no reviews of it online.

Hmm.

And Newcastle hasn't been that busy publishing papers.
www.ncl.ac.uk...

I did check the electronic resources of the grad school library, but the earliest New Scientist article on this is 1995, and as it happens we do NOT have that one in our resource library. Feh.

A cursory glance says that Itzhaki tends to write "fluffy science for the masses." Her articles seem readable, but they seem to popularize other findings rather than to be original research.



....and all that to say it's not available in UNT's online resources but I think you've got a good guess, Herblady, that it's the European sage.



posted on Aug, 29 2003 @ 10:32 AM
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I just went to two aromatherapy sites and they both mention that sage oil can be used to enchance memory (and one site says that it can also be used to grant wishes - bonus points!!)


But they are using the essential oil externally only, and they don't mention which species of sage but I'm assuming common sage (Salvia officinalis) since that is the only kind I've seen in stores.

The recommended use is:

1. 1-2 drops of the oil in a bowl of hot steaming water, cover your head with a towel and lower it to just a few inches above the bowl, inhale the resulting steam until the water cools down.

2. Place 5-6 drops into a bathtub of warm water and have a nice relaxing herbal bath.

3. Place 3-4 drops of the oil into a base oil such as almond or grapeseed and find a friend to give you a massage.

I'd say option 3 would be the most enjoyable!


I'd still like to know if there is a safe to use variety of the sage in pill form that is supposed to enchance ones memory. I'll have to do some snooping around the next time I'm at Wholefoods Marketplace or the Vitamin Shoppe. The staff at the VS is usually pretty knowledgeable of the latest herbs and their uses.



posted on Aug, 29 2003 @ 12:25 PM
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ROFL!

Hey, count me in on the massage option!

Looking at the other things they've published (which hasn't been that much), I think you're correct -- it's the commonly available sage oil. They seem to be following up on an earlier aromatherapy paper. I *wish* I could find some of their research online, because it'd tell how well they actually do research. I'm not sure how picky "New Scientist" is in accepting papers.

You know, one option that isn't mentioned and might be useful is a "scent bottle." As I recall, Victorian ladies used to carry around such things and sniff them on various occasions (lavender for headaches was one that I remember. Or misremember.)

I'm tempted to experiment with that sort of thing and eucalyptus (which is said to help decrease hunger pangs.)

You could probably use culinary sage -- but remembering how much the quality varies over time you'd be better off growing your own if you were seriously into this. Either that, or pig out on Italina food!

They might have a good sage tea, too. But without access to the papers, I'm not sure what they think they're measuring and whether or not it is one of the flavinoids that is an oil extract or a water or alcohol extract.

Just to be on the safe side, we could put a whole buncha sage leaves in some 90 proof white rum and let that steep for two weeks and take 50 ml or so of it... uhmm... medicinally, doncha know. I bet we could remember to take it, too!


[Edited on 29-8-2003 by Byrd]



posted on Aug, 29 2003 @ 12:56 PM
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Originally posted by Byrd
ROFL!

You know, one option that isn't mentioned and might be useful is a "scent bottle." As I recall, Victorian ladies used to carry around such things and sniff them on various occasions (lavender for headaches was one that I remember. Or misremember.)

[Edited on 29-8-2003 by Byrd]


Yes, that's a good idea. I think one of the aromatherapy sites mentioned using one of those essential oil diffusers - either the kind that fits over a light bulb or the kind that gets put over a candle. The heat will slowly release the scent into your home - I was thinking relaxing herbs such as lavender could be used in this manner to help with problems such as insomnia but any kind of oil could be used. I should use the sage oil this way in my kids room now that they are back in school - they might turn out to be geniuses!

And as far as tinctures go (herbs steeped in somekind of high proof alcohol) I always wondered if it was the herbs or the alcohol that one was benefiting from! My herbal books all mention using Everclear which I think is like 100 proof. Yeah baby - them herbs work good!



posted on Aug, 29 2003 @ 02:47 PM
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Hello, if you have time and know the answer, could you please give me a breakdown of what salvia divornium does? What are the pros and cons? Would this sage help with memory as well? I am very curious as to the spirtual side of the herb and look forward to hearing back from you... Thanks a lot



posted on Aug, 29 2003 @ 09:07 PM
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I've got a selection of recipes for liqueurs (do-it-yourself kind) and there's an Elizabethan one that's "for whatever ails you." The modern version is made with rum (most are made with rum or vodka because Everclear is just undrinkable unless you cut it) and it does include sage and rosemary and some other stuff.



posted on Aug, 30 2003 @ 08:58 AM
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Originally posted by 29MV29
Hello, if you have time and know the answer, could you please give me a breakdown of what salvia divornium does? What are the pros and cons? Would this sage help with memory as well? I am very curious as to the spirtual side of the herb and look forward to hearing back from you... Thanks a lot


Sorry, none of my books mention Salvia divornium. Isn't this one of the herbs that is smoked for its Canabis sativus (pot) like effects? I'm sure a search on the internet would turn up lots of information.

I just did a quick search through google and found the site users.penn.com/~petro/salvia.html. It has lots of information on SD including the following blurb: "the plant was used by Mazatec Indians of South Central Mexico for divination and healing." I think the dried leaves are smoked like marajuana but SD is not currently subject to any legal restrictions.



posted on Sep, 5 2003 @ 12:22 PM
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Salvia Divinorum, is the substitute to marijuana. Although it has been talked about by the government to class the plant, and make it illegal. The effects of Salvia are minimal compared to that of marijuana, but the effects differ from person to person. There have been stories of short term out of body experiences to a mild high, all of which last for a very short period of time. The dosage of salvia is also alot higher then that of marijuana. So basically you're killing your lungs alot faster with salvia divinorum then you would with marijuana.



posted on Sep, 5 2003 @ 12:32 PM
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Thanks IDN,
There may be hope left in this forsaken country...
Where is this "Salvia Divinorum" grown?
- Tassadar



posted on Sep, 5 2003 @ 09:01 PM
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It's found in and around the amazon, but you can find growers in california






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