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1 metre diameter particle accelerator.

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posted on Aug, 4 2005 @ 03:57 PM
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Wuld it be possible to build a particle accelerator, but really small, say 1m in diameter? Would there be any point???




posted on Aug, 4 2005 @ 08:29 PM
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Well, of course there'd be a point, you could accelerate particles in a small space, probably for cheap.

Of course it's not possible. You need to have a beam of particles, which itself is going to be huge, but mainly you'd need a huge electric field to accelerate them to any worthwhile velocity.

Technically, you could take a hoola-hoop, and call it a particle accelerator.



posted on Aug, 4 2005 @ 08:56 PM
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Almost every home in the modern world has a particle accelerator sitting in the livingroom. And many homes have more than one. It's called television.

If you have ever had an x-ray you have been in the company of a small particle accelerator.

We have them, and we use them everyday...............



posted on Aug, 5 2005 @ 12:44 AM
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Shadow88,
I assume you mean a collider.
Particle accelleration -> collision?

You would need some incredible magnetic fields to bend close to c particles in that tight a loop. [The kind that could pull you car in from 30 feet away i think]

They have to keep scissors and other metal objects far away from MRIs because them become lethal weapons if the magnetic field gets ahold of them. They get sucked straight through air by the power of the magnetic field.
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posted on Aug, 5 2005 @ 01:00 AM
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Originally posted by slank


They have to keep scissors and other metal objects far away from MRIs because them become lethal weapons if the magnetic field gets ahold of them. They get sucked straight through air by the power of the magnetic field.
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several years ago I tore up my elbow pretty bad. I had several MRI's where just my upper body was actually inside the machine. during these they let me keep my pants on, with metal button & zipper & a pocket knife inside. there was never the slightest feeling of magnetic attraction on any metal object I had on my person. if the field is that powerful would I have not felt it?



posted on Aug, 5 2005 @ 01:13 AM
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metal objects in the room with the MRI machine can become dangerous projectiles; paperclips, pens, keys, or scissors can be pulled out of pockets and sent flying toward the opening of the magnet (where the patient is placed) at very high speeds.

www.wcsscience.com...

Maybe stuff inside the machine is ok,
but not in the external room where it will get sucked in with the patient.

[Don't want scissors flying across the room and into the chamber with you. Ouch!]
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posted on Aug, 5 2005 @ 01:23 AM
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but thats what I'm saying...the metal objects were outside the machine. they had my lying with my arm extended above my head. I was outside the machine from about the nose down. maybe there would have to be some irregular condition for the field to become that strong?



posted on Aug, 5 2005 @ 01:48 AM
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But nobody asked me if I had any coins in my pants pockets or other metal objects on my person.

Could this magnetic field only be around the circumference of the MRI machine???

Member starts to whistle a tune from The Wizard Of Oz
If I Only Had A Brain.....................


Is there a doctor in the house?????? I think we need a second opinion.

[edit on 5-8-2005 by anxietydisorder]



posted on Aug, 5 2005 @ 09:19 AM
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Thats odd cause in james bond metal (guns) stick to it when one gets shot. could that be the mri malfunctioning???

and yes i mean a collider, as in what CERN has, but that one is underground and like the size of a village.



posted on Aug, 5 2005 @ 10:44 AM
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First off, Bond=movie.

Second off, MRI's are dangerous. Odds are you kept your pants on because they were doing your elbow. There have been cases where someone was wearing a ring in an MRI and basically got a huge electric shock up their hand, as well as a terrible burn. Old MRI's did some very bad damage before they got the technology right. My dad can't have one because he has a screw in his ankle, and, well, yeah. Still, outside is VERY dangerous.

Three, if it got shot, maybe it got damaged.

Four, as I said, no to the pocket accelerator/collider.



posted on Aug, 6 2005 @ 10:05 AM
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Originally posted by Shadow88
Wuld it be possible to build a particle accelerator, but really small, say 1m in diameter? Would there be any point???

If you mean the diameter in which the particles circle instead of the size of the device, cyclotrons are pretty much old technology already. However, whenever charged particles are accelerated, they emit radiation which causes them to lose energy. You may know that the centripetal acceleration of an object moving in a circle a = v²/r, so when you decrease the radius from a kilometer to a meter, your particles would experience stronger accelerations, emit more radiation and hence keeping them upto speed would be much more difficult.

It might however be possible to build a linear accelerator of only one or a few meter long. Chirped lasers can produce very high energy intensities in there beam which can provide accelerations in the order of magnitude of GeV per meter, which is much, much more than in current linear accelerators. For comparison, the Stanford Linear Accelerator, the most powerful one of today, accelerates particles up to several GeV in a length of around three kilometers. The problem is, they can currently only accelerate particle over a few millimeters at most and I don't think anyone has yet found a way to make them operate in series, but research is ongoing.

www.photonics.com...

[edit on 6-8-2005 by Simon666]



posted on Aug, 6 2005 @ 09:48 PM
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If you could aim two linear accelerators directly at one another you wouldn't have to use magnets to bend them in a circle.

How much distance is needed to get a particle [electron, proton] up close to light speed? I assume they use magnets to push/accelerate the ionized particle?
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