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Nessie...Why??

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posted on Jul, 31 2005 @ 03:37 PM
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Why Did The Legend Of Nessie Arise In The First Place, Is There Really A Mythical Beast Out There In The Dark Catacombs Of The Loch??

Come On People Lets Hear Those Thoughts!!







posted on Jul, 31 2005 @ 04:02 PM
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From this amazing book.... much much more on the topic as well...

www.creationism.org...

Scotland's famous Loch Ness Monster is too often thought to be a recent product of the local Tourist Board's efforts to bring in some trade, yet Loch Ness is by no means the only Scottish loch where monsters have been reported. Loch Lomond, Loch Awe, Loch Rannoch and the privately owned Loch Morar (over 1000 ft deep) also have records of monster activity in recent years.

Indeed, there have been over forty sightings at Loch Morar alone since the end of the last war, and over a thousand from Loch Ness in the same period. However, as far as Loch Ness itself is concerned, few realise that monstrous reptiles, no doubt the same species, have been sighted in and around the loch since the so-called Dark Ages, the most notable instance being that which is described in Adamnan's famous 6th century Life of St Columba.

On hearing this, and with never a thought for his own safety, the brave saint immediately ordered one of his followers to jump into the freezing water to see if the monster was still in the vicinity.

Adamnan relates how the thrashing about of the alarmed and unhappy swimmer, Lugne Mocumin by name, attracted the monster's attention. Suddenly, on breaking the surface, the monster was seen to speed towards the luckless chap with its mouth wide open and screaming like a banshee. Columba, however, refused to panic, and from the safety of the dry land rebuked the beast.

Whether the swimmer added any rebukes of his own is not recorded, but the monster was seen to turn away, having approached the swimmer so closely that not the length of a punt-pole lay between them.

Columba, naturally, claimed the credit for the swimmer's survival, although the reluctance of the monster to actually harm the man is the most notable thing in this incident. The first swimmer had been savaged and killed, though not eaten, and the second swimmer was likewise treated to a display of the creature's wrath, though not fatally. Most likely, the two men had unwittingly entered the water close to where the creature kept her young, and she was reacting in a way that is typical of most species. Gorillas, bull elephants, ostriches, indeed all sorts of creature will charge at a man, hissing, screaming and trumpeting alarmingly, yet will rarely kill him or harm him so long as the man takes the hint and goes away.

We can rely on it that Columba's follower, utterly lacking his saintly master's fortitude, had begun the process of taking the hint in plenty of time for the monster to realise that killing him would not be necessary.



posted on Jul, 31 2005 @ 05:32 PM
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www.nessie.co.uk...

www.lochness.co.uk...

Here's a couple of nessie sites to check out



posted on Jul, 31 2005 @ 06:17 PM
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Originally posted by Netchicken
Scotland's famous Loch Ness Monster is too often thought to be a recent product of the local Tourist Board's efforts to bring in some trade, yet Loch Ness is by no means the only Scottish loch where monsters have been reported.

Nor is Scotland the only place to have reported monsters. The Ogopogo was reported long before Europeans came to Lake Okanagan by Native Americans. The Native Americans called it Natiaka meaning "The Lake Monster".

Its a little off topic, but I just doubt these are all made up for tourism.

[edit on 31-7-2005 by Charlie Murphy]



posted on Jul, 31 2005 @ 06:23 PM
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Reports of the Loch Ness Monster have been reportedly recorded for centuries. There is a theory that the entire idea of Nessie comes from local folklore.



posted on Jul, 31 2005 @ 06:24 PM
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i wonder why and where the legends of the "loch ness monster" popped up but who can give us an exact answer?
also it could be just really HUGE fish or something....or maybe the real thing because you never know if someones faking or not....



posted on Jul, 31 2005 @ 06:57 PM
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Well according to pre roman and middle ages texts from writers these monsters were prolific and visible, not just stories. I suppose they have been killed off over time.



posted on Aug, 2 2005 @ 04:12 PM
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well i guess it is probably just a different species but we just haven't been able to take it in with our ignorance...



posted on Aug, 2 2005 @ 05:03 PM
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Originally posted by Charlie Murphy
Nor is Scotland the only place to have reported monsters. The Ogopogo was reported long before Europeans came to Lake Okanagan by Native Americans. The Native Americans called it Natiaka meaning "The Lake Monster".


We have our own lake monster in Sweden as well. It has been seen by hundreds of people since 1632. Check this site out (in english).

www1.webpublish.se...



posted on Aug, 2 2005 @ 05:37 PM
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that's weird how so many different places have like the same local legends... maybe it's true...



posted on Aug, 3 2005 @ 11:41 AM
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Originally posted by Charlie Murphy

Its a little off topic, but I just doubt these are all made up for tourism.

[edit on 31-7-2005 by Charlie Murphy]


No. Legends arise from many sources. Some are based on fact. Some from a chance observation of some mundane and ordinary, but not understood, event and the imagination takes over. And some are outright fabrications -- not necessarily fraud, but as a means to teach a moral lesson or some other benign purpose. The story will alter over time as it is recounted to subsequent generations. Oral histories change faster than written histories, but even written legends change with each new author adding his own interpretation and often adding new 'facts' to further his version.

The local business community will 'adopt' the legend regardless of its origins and use it as a means to increase tourism.



posted on Aug, 3 2005 @ 12:08 PM
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dave, your last line hits it home.

sure, something unexplained was spotted at Loch Ness. I'm not doubting some people saw something strange but there are always the copy cats and the people desperate for attention who add to the mystery with false claims.

The legend becomes a source of income for the local community.

Other towns with similar settings see the possibility for income and they do nothing to quiet the rumors and stories and, I'm guessing, often help fuel the fire.

How many large cities resting on deep lakes have similar sightings? Doubt if the numbers are very large. Does Geneva have a beast?

The link to the swedish site shows the local crafts for sale, it also tells you that, when a red balloon is flying at a house on the lake, it means the artist is home and will let you in to look at what they have for sale.



posted on Aug, 3 2005 @ 02:19 PM
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Have you noticed how all the above postings indicated sites in the northern hemi-sphere? Something in that?
And... to add, Ireland has a big share of sightings with some descriptions of the most ugliest beasts ever!



posted on Aug, 3 2005 @ 09:44 PM
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Here's a LINK about the first documented case of a creature being found in Loch Ness. There are many Nessie topics in the crypto forum,
www.abovetopsecret.com...
That should start you off, now you can go and do the rest of the legwork yourself


Regards,

Oakley



posted on Aug, 4 2005 @ 07:22 AM
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Originally posted by IronMan
Have you noticed how all the above postings indicated sites in the northern hemi-sphere? Something in that?
And... to add, Ireland has a big share of sightings with some descriptions of the most ugliest beasts ever!


I think Irish women are hot.



posted on Aug, 4 2005 @ 07:29 AM
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I believe i am the only english person to see it .



posted on Aug, 4 2005 @ 11:42 AM
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Originally posted by IronMan
And... to add, Ireland has a big share of sightings with some descriptions of the most ugliest beasts ever!


Could that be related to Ireland's greatest contribution to the world? More important than Ireland's long and fabled history of Arts and Literature is the invention of WHISKEY!!



posted on Aug, 4 2005 @ 11:59 AM
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Like the legend of Beddgellert in North Wales. enterprising local hotel owners are usually behind these hoaxes. Usually remote areas, poor weather & no real reason to visit.

Books in C12th England /Wales talk of two-headed fish, water flowing up hill etc etc - doesn't make it true though!



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